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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on September 12, 2012
Verified Purchase
This is a preliminary review. The keyboard arrived today and much more must be explored. Here are the initial observations.
1/ Packaging is good ... arrived undamaged.
2/ Initial setup is a bit confusing as to selecting battery types. The manual is confusing.
3/ Why no AC adapter? This keyboard is often advertised as including an adapter.
4/ Grand piano setting sounds like an electronic keyboard ... no surprise; but hope springs eternal.
5/ The build quality is nice. No cheap or flimsy parts.
6/ Good layout of controls. Logical and mostly easy to use.
7/ So many sounds and voices! More than most would ever want or need.
8/ Keyboard has a nice feel and the velocity control is good.
9/ Speaker sound is good and plenty of volume for living rooms.
10/ Headphone audio is also good and sounds better than the speakers.
11/ LCD display could/should be larger.
12/ One must log onto the Yamaha user website to register and get the song book and that was easy to do.

Summary: Much more to explore as this is a complex product with many features, some of which are subtle. I recommend this product with no reservations! I could easily bump my rating to 5 stars but for the few minor gripes above. Item #4 above is too harsh. It sounds very nice; just not like a grand piano.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on March 14, 2013
Verified Purchase
The Yamaha PSR Series PSRE433 61 Key is advanced but very simple to set up and easy to use.
When I connected a USB cable from the synthesizer to my Macbook Pro, Garageband instantly recognized
that an external device was connected. I was able to quickly configure the settings that enable Garageband
to play the Yamaha sounds and I also played the virtual keyboard sounds back onto the Yamaha.
Fun and educational, I highly recommend this product to both beginners and advanced players.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2014
I've owned the Yamaha PSR-e433 a month and I know it inside-out. I wanted to post my review to give prospective buyers an idea of what this keyboard does and doesn't do. The 61 keys are full size and velocity sensitive but the action is not graded. There's a pitch-bend wheel to simulate note bends you hear with guitars, horns, harmonicas, etc. The bend range is adjustable. The voice bank contains over 700 voices which include drum kits, dual voices, splits, which two voices allocated to two keyboard ranges, and arpeggiated voices. The piano grand voice is passable but not what your going to hear when compared with recent $800 and higher digital pianos. The tenor sax is fantastic , the organs are great too. You can also created your own voice combinations, tweak the reverb and chorus effects, style choice and volumes, and save these settings to one of the 32 memory registrations (8 banks of 4) for quick recall. There are 100 built-in songs that comprise of assorted styles and all are either public domain or Yamaha's in-house compositions. The PSR-e433 also has a "Music Database" button which Yamaha states has 305 "song titles". These are not actual songs but instead are quick, one button setups for songs that approximate popular songs that the "song titles" hint at. Ex: 001 in the database is "JudeHey". The keyboard will automatically select the similar style (drum groove, bass, rhythm) that will provide the auto-accompaniment but you'll actually have to play the song yourself. Why not have the proper title and/or the complete song you may ask? Copyright licensing fees! Of course you can play it yourself (that's the point, isn't it?) and even record 6 track arrangements and store them in one of the ten User Song slots 101-110. You can insert a USB thumbdrive in the back and save your creations as SMF (Standard Midi File with .mid extension) or save the complete "User Memory" of all 10 user songs and registration memory banks. A 2 GB USB thumbdrive will provide ample storage for hundreds of your recorded sequences. The PSR-e433's 6-track sequencer offers no editing other than delete song or track. Make one mistake and you'll have to delete the track and start over again. Sorry but no Puch-In. Sequencers with advanced editing are usually found in keyboard workstations that retail in the $800 and higher range. If this is a must have feature then I suggest you look at the Casio CTK-6200 ($200) which has a 16-track sequencer with delete, insert, copy, step etc. You can also connect the PSR-e433 to a computer and use MIDI sequencer software. I've downloaded dozens of .mid files, copied them to a USB thumb drive and plugged and played them in the PSR-e433. Some sound good and many are very cheesy. Another cool feature is the "Pattern" mode which contains 10 DJ style dance grooves. The "song play" buttons now become 5 pattern variations A through E. You can play the lower bass keys to transpose the key. You can also select your favorite voice and play along with the patterns. There's also a Function button that contains all the changable settings for volumes, reverbs, octave range, split points, etc . . . . The Yamaha PSR-e433 is a fantastic value considering the many features and great sonic quality and if you like to experiment with different voices and rhythm styles then this keyboard will make you sound like a whole band with just a couple of key presses. The one thing that really gripes me is that it DOES NOT come with the AC adapter power supply and this will cost another $20-30 to purchase the Yamaha PA-150 supply. Really Yamaha? The majority of users aren't going to use it with batteries except those who want to play around the campfire or in a marching band. Look out Yamaha because Casio has stepped up their game and they INCLUDE the power adapter. ;-)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 12, 2013
I did a bit of research on Yamaha's site before buying this keyboard from a local music store. My main points of interest were (1) the number of voices included; (2) the price; and (3) other features. After comparing various models, this keyboard was the obvious choice in my price range. The specific features that sold me on it were the pitch bend wheel, two real-time control knobs, and ability to modify some of the sound characteristics of the voices-- the filter cutoff frequency, filter resonance, attack time, and release time. You can also modify the volume, octave, panning, amount of reverb, and amount of reverb for the voices, but those abilities are available on other models, and it was the extra features on the PSR-E433 that sold me. The ability to modify the voices makes it almost like having a synthesizer, especially when using the real-time control knobs to modify the cutoff and resonance!

I do have a few minor gripes. First-- and this is true for just about any Casio or Yamaha keyboard I've looked at-- the way the voices are arranged makes it more difficult to compare similar voices with each other. For example, voices 1 through 10 are piano voices, but then there are additional piano voices at 270 through 276. This is also true for the other voice categories-- electric piano, organ, guitar, bass, trumpet, etc. The reason is because Yamaha puts all the "panel" voices first, then puts all the "XGlite" voices after that. As I said, the same is true with other keyboard manufacturers (such as Casio), and I can more or less understand their reasoning-- but from a user's perspective it would be nicer if all piano sounds were together, then all electric piano, etc., so it would be easier to pick out the sound you want by spinning the dial, instead of having to look up voice numbers in the Data List and then enter their numbers on the number pad.

My second minor gripe is that the functions menu is a little cumbersome to navigate because there are so many functions to cycle through-- 63 in all. It would have been nice if there were more buttons for quickly accessing specific functions, or for jumping from one function category to the next. There are a few buttons for that, such as for selecting the Dual Voice or Split Voice-- but more buttons would have been good.

And my last minor gripe is that it would have been great if the PSR-E433 had a modulation wheel in addition to the pitch bend wheel, as the more expensive arranger workstations do. But in this price range, you won't find a modulation wheel unless you're buying just a MIDI keyboard controller.

So the bottom line is that this is a great keyboard for the price, and I recommend it as an introductory-level "arranger" keyboard. I'm anxious to see what the PSR-E443 will be like. (I assume there will be one, since the PSR-E4xx models have been coming out about a year after the PSR-E2xx and PSR-E3xx models, and the PSR-E243 and PSR-E343 were released this year.)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 9, 2014
I have both E423 and E433. I play E423; my 8-year old daughter took over E433. E433 has 10 modern patterns like Industrial Rock, Dub Techno etc. that’s nice for kids, teenagers, DJ’s. Other than that, they are quite the same. I bought E423 for two reasons – first as a second keyboard for my YPG-635/DGX-640 and second to learn all the features, so when I upgrade to a professional keyboard, I won’t need a long learning curve. It does not have a mechanical action of YPG-635, does not have full 88 keys, keys are smaller, but it’s compact, has more features (voices, arpeggio’s etc.) and I can take it with me when I want to visit my friends and entertain them for a little while. The sounds are top notch, particularly trumpets, trombones, sax, flutes, organs, guitars, bells. You certainly can find the right one for you among 700. You can start playing with one voice, transition to another one, and finish with the third one. You can layer 2 together, you can record, so you can calmly analyze your playing, or produce the piece with multiple instruments, because you can record up to 5 tracks plus one rhytm/style track.

The feature that I used the most is a musical database to play a cover for a popular song. For example, I choose #75 Atonal F1 (in Ballad section), change default voice to Trombone Section, change tempo to 114 and it’s ready to play “You are wonderful tonight” by Eric Clapton. Or #89 Fly Away without any changes to play “I Set Fire to The Rain” by Adele. All you need to play is just chords/arpeggios. You can easily find chords online. The keyboard can show you the notes in a particular chord. In case you want to go one step further, you can choose one of the arpeggios and just play chords. This beast has 150 top-notch arpeggios to meet any taste.

My daughter started by taking regular piano lessons. But I wanted her to learn more than just piano, so she transferred into Yamaha school. This keyboard allows learning orchestration, where you realize the features of various voices / instruments, styles/ rhythms. I’d recommend the Hal-Leonard “Quincy Jones Legacy” book series if someone wants to learn more background on modern music.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 4, 2013
Verified Purchase
This keyboard sounds great for a medium/beginner skill musician. No complains at all about its performance, EXCEPT for one selling detail: It is sold WITHOUT any adapter.
So, you'll have to buy one on your own.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on June 30, 2013
Verified Purchase
Let me start out by saying this Keyboard has features that are found only in much higher priced keyboards.
The sounds are very realistic and the speakers sound amazingly clear.
The options that come standard with this keyboard are unbelievable for the price.
The display could be bigger, but if I spent $1200,00 bucks instead of $239.00 it probably would be.
My wife liked mine so well she wanted one of her own. (So we now own two PSRE433 keyboards).

Don't waste your money on cheaper keyboards. The PSR433 will not disappoint you
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on January 18, 2013
Verified Purchase
Bought this keyboard for my daughter, would like to tell its more than sufficient for a beginner. Sound is amazing quality is top notch.
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on September 4, 2014
Props to Gerry's earlier review for pointing out that you can't change the chorus depth while holding down organ (etc.) notes. But there ARE a few workarounds for adding some expression to held notes:

One is to rotate the Pan and Ultra-Wide knobs, which provide some cool effects that do continuously vary held notes.

The other is to open the Function menu, select Chorus Type (#035), then rotate the big dial to alternate among the "Off," "Chorus 1," and "Chorus 2" settings. This will also continuously vary held notes. "Chorus 1" is the most pronounced, so rotating to that position from "Off" or "Chorus 2" will add a slight swell.

The newer PSR-E443, intended as an "upgrade" to this model, actually removes the very useful Pan knob assignment option. (Instead, you get a melody-suppressor pan control for the Aux-In jack. Much less useful.) You can't use the big Function dial as a substitute -- it doesn't respond fast enough, and has no center detent.

The 443 does add iOS connectivity, so if you pay for a pricey connector, you can use an iPhone (with Yamaha's free Sound Controller app) to assign virtual Mod wheels to multiple parameters.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 22, 2013
Verified Purchase
I just got this keyboard, but so far I have found it to be a superior product for its price range. Great sounds and functionality. You wont go wrong with this one.
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