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  • Yamaha P80 88-Key Graded Hammer Effect Digital Piano
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Yamaha P80 88-Key Graded Hammer Effect Digital Piano

by Yamaha

Available from these sellers.
  • Great keyboard for home and stage performers
  • Graded hammer effect sounds just like a piano
  • PC interface for computer connectivity
  • Two-track sequencer for composing
  • Ultra-slim and lightweight design
2 used from $749.99

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Product Details

Product Manual [1.98mb PDF]
  • Item Weight: 37 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 37 pounds
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • ASIN: B00005U7SC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #142,342 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: September 4, 1973

Product Description

Product Description

Whether you're practicing at home, playing with the band, or doing a live solo performance, the Yamaha P80 88-Key Graded Hammer Effect Digital Piano offers the features you need. The P80 boasts superb acoustic and electric piano voices, along with a number of other essential instruments such as organs, bass, and even strings. Thanks to the "graded hammer effects" on this keyboard, the action is as close to that real thing as you can get. Leave it to Yamaha, a world leader in acoustic pianos, to develop a keyboard with action that's virtually indistinguishable from the real thing. Just as on a traditional acoustic piano, the keys of the lower notes have a heavier touch, while the higher ones are more responsive to lighter playing. The keyboard's sensitivity can even be adjusted to match your playing style.

Amazon.com

Whether you're practicing at home, playing with the band, or doing a live solo performance, the Yamaha P80 88-Key Graded Hammer Effect Digital Piano offers the features you need. The P80 boasts superb acoustic and electric piano voices, along with a number of other essential instruments such as organs, bass, and even strings. Thanks to the "graded hammer effects" on this keyboard, the action is as close to that real thing as you can get. Leave it to Yamaha, a world leader in acoustic pianos, to develop a keyboard with action that's virtually indistinguishable from the real thing. Just as on a traditional acoustic piano, the keys of the lower notes have a heavier touch, while the higher ones are more responsive to lighter playing. The keyboard's sensitivity can even be adjusted to match your playing style.

The P80 delivers heavyweight performance in a slim and lightweight design. Weighing in at a mere 37 pounds, this digital piano is ideal for gigging musicians or those with space constraints in their home. Although the P80 might be slim in size, it is not slim on features. The P80 is loaded with a 64-note polyphony and a substantial inventory of voices including classical, jazz, rock, strings and more. The P80's onboard sequencer lets you record an entire performance and play it back at the touch of a button. After you're satisfied with your first track, you can go back and record a solo or backup part using the two-track sequencer.

The P80 also features MIDI in/out connections, and a "to host" port, which allows for single-cable connections with computers and other supporting devices. These advanced interfacing capabilities make the P80 a great choice for use as both a MIDI controller/sound source and a live-performance instrument.

Other features include dual headphone outputs, allowing for easy instructional and collaborative use; a sustain pedal; a detachable music stand; and a built-in metronome. Conveniently positioned front panel controls are also provided for immediate access to tuning, transposition and brilliance settings.

What's in the Box
Yamaha P80 88-Key Graded Hammer Effect Digital Piano, music stand, sustain pedal, PA-3B AC adaptor, and user's manual.

Customer Reviews

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See all 9 customer reviews
Great digital keyboard for beginners or teachers.
scuba08801
The sound is near enough to a real piano, the action is close enough that skills transfer, it is easily portable.
Tom Rose
IMHO as good as, or better, than many of the Roland or Korg units which are priced much higher.
Big Jack

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Tom Rose on February 18, 2008
When I needed something portable for silent practice of classical techniques and repertoire my choice was the Yamaha P80. It is the best compromise. The sound is near enough to a real piano, the action is close enough that skills transfer, it is easily portable. The only drawback is that it needs headphones or external speakers. If you want something with built in speakers so that it is usable just as it is, as a self contained unit, you will need to look at other offerings in the Yamaha range. Compared to the offerings from other makers it was the long sustain of the Yamaha sound that made it stand out for me. Looking at the other features: 64 note polyphony makes the pedal usable even for things like long glissandos - in fact it is better than Yamaha's own Silent System Grand pianos which offer only 32. Then factor in the price and I could not see the point of paying more for any of the pianos "higher up" Yamaha's range which sounded at best marginally better, and felt exactly the same to play. The other extras - other instruments, built in metronome and recorder, MIDI output are just icing, though for some they will be key features.

However, the advertiser's claims that the sound and feel are identical to an acoustic piano are way over the top. The sound is always recognisably electronic, and becomes more so as you hear more of it during hours of practice. It is especially so when you play staccato, sforzando, or with pedal. And the action is quite unique, better than an organ or early electric piano, but still unlike an acoustic piano. Despite the weighted keys there is no sensation of a "bite-point" at which the hammers are launched, and there is always an unnatural, slightly springy feel to the return of the notes.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Big Jack on June 6, 2006
great practice instrument esp if you live in an apartment or need off-hour practicing. Outstanding simulation of a weighted keyboard. A little heavy to be a true portable (probably around 40 lbs, maybe double that with a rolling hardcover case), but a terrific instrument for practice and most uses. IMHO as good as, or better, than many of the Roland or Korg units which are priced much higher. (I am not a Yamaha employee when I say this.)
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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful By scuba08801 on October 9, 2003
Great digital keyboard for beginners or teachers. Weighted keys add a realistic feel and provide finger strengthening. Full sized, with 88 keys, from low A to high C. Control Panel allows adjustment of volume, metronome, demos, record & playback, voice/variation, effects and reverb. Keyboard can connected directly to MAC or IBM/PC compatible computers via the MIDI IN/OUT connectors and a MIDI interface...
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By divbyzero on April 10, 2011
I used my P80 for several years, but ended up replacing it with a Roland RD-700SX. In its favor, the piano sound was great, and I used it successfully on one of my albums. Unfortunately, the initial positive impression of the keyboard weighting wore off when I realized that the action was much heavier and slower than both grand and upright acoustic pianos by Yamaha; so much so, that it caused actual pain in the fingers. However, the deciding factor was that it spent so much time in the repair shop, as the keys kept breaking... they would go down, but not come back up by themselves. I may be a vigorous player, but this happened under more or less exclusively studio use, with no gigging abuse.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John C. Bresnik on July 28, 2009
I've had my P80 for over ten years now -- on occasion I will go to our local "Guitar Center" and try the new keyboards. I'll stick with my old P80 -- feels and sounds very close to an acoustic. In fact, after playing an acoustic here and there, I prefer my P80.

It has a variety of piano sounds, a couple organs and other piano-like sounds... plenty for me. I have been playing the piano since 1951 and worked as a jazz musician for nine years (1955-1964) -- have played on some really bad pianos. But, this one is consistent... sounds good all the time. Plus I like the transposing option ... so I can play Body and Soul in C and have it come out in D-flat (it's beyond me why Johnny Green wrote that in D-flat... guess he wanted to give the piano player a work-out).

If you're mainly interested in a good piano "sound" then this keyboard will work for you. A little heavy for gigs, but it's worth hauling it around ... great sound.
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