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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 7, 2005
  • Release Date: June 7, 2005
  • Label: Parlophone Records Limited
  • Copyright: 2005 Parlophone Records Ltd, a Warner Music Group Company
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:01:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TERLEK
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,383 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

455 of 535 people found the following review helpful By Michael Henshaw on June 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
It's hard to believe but it's been three years since Coldplay released A Rush of Blood to the Head. Now they are back with their third record X&Y. All of Coldplay's releases share one thing in common; they take some time getting into. When I first listened to Parachutes in the fall of 2000 I was not impressed. After a week it was the only thing I listened to for a six months. When A Rush of Blood to the Head came out it also took a few weeks for it to grow on me. The same thing applies to X&Y.

Starting off with the opening track "Square One" it is apparent that the record is a little more sonically dense than the band's previous efforts. While X&Y is a far cry from being experimental it's just enough of a change to make the new songs fresh. "What if" starts off as a slow piano song that finally builds up to a crescendo that exemplifies the transformation of Coldplay's sound. "Fix You," "White Shadows," Low" and "Twisted Logic" are instantly fan favorites. The hidden track "Til Kingdom Comes" was written for the late great Johnny Cash who passed away before he could record the song. It is a shame Cash did not get a chance to record it, but it makes a fitting and positive end to the album.

X&Y was a long time in coming but it was worth every bit of the wait. I cannot wait to hear how these new songs translate live. As one of the most eagerly anticipated albums of the year Coldplay does not disappoint with X&Y.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By B. Williams on June 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
It's hard to beat the emotional pull evoked by the elegant piano ballads 'Amsterdam', 'Warning Sign', 'The Scientist', and 'Clocks' from AROBTTH, but Coldplay just might have done it with the more guitar-oriented X&Y.

'Square One' is a great opener that shows that Britpop can be edgy. 'White Shadows' has a tremendous beat that makes you feel like busting out some dance moves. 'What If' and particularly 'Fix You' are beautifully recorded and represent their best work to date. 'Low' and 'Twisted Logic' are the most experimental tracks from Coldplay thus far.

Coldplay has never been a bigger target for criticism, but in X&Y they've built on past success to create a bigger, more vibrant sound that propels their music to new heights.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By GarionOrb on June 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Capitol Records is right to use Coldplay as the reason their stock rises or falls. With the release of X&Y, Coldplay has really taken their place as one of the more influential bands of our time. The reviews here have been mixed, but those one-star reviews really should be ignored on the release date. No one can give a fair review after one listen. I've been listening to this album all day....start to finish and over again.

This is by far Coldplay's breakthrough album. Yes, even more so than A Rush of Blood to the Head. I really don't understand all the comparisons to U2. Yes, Martin's voice sounds a bit like Bono's, but the musical style is completely different. X&Y is unmistakably Coldplay. The same vocal style, the same lullaby crooning, and the same ethereal crecendos. Only this time, they've added a synth here and there. The synths, however, don't overpower the live instrumentation. It's used merely as a support element. The result is that the music sounds more lush and has much more depth than in the first two records.

The first half of the album is so sonically uplifting it gives me chills. "Square One" and "Fix You" are almost reminiscent of Pink Floyd in their use of layered guitars (wow, the guitars on this album!) and layered vocals. The song "What If" is almost reminiscent of Sigur Ros in its ending swell. The very upbeat songs, "White Shadows" and "Talk" are also magical in their own right. The second half of the album starts out strongly with "Speed of Sound". This track is the only one that's of the same style as the first two albums. It's almost a perfect blend of "Clocks" and "Moses" (from the Live 2003 set).
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By The Groove on June 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Thanks to the relentless punch of the publicity machine, we all know that Coldplay now has a new album, and as it happens, "X & Y" turns out to be a good one. It's been a wild ride for the English band. Since their 2002 "A Rush of Blood to the Head," Coldplay have turned into international superstars, often inviting comparisons to U2 (and the comparisons are fairly accurate, as far as this reviewer is concerned) and developing a diverse mix of fans. Coldplay's latest album treads familiar ground, with a few welcome surprises and more of the same brand of sweeping rock listeners have come to expect. A moody piano, a subtle string section, and Chris Martin's earnest voice highlight the ballad "What If," while "White Shadows" is a mellow rocker whose guitar recalls the Edge from U2. But the song that almost made my jaw drop is "Talk," which steals the hook from "Computer Love" by Kraftwerk (I am not kidding). Coldplay influenced by the German synth quartet? Yes, it's true. The rest of the album follows a similar pattern: big sweeping melodies, choruses that soar kite-high, and no real duds. While odds are "X & Y" will be just as big a multiplatinum seller as its predecessor, it should also prove that Coldplay is more than "That British Band Whose Lead Singer Married That Hollywood Actress."
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