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X-Men: Mutant Massacre Paperback – October 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: X-Men (Marvel Paperback)
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics; Gph edition (October 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785102248
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785102243
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,253,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

In execution, though, this story hasn't aged well.
Kurt Conner
All things considered, this was a very good book and I would recommend it to any X-Men or Chris Claremont fan.
Tom
This was one of the ones I picked up and hadn't read before, and I came away a bit disappointed.
Stanley Fu

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By spacedog on August 19, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
in case you were wondering, this collection includes 10 issues:
Uncanny X-Men 210-213
X-Factor 9-11
New Mutants 46
Thor 373-374
Power Pack 27
technically an issue of daredevil also tied into this crossover, but it's not included here.
crossovers are always fun, but as another reviewer mentioned they tend to meander. the writers didn't seem overly concerned about keeping the crossover self-contained, so a lot of the comics bring up events that don't get resolved until after the events in the books contained here. most of the backstories are explained enough that newbie readers shouldn't be too clueless, although if you're new to the x-men you should start off w/ the essential x-men series.
highlights: great fight w/ psylocke, wolvie, and sabretooth; apocalypse assembling his four horsemen; angel getting overwhelmed by the marauders.
minor gripe: WHY does thor not have a beard on the cover when he does at the time of these comics??
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By C. Bedford Crenshaw on August 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you want complete stories, then you are not going to do much better. If you want to see the X-Men in a state of war, then this is a far better storyline than the X-Tinction Agenda. Lots of mutants, lots of fights, and lots of poignant moments, from the injuries that led to the creation of Excalibur and Archangel, to Psylocke joining the X-men, to the death of so many Morlocks. The inclusion of Thor and Power Pack was well-handled. This novel can not be more highly recommended.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Tom on October 26, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This was a fairly good book, but not the best X-men piece I've read. The story is an intriguing one, and very action packed. However, with all the different titles in here (Uncanny X-men, X-Factor, Power Pack, New Mutants, Thor, and Daredevil) there is a bit of overlap. The issues do not lead into each other, rather they overlap and make it repetitive.

This book tells the story of how the Morlocks were killed, and is important in the X-men continuity. I read this book due to seeing references to it in other X-men issues I recently read. It brings in many mutant characters and the Chris Claremont issues are top notch. That being said, the non-Claremont issues are lacking. The Power Pack issue was unreadable. I flipped through until I saw Morlocks or something related to the story. I also said to myself "Why did they make a comic based on the kids Thor helped in the previous issue? And why didn't they tell Thor they were the Power Pack? Oh, these are different kids, they just look pretty similar, and this has nothing to do with the previous issue."

Overall my problems with this book were:

1) Too repetitive - Leave the Morlock tunnels already! You'll get killed down there!!

2 Issues I didn't care about - How/why did Daredevil and Thor get included with an X-men title. After you read those issues you'll say "why didn't they just have (insert name of mutant you like) do that?

3) X-Factor - Are they mutant hunters, or mutant criminals, or mutant heroes? Why are they pretending to be humans who hunt mutants?! And why don't they just tell their allies the truth?! I suppose this is explained and resolved in earlier or later issues)

4 The non-Claremont issues - They just seem to be missing something compared to his issues.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
A good story with good art, featuring the first appearence of the Marauders, the foundation for Excalibur, the loss of Angel's wings, and the deaths of most of the Morlocks! There are two Wolvie vs. Sabretooth battles and some sub plots featuring X-Factor, Power Pack, Thor, and the New Mutants.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 9, 1996
Format: Paperback
This is a complete collection of what is probably the
first crossover storyline ever in the X-Men titles.
Claremont wrote this one long before Marvel's current
economic straits, when good writing came first and
foremost. Includes the hard-to-find Thor and Power Pack
issues as well.
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28 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First, the quality of the product. Very nice oversized binding. Great dustjacket with great cover by Romita Jr and back by Alan Davis. Has some great shelf appeal, although I'm not sure why they went with military style stencils for the title.
I am old enough that I collected the individual issues that make up this collection that tells the story of the Mutant Massacre. I remember the build up and the ads that showed up in all the Marvel comics promoting the big event and although there had been some crossovers before like the Asgardian Wars, this was the first big event crossover that I really remember.
Revisiting this storyline years later... well, I guess my tastes have changed over the past 25 years (oh my God!!) but this is a mixed bag to say the least. Chris Claremont was still knocking the ball out of the park in the Uncanny X-Men and New Mutant sections, but Louise Simonson's work on X-Factor and Power Pack really brings the proceedings to a halt. The difference between Simonson and Claremont is amazing. Claremont writes like his audience is adult; Simonson writes like her readers are somewhat slow children and I always find her characterization of well known and beloved characters offputting. The issue of Daredevil featured in the crossover is when that series was at a serious low point. In the years since I read this issue I had forgotten that DD once had a supporting cast of children that were some kind of weird homage to the Little Rascals and it is as annoying now as it was then. And then there is Walt Simonson's Thor, which I had never read before this and I can soundly say, meh.
Which brings us to the art work. This collected work is like a selection of art that I hated as a kid and really hate as an adult. It ain't all bad.
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More About the Author

Chris Claremont is best known for his work on Marvel Comics' The Uncanny X-Men, during which time it was the bestselling comic in the Western Hemisphere; he has sold more than 100 million comic books to date. Recent projects include the dark fantasy novel Dragon Moon and Sovereign SevenTM, a comic book series published by DC Comics. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.George Lucas is the founder of Lucasfilm Ltd., one of the world's leading entertainment companies. He created the Star Wars and Indiana Jones film series. Among his story credits are THX 1138, American Graffiti, and the Star Wars and Indiana Jones films. He lives in Marin County, California.

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