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Ya-Yas in Bloom: A Novel Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: HarperAudio; Unabridged edition (March 29, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060761636
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060761639
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 6.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (136 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,898,995 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Ya-Ya sisters shimmy on and off stage in this disjointed follow-up to Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, Wells's bestselling novel about the singular friendship and escapades of four larger-than-life Southern women. The author is off to a good start with the tale of how Vivi, Teensy, Caro and Necie met as little girls in 1930, their spunk and liveliness a harbinger of things to come. But the focus on the Ya-Yas' early years soon wavers and the novel is all over the map—here a few tales about the grown-up Ya-Yas, like Vivi's run-in with her son's first-grade teacher, a pompous nun; there a story about Vivi's eldest daughter, Sidda, one of the so-called "Petites Ya-Yas," and her directorial debut at age eight at a Valentine's Day party. A chapter appears out of nowhere from the viewpoint of Myrtis Spevey, a contemporary of the original Ya-Yas, who is so excessively jealous and resentful of the friends that she comes off as a cartoon character. After a vexing 30-year leap, Myrtis's creepy, emotionally ill daughter, Edythe, takes over the narrative, kidnapping one of the Ya-Yas' grandchildren. What begins as a collection of haphazard but entertaining snippets from the Ya-Yas' lives suddenly bumps up against a sober story about a missing child and the lengths to which parents will go to protect their young. Readers may lose patience as even the loose family-album format fails to hold up, but Wells still charms when she focuses on the redemptive power of family love and the special bond that comes from genuine, long-lived friendship.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Bookmarks Magazine

Critics generally agree that the bloom may have left the Ya-Yas. The novel, a collection of vignettes about "the time that [insert: ‘it snowed,’ or ‘we drove to Houston for the Beatles concert’]," is more hodge-podge than its predecessors. The Ya-Yas’ antics seem stale, their child-raising overprotective. Too many characters, a confusing chronological mix of stories, and a muddled tone give the work an ad-hoc feel. Some bright spots will please fans, however. The dialogue and details continue to allure, and The Washington Post praised the novel for its "subversive," hell-raising women. "But it’s not the kind of book," says the Denver Post, "that will be passed from reader to reader, like The Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood."

Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

It looks as if the book was written so fast that NO ONE proof read it.
Clara
The third time Ya-Yas book seems boring; and has way too many characters; - you need the family tree on the book's cover to keep up with the story.
Michael N. Yotz
I found myself skimming the last 100 pages, just so I could finish the book.
Erika D

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Luan Gaines HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 29, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Ya-Ya's in Bloom is Well's third effort to place the quirky Southern ladies of The Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood front and center. With a bit of background gleaned from both previous books, Bloom is instantly familiar through the antics of four little girls who become lifetime friends. Reintroducing their unique friendship, the Ya-Ya's stick to their loyalties through good times and bad. Vivi, Teensy, Caro and Necie first show up as toddlers in 1930, later as their older selves, along with a familiar "petite Ya-Ya", Sidda, Vivi's oldest daughter.

In order to accommodate the plot line, a couple of strange characters, relatively speaking, are inserted into this rarified world, the prickly Mavis Spivey and her disgruntled daughter, Edythe. These two facilitate the plot twist that besmirches Well's Ya-Ya's impressive family album, so far filled with inter-family problems, untainted by the problems of others. Now Wells presents a quasi-mystery, one that tries to breathe life into the story.

Unfortunately, this Cajun stew doesn't have the joy and spice of the Divine Sisterhood, though Wells gives it the old college try. Charming at their most powerful and eccentric, very real women hid a number of serious issues behind the cheerful facade of their bickering and teasing. There was a real sense of generational connectedness that spoke to women, north and south, of the relationship between mothers and daughters and why secrets are kept to protect the innocent.

In their current Ya-Ya incarnation, the dialog, the story line and the characters have almost become caricatures, devoid of the soul that made them such fascinating creatures, warts and all. Even the element of suspense is Ya-Ya'd, turned into foolish ramblings and pale interactions.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Karen Potts on April 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book is less of a novel than it is a collection of vignettes about the Ya-Yas and those around them. I realize I am going against the grain of 99% of those who have written reviews, but I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Rebecca Wells recaptures the spirit and spontaneous craziness of the four life-long friends, and fills in a few blanks in our knowledge, such as how the girls met and became friends in the first place. It might have been better if this book had been marketed as a group of short stories because, although there are some ties between chapters, most of the stories stand alone. I laughed out loud at some of the adventures of the Ya-Yas and their progeny and the book evoked the same sense of enjoyment I felt at being let in on their world in the first two books. This is not a novel in the conventional sense, but it does bring the reader back to the world of these four unconventional women and the friendships which sustain them throughout their lives.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jay Jay on April 6, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I read "Divine Secrets" after resisting its hype. I thought I was too above it all to read a fluffy tale about Southern women. I was a snob about it. But that book drew me in, made me laugh and cry, enfolded me like a blanket. And it resonated with me, which surprised me greatly. I also liked "Little Altars" because I thought Wells was rather brave to explore some of the more disturbing aspects of the Walker/Abbot clan.

So, I certainly did want to like this book. But I was disappointed. Like a bunch of loosely constructed afterthoughts, no substance, it bored me. A hilarious word picture or bon mot here and there does not represent a well-constructed novel. The Christmas play at the end--- ugh! I was actually fidgeting in embarassment.

Time for the Yayas to hang it up, cherie....
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40 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Tina on April 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I won't bother with a recap of this storyline since it has been done by many other reviewers.

I would agree, however, with the reviewers who commented that somehow this book does not have the charm and wit of the previous books.

It is a shame as this book has been a long time in coming, but it may be time to retire the Ya-Yas or at the very least make them alot more entertaining than in this one.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Anon-e-muss on April 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Okay, I finished this book in about two days, and I have to say, I did like it, a lot! The Ya-Yas are so readily identifiable, and I loved the story Sidda told about going to see the Beatles. I laughed out loud!

Why, though, were Myrtis and Edythe brought in to the story? The abduction thing, why? What about Lulu? What about her point of view? We've heard from Sidda, Baylor, and Little Shep, but where's Lulu?

I really hope Rebecca Wells writes another installment, and if so, I can't wait!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rebelgirl on April 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Just finished Ya-Ya's in Bloom and I must say that it's the most disappointing piece of fluff I've read in a long time. She was too lazy to even come up with new stories, they were all the old ones with different people in them, like the woman who's daughter ends up kidnapping a petite ya ya's kid. She just totally lost the edge and emotions that made the other two books so moving and it just ended up a stupid and extremely corny bunch of drivel...two thumbs down!!!

This book is so bad she should be forced to return all of our money!!!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ellis Bell VINE VOICE on July 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
YaYas in Bloom is the disjointed story of the friendship between Vivian (Vivi), Genevieve (Teensy), Denice (Necie) and Caroline (Caro). They meet in 1930: in a doctor's waiting room; in church; and in a movie theater. We've seen this story unfold before: in Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood and Little Altars Everywhere. By the time one reads YaYas in Bloom, the story becomes a trite rehashing of the old. And, as a matter of fact, the stories told within are more like unconnected vignettes, uninteresting and standoffish at best, and lacking the poignancy of the other two books in the series.

One other thing I didn't like about this book was the way in which the stories were told. The largest chunk of the book takes place in the 1960s, when Sidda, her brothers Little Shep and Baylor, and sister Lulu, are young children. For example, there's a rather touching (albeit maudlin) story of how Baylor, aged five and half, goes to the local television station in order to appear as a "Little Buckaroo." We get all these little, fragmented stories, but never hear about these people as adults. And, for some reason, all the stories are about the Walker family, not the other Yayas. Even though there's a very funny story about Vivi running over a statue in front of the church, in which Caro is involved, we never hear Caro's side of the story. How did she feel when she found out her husband was gay? Is a question whose answer I would love to have had explored further. The children of the YaYas, called the Petit YaYas, are mentioned, but don't play a prominent role in the telling of the YaYa story.

YaYas in Bloom is confusing because it switches points of view; when the narration is first person, one can never tell who is speaking until several pages in. Is it Vivi? Siddalee?
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More About the Author

Rebecca Wells is a novelist, actor, and playwright. She is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Ya-Yas in Bloom, Little Altars Everywhere (winner of the Western States Book Award), and Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood (winner of the American Booksellers Book of the Year Award, short-listed for the Orange Prize), which was made into a feature film. She performs from her work internationally, and her books have been translated into twenty-three languages. A native of Louisiana, she now makes her home on an island in Puget Sound, Washington, with her spaniel and three sheep. Her website is: www.rebeccawellsbooks.com.