Qty:1
  • List Price: $5.99
  • Save: $0.60 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Yang the Youngest and his Terrible Ear Paperback – January 1, 1994


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.39
$1.95 $0.01

100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Frequently Bought Together

Yang the Youngest and his Terrible Ear + Esperanza Rising
Price for both: $9.79

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
  • Esperanza Rising $4.40

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 700L (What's this?)
  • Series: Yang
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Yearling (January 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440409179
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440409175
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #166,115 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Newly transplanted to Seattle from his native China, nine-year-old Yingtao is a tone-deaf thorn among musical roses. His parents--professional musicians both--assume the problem is lack of practice and chide him for playing baseball (he's a natural) when he could be rehearsing with his virtuoso siblings for an upcoming family recital. When Yingtao hooks up with a new friend from school, a boy as talented musically as Yingtao is athletically and whose parents have put him in an opposite predicament--the boys scheme a "lip-syncing" violin switch for the recital quartet that finally opens the eyes of both families. Peppered with wry commentary on the often baffling experience of adapting to a new country and a new language, Beijing-born Namioka's fresh and funny novel serves up a slice of modern, multicultural American life. Her comic timing and deadpan delivery are reminiscent of Betsy Byars, and her book will leave readers begging for more. Dekiefte's keenly observed black-and-white sketches evoke a maximum of expression with a minimum of intrusion. illustrations not seen by PW. Ages 8-12.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-6-- Poor Yang Yingtao. From the moment he was born, nine years ago in China, his parents expected him to be as talented as his siblings and complete the family string quartet. The trouble is, he's tone deaf, but his family won't believe it. He knows he will let them down at the upcoming recital for his father's music students, when the string quartet is supposed to play a grand finale, impressing the audience with Father's skill as a teacher. The stakes are high. Yingtao's family has recently immigrated to America and his father, who plays violin for the Seattle Symphony, desperately needs more students to augment their meager income. Yingtao's friendship with curly haired Matthew eventually saves the day. Matthew's family regards his love of the violin with suspicion, wishing he would work harder at baseball. Joining Matthew at practice, Yingtao discovers he's a natural athlete. Namioka uses their growing friendship to explore cultural differences and the problems of adjustment to a new society with a light but sure touch. Warm, humorous black-and-white sketches illuminate each character with casual, but astute, perception. Simpler and less incisive than Bette Bao Lord's In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson (HarperCollins, 1984), which is set in an earlier era, this multicultural music and sports story will have a broad appeal for young readers. --Margaret A. Chang, North Adams State College, MA
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 28, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is very funny and enjoyable. I read it just after it was published. My brother doesn't want to read it, but that's because he's a Nintendo addict. I wish he'd try it because he plays the violin and is almost as bad at it as Yingtao is. Young readers and young musicians will love this book, and kids who don't like to read should give it a chance-they'll like it too. Enjoy!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on August 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
Being the youngest member of a talented family can be a hassle. You're constantly compared to your older siblings. It's difficult to get any respect. You struggle just to get your voice heard. Yingtao, the youngest member of the Yang family, has it even worse though. Not only are all his older siblings talented in the ways of music, but his mother and father have dedicated themselves towards the art and find the notion that Yingtao is tone-deaf inconceivable. How could this happen? Whatever the cause, the family has bigger issues than their youngest child. They've moved to Seattle from China and money is a constant concern. Yingtao, meanwhile, befriends a boy named Matthew at his school who's problems are the exact opposite of Yingtao's. Where Yingtao only wishes to play baseball and is instead forced to practice the violin, Matthew is forced to remain on the baseball team while in his heart he years to play a fiddle of his own. By putting their heads together, the two boys come up with a plan that will free them both from their family's expectations. IF they can pull it off.

Lensey Namioka skillfully pilots a potentially tricky plot into easy reading territory. Kids who are comfortable with chapter books but still shy away from 500 page fantasies may find comfort in this unprepossessing little story. Yingtao is a likable narrator, describing his inability to play the violin in tune with humor and resignation. He obviously knows his family very well and is far more forgiving and far-sighted than they are when it comes to individual flaws. Namioka handles the contemporary Chinese immigrant experience with a sure hand. There's a great moment where Yingtao and an Asian-American student have a serious miscommunication as to the origins of the other.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A 9-year old reader on January 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
In this boook, Yingtao Yang has a very very talented family. He has two sisters and one brother. Both his mother and his father played in an orchestra back in China where they lived before moving to Seatlle Washington, where this book takes place. Yingtao Yang plays the violin. Yingtao's brother,(Eldest Brother) and father also play the violin. His oldest sister,(Second Sister) plays the viola and his ten year old sister,(Third Sister)plays the cello. His mother plays the piano. Everyone in his family has a very very good ear. Except Yingtao. His father now taeches violin when he isin't in the orchestra. He is an altrnate in the orchestra.Yingtao's father says at his recital there will be a string quartet with all the Yang children, as the last peice,and Yingtao is afraid he will ruin the recital with his screechs on his violin. Then he and his new best freind, Matthew Conner who likes to play violin, do something very dangerous and sneaky at the recital..............
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By domino@the-spa.com on April 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is great! My students and I have enjoyed it. It is funny and yet serious. There are many topics for discussion. I will definitely be reading it to next year's class.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cheh Carmen on November 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
When I read the first page,I roared with laughter.The whole Yang family had an ear for music except Yingtau,the youngesr Yang in the family.Poor Yintau.He tries to play his instrument,the violin.Soon,he got to know a friend,Matthew who knows how to play base ball and is a beginner in music.Yingtau learns to play baseball and loves the game very much.Yingtau's father is having a recital to encourage children to come to his music class.But Yingtau is afraid that his screeching violin will ruin it.I feel very desparate for him and I wish that I could take a famous violinist and put it in his place.But I wouldn't tell you what happened after this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Yazmin on July 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
Yang the Youngest and His Terrible Ear is a great book for teaching cultural diversity, acceptance, family values, and commitment. The novel is geared for students in grades third through fifth. I enjoyed how the plot unfolds as each character is developed. I appreciated the author's use of weaving American and Chinese customs into the story. Readers will sympathize with Yang as he tries to please his father through deception. I enjoyed the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
Yang the Youngest is a boy who wants to play baseball, but his parents want him to work on his violin playing. The only problem is that Yang has a terrible ear and isn't good at music. Yang's friend Mathew wants to play violin, but his parents want him to play baseball. I didn't like the book because I like books with battles, nature and history in them. This book didn't have any of those.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
Yang the Youngest was an OK book.It was sort of boring and didn't grab my attention.In the beginning, there was nothing really happening.I only found out that a boy named Yintao was tone deaf and his parents made him play the violin. Since all his siblings played their instruments very well, he was expecteed to also

In the middle of the book, Yingtao found out he had to play in a concert with his siblings. He and his friend Matthew make a plan that Matthew will play his violin insted of Yingtao. Matthew would be behind a screen and Yingtao would "bow synk". This part was a little better.

At the end, Yingtao's and Matthew's plan is underway, and it didn't work out so well.This book is boring.I would recomend this book to people who like music.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?