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Xerox Publishing Standards: A Manual of Style and Design Hardcover – November 1, 1988


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 498 pages
  • Publisher: Watson-Guptill (November 1, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0823059642
  • ISBN-13: 978-0823059645
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.5 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,786,544 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The rapid spread of electronic publishing affords many in the business world a whole new form of communication. This manual is intended as The Chicago Manual of Style for the many reports, catalogs, and newsletters produced by and for organizations. Under the headings "Publishing Process," "Document Organization," "Writing and Style," and "Visual Design" are covered the entire process of generating a publication, from conception through writing, graphic design, printing, and binding. This can be used either as a "how-to" for smaller businesses or as a means of standardizing and improving the publications of larger organizations. The explanations are concise and pragmatic, and the manual follows its own design principles in being well organized and easy to use. A boon to desktop and corporate publishers.
- Stephen H. Cape, Indiana Univ. Lib., Bloomington
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Johnston-Tyler on April 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I've been a technical communicator for 17 years, and bought this book when it first came out. With the advent first of electronic publishing, where everyone had to know something about layout and design, and next with the Internet explosion where even your dog's vet has a website, poorly designed or not, and now, the advent of XML, which will further drive the art of communication into the hands of the unskilled, this book is a gem. It is still as applicable now as it was then, and easily applies to electronic style guidelines as well as to print.

If you are at all interested in how people learn, how they consume information, what works in layout (electronic or print) and what does not, read this book. It should be mandatory reading for everyone who works in the 'knowledge industry', from tech writers to webmasters to information architects.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 3, 1998
Format: Hardcover
An impressive work which has aged well. The design notes and example it sets transcend the print medium. This is the Platonic ideal of standards manuals.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on June 24, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Desktop publishing has raised the bar on professional documentation. Consultants and other professionals need to be able to turn out volumes of reports, requirements documents, plans, and a variety of other professional documentation. It is no longer good enough that these materials are neatly typed on the page. Reports need to have an attractive, professional look to them.
The Xerox Style Guide provides a full range of advice on layout, style, and correct usage. I found the layout portions helpful in achieving page layout that looks highly professional and improves the comprehension of the reader.
The advice on writing clear is also helpful, and more concise than many other style guides.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Sauer on February 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is just what it claims to be: the standards of publishing used by the Xerox corporation, and as such it's not intended to serve as an off-the-shelf manual -- after all, it was written with only the needs of one company in mind. However, for those who are creating document designs and developing English-language writing standards for use in complex situations, this book provides not only good examples but also a clearly articulated rationale for document design. For instance, there is interesting commentary about why they decided on Optima as a corporate font for publications, why they use certain kinds of layouts (such as scan columns), and how they achieve what they believe to be the best possible usability in a document.

Though I have not found another handbook to be its peer in terms of page layout -- including printing and binding considerations -- I do think that this manual of design leaves a bit to be desired in the area of data presentation in tables, graphs and charts. On the other hand, it could be the case that more specialized books such as Tufte's The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, 2nd edition are more useful in this area. If so, it would be up to the reader to graft Tufte's data display ideas with the overall page layout ideas presented in the Xerox standards.

In terms of linguistic guidance, the particular spelling and phraseology guidelines in the manual are clearly tied directly to the technology and communications business environment in which Xerox operates.
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