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YOU'VE GOT TO HAVE BALLS TO MAKE IT IN THIS LEAGUE: MY LIFE AS AN UMPIRE Hardcover – May 1, 1992


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Postema, raised on an Ohio farm, was among the first women to umpire in professional baseball. She worked from 1977 until 1989, beginning at the lowest level in the Gulf Coast League, and then moved steadily upward through A, AA and AAA ballis rest of the sentence redundant?/no, let's stet. readers not specialists on the game will be informed what A AA and AAA ball means, the various leagues. good info.gs , umpiring in the Pacific Coast League, the American Association and the Triple A Alliance. As we're shown here, there seems little doubt that her gender prevented her from reaching the majors, for Postema had to battle not only the demands of the job but also macho posturing and sexist remarks from players, managers and even fellow umpires. In this hard-hitting, revealing expose written with freelancer Wojciechowski, she relates the sorry tale and names plenty of bad guys. Most recently Postema has been driving a truck. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Postema, the first woman umpire to make it to professional baseball's AAA level, recounts her frustrating attempt to break into the major leagues. Her style is personal and intimate, and she starts by telling about her childhood and the factors that led her to become an umpire. She finishes by relating her disappointment as she fails to break the gender barrier in the all-male bastion of the major leagues. Postema introduces some of baseball's administrators and relates entertaining and insightful stories about managers and players. Readers will achieve a new perspective on baseball--that of the struggling umpire who is attempting to maintain control in the face of incredible adversity. Postema does not mention that she is suing major league baseball for sex discrimination. Recommended for sports collections.
- Melinda Stivers Leach, Precision Editorial Svces., Wondervu, Col.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (May 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067174772X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671747725
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,499,684 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

I got to admire anyone who wants to break into a gender biased occupation.
Jim J. Carroll
This is Pam Postema's own story about how she tried to break the glass ceiling in umpiring professional baseball.
C. Sears
Umpires tell stories and Postema has some great ones--unedited and vulgar--but very funny.
William H. Bruening

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Sears on June 11, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is Pam Postema's own story about how she tried to break the glass ceiling in umpiring professional baseball. She is quite candid about her ups and downs, her mistakes and what she learned from them. She also very openly discusses the anti-female bias that still exists in professional umpiring and her umpiring relationship with people who made it to the bigs because the management passed her over.

I'm an amateur umpire, so this book really spoke to me. Pam busted her hump to make it to the big leagues, fighting obstacles all the way, and at the end was washed out because of a senseless guideline. Baseball lost a good umpire and gained a black eye.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William H. Bruening on November 2, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very funny book about the perhaps still rampant sexism in professional baseball. Postema recounts her experiences in trying to become a major league umpire--a goal she nearly reached. Umpires tell stories and Postema has some great ones--unedited and vulgar--but very funny.

The book also has its serious side. Postema career as a professional umpire reveals the deeply sedimented anti-female biases in the great American game. A must read for baseball fans!!!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jim J. Carroll on September 9, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I can only imagine the difficulties Pam must have faced.I got to admire anyone who wants to break into a gender biased occupation. I personally feel there is room in Umpiring,Refereeing(is that a word?)for women.They can be as blind as the men doing it now(just joking)Irregardles this is a very interesting book and not just on the baseball end of it but also on the struggles of womens equality.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Story line interesting and agree that Pam had a extremely unfair uphill battle that ended her career. However, the words she used to tell of her experience would be improved by omitting the profane and filth.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John Ferdinand Behrend on April 10, 2007
Format: Paperback
Written by the very first women to ever do this and i admire her for it and I remember her calling games. Great reading for any umpire. No 1 in my book
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