Yankee Girl and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Yankee Girl Hardcover – April 11, 2004


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, April 11, 2004
$4.20 $0.01

100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 11 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 6
  • Lexile Measure: 550L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR); 1st edition (April 11, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374386617
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374386610
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,263,316 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-8-Alice Ann Moxley's father works for the FBI and has been transferred from Chicago to Jackson, MS, in 1964 to protect civil rights workers and individuals registering to vote. Taken aback by everything from Southern accents to the way black people are treated, Alice finds it very hard to adjust and nearly impossible to make friends. She's quickly branded "Yankee Girl," and the one friend she finds, the boy next door, abandons her when school starts-late this year, due to fear of integration. Alice's school is indeed being integrated, by two daughters of an important ally of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Valerie Taylor is in Alice's sixth-grade class, and although they are both outsiders, Alice is torn between trying to befriend her and trying to fit in with the popular girls. As the civil rights movement heats up, the Ku Klux Klan begins to focus on Alice's family. It takes until spring for her to sort out her inner conflicts, and by then tragedy has occurred and her reality has been shattered. Chapters begin with dated headlines that build a framework for the story. Some of the language is troubling, but it's also appropriate and adds to the increasing tension. Constant references to the Beatles embellish the '60s flavor, and the dialogue and narrative flow naturally. In an author's note, Rodman reveals that she lived this story 40 years ago, and readers who make it past the dull cover art will live it as well.-Susan Oliver, Tampa-Hillsborough Public Library System, FL
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 4-8. Based on the author's experience as a white child of an FBI agent who was sent to Jackson, Mississippi, in 1964 to support the fight for civil rights, this first novel brings the terrifying racism close-up: the name-calling (including the n-word), the cruel segregation, the Klan violence. Alice ("Yankee Girl") Moxley, the new girl in school, is desperate to be accepted, but she knows how much worse it is for her classmate Valerie, the only black student. Introducing each chapter, newspaper headlines chart the political struggle, but the honesty of Alice's narrative moves this beyond docu-novel. She's much more concerned with the Beatles and clothes than with politics--but the racism is always there. She admires a classmate who challenges the in-crowd, but Alice is not a noble freedom fighter; she likes Valerie and talks to her, but only when no one else is around. The real tension is whether Alice can move from being bystander to standing up for what she believes. Rodman shows how hard it is. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Barrett on October 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Mary Ann Rodman hasn't forgotten what it's like to be eleven, when the longing to fit in sometimes conflicts with doing the right thing. Her re-creation of childhood is timeless, although the setting of the fifties rings true in subtly-woven-in details that anyone who lived through the era will recognize but that younger readers will not find intrusive.

Rodman creates three-dimensional characters with realistic problems and personalities. There are no easy answers as Alice Moxley, the book's heroine, struggles with big issues like integration, smaller issues like finding a date for the Class Day party, irritation with her parents who are so caught up in their worries and stresses that they forget that sixth grade is just as stressful as adult life.

Young readers who have to walk the narrow line between doing the right thing and fitting in with their peers, whether the issue is integration or any other problem, will find much to relate to in Alice.

Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By George E. Stanley on August 5, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mary Ann Rodman's Yankee Girl is one of the most powerful novels for young people I have ever read. I literally could not put it down. I think I would have felt the force of this book even if I didn't know that the author actually lived this story in 1964 Mississippi - and even if I had never been in Mississippi myself one summer to visit my wife's relatives where I actually felt that "thick syrupy air that smelled of pine sap and cut grass." 1964 was a year of racial turmoil, especially in the Deep South, and Alice Ann Moxley's father, an FBI agent, is sent from Chicago to Jackson, Mississippi, to help deal with the crisis. That means that Alice Ann and her mother are also thrust into an "alien" culture. It's especially difficult for Alice Ann because she has to contend with the students in her sixth-grade class which is just about to be integrated. Mary Ann Rodman has captured, pitch perfect, the clash of cultures: Alice Ann's Chicago life and the life of children of Southern parents who don't want "Yankees" telling them how to deal with their "nigras." The author doesn't try to sanitize any of the language or any of the incredibly mean and hateful behavior toward African-Americans of the time. This is a book which has received a lot of recognition, winning many state awards. It is also a book which has angered a lot of people, but those are people who didn't want their deep-seated racial prejudices exposed. America will never solve its racial problems unless more people like Mary Ann Rodman lift all the rocks and dead tree branches under which bigots hide not only from the light but also from enlightenment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sharon L. Goodman on February 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I compliment Mary Ann Rodman for the excellent job she has done writing Yankee Girl. I remember these turbulent years, and am impressed with the accuracy reflected in this author's work.

Moving from the North to the Deep South, Ms. Rodman's young protagonist, Alice, is not prepared for the conflicting experiences she must come to terms with.

Though her parent's beliefs are deeply ingrained in Alice, her actions do not always reflect them. While her parents face their own challenges, Alice yearns for social acceptance from her southern classmates.

Mixing subtle humor with deadly serious social circumstances requires a careful hand. Mary Ann Rodman has done a fine job accomplishing this goal. I believe that upon finishing this entertaining page-turner readers of any age will leave the world of Yankee Girl better equipped to deal with life's inequities and more willing to help resolve them fairly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Without flinching the author embeds the reader in her authentic portrayal of the plight of a Northern 11 year old suddenly finding herself ensconced in the deep South at the time of the Civil Rights movement. Alice, the all too human protagonist is caught in the customs of the locale where she desperately wants and needs friends, despite the negative of her concealed empathy for Valerie, upon whose shoulders has fallen the mantle of integration in Alice's new school.
Despite the heavy subject, the story sparkles and entertains with wry humor and attention to detail of the '70s through the human frailties of adults and classmates alike.
Alice learns by experience and practice what theory has provoked during those dangerous and unsettling times. The story is touching as Alice comes to terms with her own deficiencies and climaxes finally with her action.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Linda on September 15, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Thank you, Mary Ann Rodman, for sharing your first hand knowledge of the time and place described in this book. I appreciate your use of authentic dialogue and not insulting the intelligence of your youthful (and not so yourthful readers) by resorting to the political correctness that is such a plague in our society today. I could feel the turmoil in Alice's mind and heart as she struggled with her conflicting desires to be accepted and popular and true to her own heart. You have a rare gift for characterization. I look forward to your future books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Angela Moore on August 27, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An interesting point of view about the race issues in 60's Mississippi. A girl from up North moving to the South with her FBI father during the start of integration.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search