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149 of 154 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best in class digital piano if you are concerned about learning to play correctly
I recently did an exhaustive review of the digital piano world as I am trying to teach my children to play the piano. Accoustic pianos are not a choice due to the size, weight, cost, and tuning requirements. I love the idea of a piano that is always in tune (and can move if we move), but I wanted to be sure I was teaching my kids in a way that they could easily play a...
Published on October 21, 2010 by Joel Avrunin

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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Warranty caution
The board is OK, but warranty is an issue at the least in Canada. Speaker died within 3 weeks, between dealer and Yamaha it has been in the shop waiting for a part since February, now It's May and I still don't have it. I don't know if it's an orphaned product, or Yamaha Canada is indifferent to customer service, or both, however this is my experience and I regret not...
Published on May 4, 2012 by blue


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149 of 154 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best in class digital piano if you are concerned about learning to play correctly, October 21, 2010
This review is from: Yamaha P155 Contemporary Piano with Mahogany Top Board; Black (Electronics)
I recently did an exhaustive review of the digital piano world as I am trying to teach my children to play the piano. Accoustic pianos are not a choice due to the size, weight, cost, and tuning requirements. I love the idea of a piano that is always in tune (and can move if we move), but I wanted to be sure I was teaching my kids in a way that they could easily play a grand piano if presented with one. The biggest concern is muscle memory, and making sure their fingers are used to the feel of a real key.

Roland makes some of the top-of-the-line pianos, but they also come with a high cost. I am sure the sound might be a bit better, but I could not justify the expense. I tried out some of the higher-end Yamaha pianos, and while I was impressed, still was shocked at the cost. The P85 was the lowest cost Yamaha piano I tried that seemed it could be good for teaching. It sounded nice, feature the weighted keys with "graded hammer standard" (GHS), and was reasonably portable. However, I felt the P85 keys were a little hard to push with a little too much return. I had a higher-end Yamaha nearby (non-portable) and found the keys much better. The store also had a grand piano, and the higher-end Yamaha was much closer than the P85.

With a little research, I discovered that the high-end Yamaha pianos (the ones that cost $2k and up) use "graded hammer effect" (GHE), a step up from GHS. Since the discontinuation of the P-140, the P-155 is the least expensive piano to support GHE. It also has 128 note polyphony, 14 voices with 4 tonal varieties, and support for a sustain pedal (you only need 1 pedal for most playing).

What are the downsides to the P-155? Some other digital pianos have far more voices, more recording capability, and louder speakers. The P-140 only had 6-watt speakers. This was improved with the P-155 (12W speakers), but it is still not the best.

For the class of piano that this is, the improvements do not justify the price upgrade from the P-140 to the P-155, but if you are just starting out, there's no better piano for the price. And if you can get a good used deal on a P-140, it will be just as good.
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65 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top notch portable piano., November 14, 2009
By 
SOu "fylloxera" (Brooklyn, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Yamaha P155 Contemporary Piano with Mahogany Top Board; Black (Electronics)
After a year owning the Yamaha YPG 235 (still love it), I decided to move up to something more substantial, with weighted keys. My first gut reaction was a Kawai or Yamaha Clarinova, but the cost was a bit high, and I didn't like the fact that it was not portable. I wanted the features without the cost (typical consumer). So I looked at the P155.
This keyboard comes with 4-level AWS sampling, 128 polyphonic and GH effect (Yamaha's best) weighted hammers. The features are in line with mid-level Clarinovas. Yamaha did a great job reproducing there top of the line grand piano, trouncing the YPG-235 and the YPG-635. There are subtle sound effects from a real piano reproduced, making the whole experience very realistic.
The keys are extremely accurate, but somewhat heavy. The change over from the graded-tough YPG 235 to a super weighted keyboard took about 5 days. The advantage is being able to play on a real piano without the fatigue, now that the muscle in my hands have bulked up.
This machine has real MIDI ports, 12 Watt speakers, 1/4" plug connectors for an amp, and up to (2) headphones. It has a USB port for storing songs onto ONLY. You cannot use this port for anything but storage (like a USB pen drive). The unit will format your "drive" to Windows FAT, but it is writable-readable on MAC/LInux . You will need a MIDI to USB adapter if you want to play on your computer.
Overall, I feel (as a novice still) that I took the right course, buying the YPG-235 and now the P-155. The P-155 is truly a mid-level professional stage piano, at a very fair price. The quantity of samples (instruments) is not as much as the YPG-235, but the trade-off is a really superior instrument.

Made in Japan. (Ok, Made in USA would be better....but it's a Japanese piano company)
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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yamaha P155 Digital Piano, September 20, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Yamaha P155 Contemporary Piano with Mahogany Top Board; Black (Electronics)
I'm a jazz pianist and I've owned the Yamaha P-120 Digital Piano since 2004. Overall I was very pleased with it. However, recently one of the keys began to stick, which prompted me to call Yamaha for a service center location and price quote to fix the key. When I received the quote, roughly $130, I asked if the sticking key was an anomaly or if that was something that just occurs with the age of the piano. I was told that there would probably be more keys going out.

Inferring that I would eventually need to replace the piano, I started looking into purchasing a new one. My research led me to the P-155, the replacement piano for the P-120. I read all of the information provided by Yamaha (features, specs, etc.) and reviews from other customers to get a perspective on the instrument. I decided that it would be a good choice and purchased it. I was not disappointed.

Yamaha has made many advances since 2004:

Using Yamaha's "Pure CF Sampling" technology, in my opinion, they closely captured the sound of their CFIIIS 9-foot concert grand piano. The result is an "incredibly authentic grand piano sound".

The "Dynamic Stereo Sampling (DSS) technology" gives you 4 levels of piano samples for a fuller dynamic range and tonal expression. Depending on how hard you strike the key you will hear one of four piano recordings. This new technology, coupled with the GH (Graded Hammer) technology that existed in the P-120, make for a "true feel of a grand piano keyboard action".

On Yamaha's website they mentioned the "Stereo Sustain Samples and Damper Resonance" features. The sound reproduction of the open strings (Stereo Sustain Samples) is very impressive. However, I have not heard the "Damper Resonance" aspect where you hear the recording of "a felt damper coming to rest on a vibrating string". (Note: For some strange reason the pedal that allows you to hear that feature, the FC3 pedal, is optional. The piano comes with the FC4 pedal. I now own the FC3 pedal and heartily recommend it.)

When performing, the internal amplifier and speakers are enough for small venues. However, for larger venues I use two Behringer K1800FX amplifiers in stereo, which give me the full range of the piano and covers most performance venues.

I've had my P-155 piano, with the mahogany top board, for roughly three months now and I'm quite pleased with it.

So, if you're looking for an outstanding digital piano at a reasonable price, the Yamaha P-155 is a great choice.
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58 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Practice Piano, Nice Sound, Good Features, February 9, 2010
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Dont expect a big difference in sound quality over the P-140 or you will be dissapointed. At most there may be an ever so slight increase in micro-dynamic expressiveness on softer, subtle passages (maybe that's the 4th layer?), but dont expect anything to jump out at you. I mean subtle! Not much difference in the decay versus the P-140. About the same. I owned them both. The action is heavy and responsive on the P-155 (same as P-140) which I like and the features are an improvement over the P-140. Given how inexpensive and small digital memory has become, it would be nice if Yamaha could give us a DP with a natural sounding decay instead of a looped one. On a real piano the harmonic overtones decay faster than lower fundementals. This sonic reality has not been incorporated into this instrument unfortunately. The P-155 does sound resampled, just not enough to show a really audible difference from the P-140. At soft levels its pretty good but at mezzo forte or louder decay is unnatural, like the P-140. Sound quality via the built-in speakers is the same as P-140. Dynamic range and volume is a little better because of greater wattage but thats about it. Speakers and frequency range are unchanged. Unlike P-140 you can choose brightness levels in between Bright, Normal and Mellow for a total of 5, not 3 choices which is nice. If you can get one for $1,000 or less its worth it but I wouldn't spend 1200 on it over the P-140, unless you need the new features.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very pleased with the action and sound, January 1, 2011
By 
John E. Pugh "Pughimag" (Durham, NC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Yamaha P155 Contemporary Piano with Mahogany Top Board; Black (Electronics)
I have owned a Korg Concert 2000 digital piano for over 15 years and what a solid piano that has been. I gave it to my grandson because it was too heavy for me to carry around and I want my grandchildren to have music in their lives. I then owned a Yamaha P70, which was nice and light but did not have any bells and whistles and had a noisy keyboard (when sound is turned down). Also it had no 1/4 inch jacks. The piano sound was not too bad and the action was pretty good also. I ended up giving to my granddaughter. Next I purchased a Casio PX330 because it had some really nice features and it is quite light. I had tried it out at the store and found it to be quite good. When I got it home and started playing classical music I found the keyboard to be too stiff when I was trilling and the mid-section did not sound very good to me. I decided reluctantly to return the keyboard. When I thought about a replacement I listed the following ideal piano for myself (roughly in order of priority):

Weighted keys with an action that is responsive
Very good piano samples (At least two) for regular playing
Built in speakers (preferably 12 watts)
1/4 inch outputs for gigs
Headphone jack
MIDI IN/OUT
USB connection for computer
Transpose capability (e.g., button to go semitones)
Recording capability (To use as a scratch pad when composing)
Under 30lbs
Around a $1000 (or less)
Metronome (Can always use cheap standalone metronome)
Support for flash card storage (when used standalone)
As close to my Kawai RX-7 concert grand as possible in touch and sound (within my budget)

Nice-to-have:
Multi-timbral (I'm pretty focused on piano), especially if good rock organ
Some form of display (Liquid crystal or LED)

Don't care:
Rhythm section
Modulation wheels

I took some music with me and a good set of headphones and went to the nearest decent sized store to try out digital pianos and see what kind of a deal they would make me. I settled on the P155. It is a little on the heavy side to be sure because it's got a heavy particle board base but since I gig very little I can probably work around that. What's important is that the touch and sound are great for when you want to play the piano standalone. It also has the capability to store ideas on a flash card which I like. I am a little concerned about the lack of a USB output for a computer but since the P70 worked fine using a MIDI box (I use an EMU 0404 USB) I think that will likely not be a problem. I like to play Ivory pianos and my wife bought me the Italian grand for Christmas. I also use Cubase for sequencing so the computer interface is important. I am always concerned with latency but I'm pleased to say that the Emu box does not introduce any perceptible delays. So the P155 meets most of my requirements and most particularly in the sound and touch area. Its a plus that they have color options and a number of extra good sounds (Better than some other slabs). It gets my vote.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In a league of its own. Plus Comparison with the P95 and the YDP-181/series, July 13, 2011
By 
Mohamed (COLUMBUS, OH, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Yamaha P155 Contemporary Piano with Mahogany Top Board; Black (Electronics)
>>Updated on Nov-02-2011

I had a Yamaha NP30 then a Yamaha P95 (both sound the same BTW). Then after 1 month I returned the P95 and bought the P155 instead. I have to say that the P155 is miles ahead of the P95. The graded hammer (GH) action in the P155 is Yamaha's best and it is way way much better than the P95's Graded Hammer Standard (GHS) action. In fact the P95 keys feel cheap and plasticy and I was always annoyed with the sounds some of the keys make when I press them down which tells you that it is not a perfect manufacturing process for the P95 by Yamaha as some keys feel and sound different than others (I mean the mechanical feel and sound of pressing down the key). I have to say to that I had the P95 replaced with another P95 before deciding to do the upgrade to the P155, the very first one I received had a major flaw with the F3 key that made it even hard to press not to mention the horrible click sound that it made. All that made me lose my faith instantly in the P95 cause I think that although it sounds really nice but it is not worth the current $549 asking price and that a cheaper Casio or the slightly more expensive px330 ($699) is a way better choice. Anyway, since I appreciate the Yamaha quality, I went for the next GH action keyboard with 4 layers of piano sampling and that was the P155 that is almost double price but it is totally worth it. The YDP-181 digital piano is a nice (stay in its place - looking nice) one that sounds really good without headphones thanks to the wood casing. In terms of specs on paper, the P155 is better than the YDP-181 but something about the YDP-181 makes look/feel nicer although they have the same GH action and the P155 actually has better sampling (4 layers). The YDP-181 is more expensive (currently at $1599) and is a furniture style piano which although is nice looking but didn't fit neither my budget nor my space. My advice is that if you care how your keys feel when you play your digital piano and if you care about the quality of the sound then by all means do not buy a Yamaha less than the P155. Yes that is a thousand dollars but it is worth it.

PS. A note here that the YDP-161 model ($1350) sounded and felt like the P155 (using headphones). The YDP-141 model is the worst that I have tested. The keys are not that good and the sound quality is not that great it is more like a P95.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Keyboard with Limited Options, January 6, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is an excellent keyboard in terms of its tone and feel. I use this keyboard to play and improvise music. I use a Motif XF for creating songs. I love that I can turn on the power switch on the P155 and a second later the board is read to go. When inspiration strikes, as the Motif ad goes, it is probably better to have the P155 than the Motif. The Motif takes a long while (at least when I want to play immediately) to load up and be ready to go, and requires external monitors to create sound. The P155 is ready to go immediately.

The hammer action feel of the keys is very good to excellent, and perhaps offers even more resistance than some acoustic pianos. Feel is another matter, you won't mistake these keys for those of an acoustic, but it's pretty good. The feel of the keybed is far superior to nearly all of the digital pianos that I have used or tried, including the Roland series and Motif workstations, which also have hammer weighted keys. This won't replace either the feel or tone of an acoustic piano, but it's really close, and it is always in tune. Paired with the FC3 foot pedal (which I am not that enthusiastic about), I can achieve reasonable expression from the keys. Without the pedal, the keys have very good expression on their own. I have not used the included FC4 pedal yet. The different settings for the piano sounds, though limited, are very nice and distinct from one setting to the next. Sounds are very limited, but they are high quality, and for playing piano, you don't need that many.

The internal sequencer is quite limited, allowing for only three performances. So, if you like to improvise, you need to connect it to either a computer or an external recorder ( I do the latter). If you're using the built in metronome, that sound will be recorded into an external recorder if recording directly. Otherwise, you have to record the performance directly into the internal sequencer, then play it back into the external recording device in order to record without the metronome sound.

The internal speakers, though quite handy, are not powerful, and lack any sense of presence. The headphone output is a bit better assuming you are using good quality headphones. Don't use high-impedance cans, the built in amplifier can't handle them. I use Sennheiser HD595's and they work well. To take advantage of the board's tonality, you need to connect it to some decent monitors. I often use the keyboard in the late evenings, so the headphone function is nice. I am not impressed at all with the internal speakers, and plan on connecting some external monitors. I will say that when the inspiration strikes, the built in speakers or headphones work just fine.

Build quality is very good. A lot of plastic, but that saves on the weight. The unit is made in Japan. Connections are limited, and if you want to connect it to a computer (there is no direct USB port) or multiple devices (such as monitors and an external recorder) then you need a small mixer and/or MIDI cables. I am currently using an Edirol MMX10 mixer and it fits the bill nicely. I like the silver/cherry finish though it is mainly plastic. The quality of the keybed, of course, is top notch.

In the end, it sounds like an acoustic piano, and its feel is quite close. Though not inexpensive, the feel and tone justify the expenditure.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I've gone through 3 digital pianos this past year - wish I bought the P-155 in the first place, January 17, 2014
This review is from: Yamaha P155 Contemporary Piano with Mahogany Top Board; Black (Electronics)
When I started to learn piano, I wanted a digital piano that was as close at real piano as possible so that I could seamlessly transfer my skills learned in a digital to a real piano. While I have an upright piano in the house, I needed to practice on the digital because I needed to use headphones to no disturb other family members.

In my process of learning, my understanding of how a digital piano needs to feel and sound, to duplicate an real piano has evolved. My impressions of the pianos I've upgraded from are as follows:

1. Williams Allegro: Hitting the keys produces inconsistent volume with middle keys.

2. Casio PX-120: Poor sustains. Not able to support half-damper pedal.

3. P-105: Sound was boomy on the lower note keys. Also keys required a lighter touch than what is typical with a real piano

You might ask why I got these in the first place before settling with the Yamaha P-155. There are two reasons: Price -- and like said, I came to understand more and more critical nuances of what I needed to faithfully duplicate a real piano experience.

With the P-155, I've now spent as much as I'd spend on a high-end laptop computer (not include the costing of all my upgrades). I honestly think I'll be happy with this one for at least a couple years.

In fact, if you read my full Amazon reviews on all the preceding digital pianos I've mentioned above, you'll see that the P-155 is the first one I've given 5 stars.

Here are my impressions after living with this for about a week:

♫♫♫♫♫ WHAT I LIKE ♫♫♫♫♫

► Accurate sound. One of the things I noticed about my previous keyboard was that it was boomy on the low end and the high notes sounded thin. On the P-155, if it wasn't for the coloration from the speakers, it would be hard to tell the difference between this and acoustic piano. Part of the reason is that Yamaha has really to great lengths to do multi-layer sampling at different sound levels for each individual key to capture the true essence of a grand piano. They even have sample the sound of the damper pedal as it touches the strings. From lows to highs, this piano is a joy to hear at every level of volume. If you really want to be impressed check out the technical description of P155 given on the Yamaha site.

► Accurate feel. One of the most important criteria was that the digital piano I learn on, condition my fingers and hand muscles so that I would be a sit down in front of a regular piano and play without skipping a beat. My old P-105 almost got me there, but a regular piano still felt heavier. With the P-155, with its Graded Hammer Technology, you have that same degree of heaviness and momentum you get sitting in front of a Steinway.

► Works with half-damper pedal. To me on-off functionality of standard pedals is unacceptable. The higher-end Yamaha pianos work with the FC-3 pedal which allows you to damper more gradually, just like you can with a real piano.

► Versatility. While all I needed is the piano, the P155 comes with 17 voice and they all are professional quality, light-years more realistic than the toy Casio keyboards I used to play with in the 1990s.

► Preset Songs with teaching mode. There are preset classical pieces which you can play back at an tempo and also remove different parts so you can fill in the right or left hand.

► Great looks. Honestly, the last thing on my mind was to buy a digital piano with the idea of adding a pretty piece furniture to my living room. But surprisingly, with this wood paneled top, the P-155 looks like a elegant and classy -- serious musical instrument.

Initially, when I got my P-155 I made a lot of errors because my hands were not accustomed to the heaviness of the keyboard, That's good because a week later, I'm not only getting acclimated, I'm also supremely excited that, going forward, I will be a better and more confident piano player when down in front of a regular acoustic piano.

If you are a parent with kids starting to learn or if you yourself are just starting out, I recommend that you not skimp in order to save a few hundred bucks like I did. With the P-155, you're in good hands. There are other digital pianos I've tried that are more expensive such as the Rolands. I've also tried all the Casio Privias. Overall, with the P-155, I think I've chose the sweet spot between price and performance.

♫♫♫♫♫ UPDATE 5/28/2014 ♫♫♫♫♫

I'm five months into this keyboard and I continue to marvel at how real it sounds and feels. With my previous digital pianos I felt a need to play real acoustic as often as possible to accurately train my fingers' muscle memory. With the p155, I no longer feel that need because the p155 provide an experience that just like that of an acoustic. So when I sit in front of a Steinway, I have little problem adjusting. This is a keeper.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great digital piano, April 22, 2010
I recently purchased this digital piano from Kraft Music. I have had it for about four months and I have to say I am very pleased with the piano and extremely pleased with the service from Kraft Music. I am not a skilled player but I play enough to want a real acoustic piano. Since acoustic pianos are not practical when you move a lot I wanted to get a full sized digital piano that sounded like an acoustic piano and played like one. I have been very pleased with the P155B. It sounds exactly like an acoustic piano. It doesn't have a lot of unnecessary features like most other digital pianos, but is simple and straight forward. My only two complaints are that you can only record three of your own songs on the piano (at first I didn't even think I'd care about this feature, but given the technology, how hard would it have been to give it enough memory to record several more) and, it still does not have the exact "feel" of playing an acoustic piano. With that said the "feel" is much better than any other keyboard and most other digital pianos I've tested but I think there is still some room for improvement when it comes to the touch of the keys. The keys are responsive to your touch but the weight is still not exactly dead on. Still, I love this piano and really think it is one of the better ones I have seen for the quality and comparability to a real piano. (Also, if you're serious about buying this, go to Kraft Music's actual website before purchasing the product here. They usually have bundles which include the keyboard, stand, bench, pedal, and a few other accessories that altogether costs the same as the piano alone!)

Let me also say that the service I received from Kraft Music was impeccable. Due to some complicated situations I had a lot of trouble getting this piano shipped to me. None of the fault lay on Kraft music but they were extremely helpful and accommodating throughout the whole ordeal. I received one-on-one customer service and the same person dealt with my order (and problem) throughout the entire process. He was very helpful and friendly. I have not experienced customer service like this in years. It is nice to see that it still exists and that there are still business out there that will go out of their way to please their customer. I would most definitely do business with them again.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent dp, at a good price point, March 3, 2010
By 
Carlos (Missouri, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Yamaha P155 Contemporary Piano with Mahogany Top Board; Black (Electronics)
OK, this is our first DP, so we are not experts... Having said that, I tested the hammer action and compared to real acoustic pianos and find the P-155 is quite realistic, even on the heavy side (which I think is good, gives you good strength if you ever decide do go up to a real grand piano!). The sounds it produces are very good (at least the "piano 1", we only goofed with the others---but the others sound good too, the "chorus" sounds really nice playing Beethoven's 9th!). The "piano 1" sound is composed of 4 different samples (for the different sound levels) so it sounds very realistic at all levels of play, from pp to ff. We also like that you can wear headphones and not bother the family if you want to play late at night. Finally, the USB storage allows MIDI files to be recorded and/or brought from a computer to serve as a second pair of hands. The user interface is clean and relatively simple to use.

Overall I am very pleased and I do not think you can get this good quality at a lower price point.

BTW: this piano is made in Japan, always a good sign in terms of quality.
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