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YERTLE THE TURTLE BK/CASS PKG. (Dr. Seuss Book & Cassette Classics) Hardcover – August 11, 1992


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Hardcover, August 11, 1992
$190.98 $46.84
--This text refers to the Library Binding edition.

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Product Details

  • Series: Dr. Seuss Book & Cassette Classics
  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers; Har/Cas edition (August 11, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679832297
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679832294
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 8.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,568,381 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Yet more wisdom cast down from high atop Mt. Seuss, this cheerful trio of tales teaches some valuable lessons in humility--thanks to a sharp-eyed worm, a bragging bear and rabbit, a fuzzy-tailed bird, and a couple hundred turtles led by their foolish King Yertle.

Yertle's story leads off with his attempt to build a bigger kingdom on the backs of his loyal subjects (literally). King of everything he can see, Yertle orders his turtles to stack up under him to build a towering throne. ("He made each turtle stand on another one's back and he piled them all up in a nine-turtle stack.") But a plain little turtle named Mack--stuck at the bottom--decides he's had enough. ("I know up on top you are seeing great sights, but down on the bottom we, too, should have rights!")

Following Yertle's downfall, a whiny girl-bird named Gertrude McFuzz wishes she had two feathers, just like Miss Lolla-Lee-Lou: "One droopy-droop feather. That's all that she had. And, oh! That one feather made Gertrude so sad." But even when Gertrude gets her wish--and then some--she finds that vanity has its price. Meanwhile, in "The Big Brag," a proud rabbit and an even-prouder bear duke it out in a battle of the senses, arguing over who's the best of the beasts, only to get their clever comeuppance from a wild-eyed little worm. (Ages 4 to 8) --Paul Hughes --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

From the Inside Flap

Illus. in color. Three modern fables in humorous pictures and verse.   --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.

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More About the Author

"A person's a person, no matter how small," Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. "Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted."

Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the consciousness of four generations of youngsters and parents. In the process, he helped millions of kids learn to read.

Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1925, he went to Oxford University, intending to acquire a doctorate in literature. At Oxford, Geisel met Helen Palmer, whom he wed in 1927. Upon his return to America later that year, Geisel published cartoons and humorous articles for Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at that time. His cartoons also appeared in major magazines such as Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty. Geisel gained national exposure when he won an advertising contract for an insecticide called Flit. He coined the phrase, "Quick, Henry, the Flit!" which became a popular expression.

Geisel published his first children's book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937, after 27 publishers rejected it.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1984, an Academy Award, three Emmy Awards, three Grammy Awards, and three Caldecott Honors, Geisel wrote and illustrated 44 books. While Theodor Geisel died on September 24, 1991, Dr. Seuss lives on, inspiring generations of children of all ages to explore the joys of reading.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#55 Overall (See top 100 authors)
#55 in Books
#55 in Books

Customer Reviews

True leaders will develop those who work for them.
James Vaughan
Children like to get into squabbles like this about their potential and ability, and your reading of this story can help avoid that.
Donald Mitchell
Yertle the Turtle is a great story but I love that this book also includes The Big Brag, and the story about Lolla Lee Lu.
Jess

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Researchers constantly find that reading to children is valuable in avariety of ways, not least of which are instilling a love of reading and improved reading skills. With better parent-child bonding from reading, your child will also be more emotionally secure and able to relate better to others. Intellectual performance will expand as well. Spending time together watching television fails as a substitute.
To help other parents apply this advice, as a parent of four I consulted an expert, our youngest child, and asked her to share with me her favorite books that were read to her as a young child. Yertle the Turtle was one of her picks.
This book has three stories in it, each with the same theme: Making Yourself More Self-Important Is the Wrong Direction!
Those who are familiar with Dr. Seuss's works during World War II as a political cartoonist will recognize the Yertle the Turtle theme as part of his satire of fascist dictators....
Your child will meet a lot of bossy people in her or his life, and this book can help prepare the way for understanding that one must assert one's rights or be trampled on. The child who is a natural leader can also learn the lesson of not abusing others. This story is a fundamental one for a democracy and should be read by every child. You will want to discuss applications of the lesson, as well, with your child.
The drawings are very funny and will keep your child laughing throughout.
Gertrude McFuss is about the dangers of envy. She was a girl-bird with the smallest plain tail ever. She had just one droopy-drop feather. Her friend, Lolla-Lee-Lou, had two feathers . . . both of which were larger. Gertrude decided she must has two also....
Your child will undoubtedly develop some envy of another child at this age.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By James Vaughan on September 4, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Yertle the turtle is a great book on leadership. It teaches you how NOT to be a leader. Yertle ordered the other turtles to pile up in order that he could be on top and be "king of all that I see." In the end the turtles collapsed and Yertle was back on earth with the rest of the turtles.
We see so many leaders that are like Yertle. Climbing all over others to get to the top. They often take the big fall much as Yertle did.
True leaders will develop those who work for them. The other "turtles" will elevate the leader to the top creating a sound foundation to allow the leader to stay at the top.
Don't be like Yertle.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 28, 2000
Format: Library Binding
This was the book that helped me learn how to read before entering school. My mother can attest to the fact that it was my favorite throughout my childhood. Now, as an adult in graduate school, I still reflect upon the lessons taught by good ol' Dr. Suess. Thank you.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 29, 1998
Format: Hardcover
If you are wondering whether or not to buy this book, buy it. I have had it read to me a bazillion times and still find it captivating. Everyone knows Dr. Seuss is the king of his art, but this is his masterpiece. I am thirteen and still love the book.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By neil_weinstein@yahoo.com on November 30, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Seuss tops himself once again with this exciting tale of turtle stacking, a difficult and dangerous pastime, to say the least. The fate of Yertle, King of the Turtles, should be a lesson to us all: success earned on the backs of the lowest turtles is no success at all, and will soon crumble.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Wayne A. Smith VINE VOICE on October 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Three great Dr. Seuss Stories in one book.
Yertle The Turtle presents what Dr. Seuss does so well -- Reaching kids with good morality tales that are fun and easy to commit to memory. The three lessons (Don't be greedy, be happy with how you look, and don't try to one-up each other)are well presented in a format that's fun and leads easily to discussion.
The art is fun, as always, and the poems clever. Dr. Seuss scored with this one, also.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By NIU mom on March 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
My daughter who is in kindergarten bought this book home from her school library after they had been reviewing the works of Dr. Seuss. This is by far her favorite Dr. Seuss book and a great value as it contains 3 full-length stories. The illustrations were very appealing and made the both of us laugh. This book would not appeal to children under age 5 as it requires some concrete thought in which children may not necessarily be ready for until they enter school. There are important lessons (envy, pride, etc) to learn that are perfect for school-age children to comprehend. This is definitly a must have for the school age child.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By PeaTee TOP 500 REVIEWER on October 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories is amongst Seuss' best works. The stories are poignant. They are all great Read-a-Louds, and they have great rhymes.

The first of the three stories is Yertle the Turtle. It's about a king turtle that decides that his pond is not kingdom enough. He orders his subjects -- other turtles -- to stack themselves so that he can see further; his assumption being that he is the king of all he surveys.

It's actually very amusing to see how many ways there are to interpret this story. A quick trip over to Amazon.com will show you that people view Yertle as everything from simple bossy-boots, to a stand in for Hitler or Stalin. And far be it for me to argue that they aren't correct. And, in fact, this is the power of this story. That it can be understood from different perspectives, so that children can 'grow into' various interpretations.

Personally, my first thought was that Yertle was like the British Aristocracy, while the lowly turtle Mac (at the bottom of the stack) was the American Colonies.

The second story is "Gertrude McFuzz". Gertrude is a bird that is suffering from jealousy. She sees La-La Lee Lou and wants a grand tale like her. In the end though, she comes to appreciate what she has.

The final story continues with the theme of humility and is entitled, "The Big Brag".

The Accelerated Reading designation for this book is 3.3 which means that your average 3rd Grader in the 3rd month of school should be able to read this book themselves without getting too frustrated by words they don't know. [The book can be read to any age, of course.]

The "official" Interest Level is given as Preschool thru 2nd Grade.
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