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Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal Audio, Cassette – Abridged, January, 1998


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Audio Literature; Abridged edition (January 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1574532243
  • ISBN-13: 978-1574532241
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,274,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From AudioFile

Wyatt Earp, his brothers and his enemies have been endlessly fascinating to Americans for more than a hundred years. Stuart N. Lake, having interviewed Earp in 1928, capably describes Earp's life and the milieu of the Western frontier in which he lived. Reader and composer Michael Martin Murphey brings a remarkable talent for characterization to the audiobook. With only slight changes in tone, accent and timbre, Murphey brings each of the prominent and passing characters to unique life. One would swear, for example, that when Earp speaks, another actor has entered the booth. He also composed the thoughtful background music found herein. D.R.W. (c) AudioFile, Portland, Maine

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Customer Reviews

Very entertaining reading.
S. R. Limper
I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in what life was like on the frontier.
Striker24
His research on Wyatt Earp were very detailed, and timing.
Evaldo Braz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Randy Keehn VINE VOICE on February 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
I just finished this most interesting biography of Wyatt Earp and I found myself both fascinated and a bit skeptical. I was fascinated by the life of Wyatt Earp as it was written by a man who interviewed him over a period of time. I was impressed with the research that the author, Stuart Lake, appeared to have put into his project. He had interviewed a number of surviving witnesses to the life of Earp. He also had a number of newspaper accounts and appears to have located a number of valuable documents in the course of his research. The book wasted little time in getting to Wyatt's career in law enforcement in the American West. The bulk, and I mean just about ALL, of the book is spent on his career in Wichta and Dodge City, Kansas as well as Tombstone, Arizona. The many famous (and not so famous) outlaws and lawmen of the Old West move in and out of the story on a regular basis. Stuart lists an almost endless number of feats of daring by Wyatt Earp in the process of making his case for Earp as the greatest of all men of the American West. Many of the events are depicted in great and compelling detail. Many of the parties are quoted, presumeably, from the memory of Earp himself. There is never a dull moment in the life of our hero, especially considering that all this action took place over a relatively short period of time. The book, at times, reads like a well-researched dime novel. For a chance to re-live the wild, wild West, it has little competition.
As for my skepticism, I came away wondering first of all; did all this really happen? Perhaps it did but our hero (and I am not trying to be facetious, Wyatt Earp truly is a hero) does it all seemingly with one hand tied behind his back. My other reservation has to do with the politics of the times and places.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Susan R. Matthews on March 22, 1998
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Given everything I've read about this book I was very pleasantly surprised by the quality and veracity of the narrative. I can understand how earlier reviewers taking Lake's claim to have received 100% of his facts from Earp, only from Earp, and entirely from Earp might have prejudiced people against Wyatt Earp, because there is a certain amount of "The tall lean figure of the fearless . . . " etc. The introduction puts this into context excellently well and I have no hesitation in recommending this book to people who are interested in the man and his era, with the proviso that they also read other texts (Sadie is referred two once or twice, never by name, during the portion of the narrative that covers Tombstone; Earp's marriage to and subsequent life with Josie (Sadie) Marcus Earp turns up only in the very last chapter -- on the next-to-last page, if I recall correctly). An excellent summarization of the Wyatt Earp mythos -- perhaps obviously so, since it is created with in large part creating that mythos (g). Still and all, not a book to be scorned, but to be read with a cross-reference or two at hand. The prose style holds up very well indeed.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 11, 1998
Format: Audio Cassette
It is hard finding books that tell the stories of the old west (especially of Wyatt and gang) that are free of opinion and myths. But Stuart N. Lake does just this in his wonderful book. A must for complete information on the exciting life of this Tombstone legend. I've read many books on this subject and have even been to Tombstone and Mr. Lake is an accurate author.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 22, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is a good beginning book on the life of Wyatt Earp. The author later admitted that Wyatt Earp did not tell him all the stories in the book. In fact, Earp was pretty silent about his life story. The Monmouth portion of the book omitted these facts: Earp lived in Monmouth, his birthplace, three different times-- 1848-50, 1856-59, and 1868-1869-- until the age of twenty-one. His grandfather was a justice of the peace in Monmouth, and his father was a constable. His family lived in town, and bought properties during the first two time periods. Wyatt was not married in Illinois, but in Missouri, by his father, then a justice of the peace. This book rivets your attention and makes you proud of Wyatt Earp, an Old West lawman, born into a family preserving the peace.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 18, 1997
Format: Paperback
I have just started reading the book. So this is really not a review but to pass on some information. Mr. Lake interviewed Wyatt exentsively before he wrote the book, so a lot of the viewpoint is Wyatt's. I don't know if Fred Dodge is mentioned in the book. He was my god father's father. I have a gun Wyatt gave him that he took off a dead criminal, also a stickpin the Wyatt had made for Fred out of a 1 dollar gold piece. Fred was a dead ringer for Morgan Earp. The other Earps had a hard time telling them apart. Fred was an undercover agent for Wells Fargo and was stationed at Tombstone. Wyatt did not find this out until Sep. of 1926. Wyatt had convinced Fred to allow Lake to do his biography. Fred wrote to Wyatt and informed him of his position and that solutions to some of the crimes would be found in the biography of Fred. Fred shipped a strog box to Lake filled with his notes and diaries. Lake died before he could write the biography. His daughter, Marion Lake, came across the strong box in a closet. She had to remove a board on the bottom because she could find no key. She compiled many of the notes into a book titled, "Undercover for Wells Fargo". This book is interesting and a good add to the books about the Earps. The book has been out of print for years but hopefully with the resurgence in the interest in western characters, maybe Houghton-Mifflin will release it again. I have been searching for a copy for a long time. I found one in a library in Lubbock, but that is the only copy I have seen. If you can find a copy of this book, you will find it a useful addition to your library.
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