Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book in great condition, lightly read. Experience the best customer care, fast shipping, and a 100% satisfaction guarantee on all orders.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Wyrm Mass Market Paperback – April 1, 1998


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.60 $0.01
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Spectra (April 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553578081
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553578089
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 4 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,561,954 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In 1999 Michael Arcangelo, a computer-virus hunter, is called in by an old friend to debug a computer designed to learn chess and defeat human grandmasters. He finds a "worm" that exhibits all the signs of intelligence and sentience and that invades the Internet. Interweaving mythology, virtual reality, role-playing games, chess strategy, and artificial intelligence with a theory of a Group Overmind Daemon susceptible to religious symbolism, first-timer Fabi pits a group of computer programmers and hackers against a formidable opponent who may fulfill end-of-the-world prophesies as the millennium approaches. Although the narrative flow is often broken by explanations of technical terminology and concepts, this work is imaginative and solidly conceived. Recommended for sf collections.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

The year is 1999. Michael Arcangelo's business is detecting and eliminating viruses, worms, and other computer-nasties from corporate files and operating systems. While attempting to cleanse a cutting-edge chess-playing program, he encounters a worm-- ``Wyrm''--that not only eats other viruses, but reconfigures other programs for greater speed and efficiency! He also meets Al Meade (she's in the same line of business), and the two strike immediate sparks. Further investigation shows that flexible Wyrm might well be intelligent and even self-aware. Problem? Well, the ubiquitous Wyrm has reorganized the entire computer net as a single massively parallel processor; worse, it's apparently planning a millennial apocalypse in which it will not only kill itself but take with it most of the human race by firing off nuclear missiles! The only way to attack Wyrm is through a vast virtual-reality role-playing game designed by computer genius Roger Dworkin--and Roger turns up dead. . . . Will any of this make sense to non-nerds? Let's just say that it helps if you can decode sentences like ``And the frobnule gives us full wizard privileges,'' and if you know your MUDs from your MOOs. A huge, ambitious roller-coaster of a debut, overstuffed with computer hackese, that tries--not always successfully--to meld the latest speculations in artificial intelligence with computer games, Monty Python, mythology, Lewis Carroll, and whatnot. Grab those wizard privileges and beware of hostile frobnules. -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 2, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
You, the reader of these reviews, will mostly see two types of reveiw: Good or terrible. That's because this book is aimed at a particular audience. Namely, computer nerds. To those of you who are computer literate, in the areas of tech stuff and games, this is a great read. It's comical, adventurous, full of little one-liners that generate more-than-your-average-one-liner laughter. It switches from real-reality to virtual reality, which at some points elevates the book, and at others points gets really annoying. But save the slightly unrealistic romance area of the plot, it's a great book. Again, this book isn't for everyone, but that doesn't mean only computer geeks can read it. I reccomend picking it up no matter who you are.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Koppel on June 24, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Last Sunday I read a surprisingly entertaining book by Mark Fabi titled WYRM. Possible the best way to describe it would be as a cyber-thriller, but it has far more elements than that. With the expected artificial intelligence, Internet and technology references, there is also a strong smattering of fantasy role-playing, Lewis Carroll, Monty Python and a plethora of modern cultural references.
WRYM is the story of Michael Arcangelo, a computer-virus hunter. While checking into a possible virus at a chess tournament, Michael is first exposed to a virus of unheard of proportions. An Internet-wide virus is out there and it may have developed intelligence. It may also have bought into the idea that the Millennium will bring about the end of the world.
Michael assembles a crack team of programmers, cyber-theorists and technicians to try and stop the virus Wrym from causing a global disaster. Through role-playing and some other techniques they draw nearer to the heart of the problem until a final all-out war involving the global hacker community ensues while Michael tries to make the final move toward victory.
I only had two minor problems with this book. One, Fabi does not know where the term bug came from. Secondly, I wonder at the wisdom of including a character referred to as Al in a story that uses the term AI as heavily as this one does. Other than that, this is one of the best books I have read in a long time. The book lures the reader in quite subtly. I didn't really realize it until two-hundred pages had gone by. The next thing I knew, I was four-hundred pages further along and the book was ending.
This book makes so many references and in-jokes that it could almost be considered a SILVERLOCK for the computer generation. But even if you do not recognize every Python reference, recognize every famous programer or catch all of the other cultural and scientific references, you will still be able to enjoy this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on July 10, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Don't get me wrong, this is a great book. I really wish there was a d*** movie, or at least a sequel. This book got off to a quick start, and it was a good, meaty start as well. The romance was a bit... advanced, to put in a word. The psycological concepts made a lot of sense, and I can't resist the temptation to read a book with a good fantasy part. This book had a lot of action, and a lot of great imaginings to it as well. Example: I usually rate a book on how well I feel that I could fit into the story. Believe me, if you try hard enough you can find yourself in this story. BUT BE WARNED!!! THIS BOOK CAN DESTROY YOUR SOCIAL LIFE!!! I remember the time I heard about MUDs. I didn't know what they were, so one day on the Internet, I searched on Yahoo for MUD. A list came up and I played on one. I found one so interesting that it took up quite a bit of my social time. I was obsessed. I have proof that I was too: one day one of my friends came up to me and said, "David, do you actually have a life?" because of this. So give a bit of thought to MUDs before you play them, unless it's only as a hobby. Anyway, this book is great for anyone interested in Greek mythology, fantasy Hack n' Slash, AD&D, RPGs, computer hacking, virii, the Internet, and apocolyptic predictions.
Final thoughts: A must read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 4, 1997
Format: Paperback
Mark Fabi's first novel is entertaining, fast-paced, and more timely than today's news! His main character, Michael Arcangelo, is a professional computer virus hunter, a sort of geek detective protecting powerful, yet all too vulnerable programs from damage and destruction by malicious hackers. Arcangelo encounters a super-virus that has invaded the latest development in Artificial Intelligence, a chess program that is poised to beat the world champion. (Like I said, it's timely!) As Arcangelo discovers, the virus has entered the Internet, and poses a threat that makes the Year 2000 Problem look like a bad crossword puzzle. Speaking of crossword puzzles, the author includes a *really good* crossword puzzle in the middle of the book for his characters (and readers) to solve. I started to work on it, but "WYRM" is such a compelling story that I really could not wait to find out what happened next.

"WYRM" compares favorably with William Gibson's "Neuromancer" and Neal Stephenson's "Snow Crash". Fabi writes with confidence and wit, and has a delightful sense of humor. I especially enjoyed the seamless transitions from the Real to the Virtual. I enthusiastically recommend this book, and I look forward to Fabi's next effort.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews