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Yankee Gold [Kindle Edition]

Elizabeth Wall Rogers
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.99
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Book Description

Passion, power, politics--intrigue on the frontier.

A young attorney with a secret leaves the Missouri Civil War for the southwestern territories and is threatened by a bitter rivalry. At stake are the fortunes of land grant settlement and the destiny of New Mexico.

An abolitionist in a slave state, Steve Elkins’ principle puts him at odds with local authority and general practice. Steve’s vision of what a territory must be to attain statehood sets a pattern for his personal goals. Patience, diplomacy, and skillful use of his legal expertise guide him. As the war ends, party identities re-form and tensions increase. Steve faces vicious attacks in his aggressive moves against slavery, robbery, assassination, murder, and cattle rustling. When he's faced with a personal crisis and a crucial election at once, can he strike a bargain with his wife, Sallie and his best friend, Tom? He struggles for a private life while the exertions of his public role erode his quest to achieve a business environment for New Mexico.

Can Steve Elkins survive the clash between his allies for a railroad; and the traditional fears, loyalties, and envy of native Mexicans?


Product Details

  • File Size: 440 KB
  • Print Length: 245 pages
  • Publisher: Story Merchant Books (December 12, 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00ANN2UFW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,397,321 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intricate and Historic June 15, 2013
By GiGi
Format:Paperback
This is an impressive novel by Elizabeth Rogers, which takes place within the backdrop of the worst war on American soil. It is a historically accurate narrative that achieves forward motion in its intriguing plot line. Rogers successfully exhibits a difficult conflict within a gradually remorseful climate.

"Fire and smoke concealed the movement of people in the street. It was unclear whether the moving bodies were civilians, enemy, or allies. Occasionally, there would be a clearing."

Steve Elkins begins to blur the lines of societal acceptance. He is an abolitionist attorney in a less than tolerant territory. Though he is brave enough to stand up for his beliefs and politics, it also causes a major hindrance in his personal life.

There is a definitive coyness when delving into the incredibly intricate story line. It prevents the reader from understanding the true focus of the ultimate ending. Yet, gradually, as the characters play into the metaphorically sanctioned subplot, Steve Elkins must decide where his loyalties lie.

Read the entire review here:
bookendchronicles DOT blogspot DOT com
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book through years of research April 26, 2013
Format:Paperback
YANKEE GOLD A Novel
by Elizabeth Wall Rogers

OVERVIEW (FROM AMAZON)
Passion, power, politics--intrigue on the frontier.

A young attorney with a secret leaves the Missouri Civil War for the southwestern territories and is threatened by a bitter rivalry. At stake are the fortunes of land grant settlement and the destiny of New Mexico.

An abolitionist in a slave state, Steve Elkins' principle puts him at odds with local authority and general practice. Steve's vision of what a territory must be to attain statehood sets a pattern for his personal goals. Patience, diplomacy, and skillful use of his legal expertise guide him. As the war ends, party identities re-form and tensions increase. Steve faces vicious attacks in his aggressive moves against slavery, robbery, assassination, murder, and cattle rustling. When he's faced with a personal crisis and a crucial election at once, can he strike a bargain with his wife, Sallie and his best friend, Tom? He struggles for a private life while the exertions of his public role erode his quest to achieve a business environment for New Mexico.

Can Steve Elkins survive the clash between his allies for a railroad; and the traditional fears, loyalties, and envy of native Mexicans?

REVIEW:
The author wrote a historical learning book about a territory that strove to become a state. It tells how some f the people in New Mexico resisted statehood. They did want all the good things that went with it though. During this time the Civil war made the mining of precious ores difficult. When the character Steve Elkins came into the picture, martial law was in effect. The Army was being paid to protect private mining and was doing a little mining themselves.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved Yankee Gold July 31, 2013
Format:Paperback
Unlike most stories of the Old West, this one focuses on a real figure, Steve Elkins, who is not a U S. Marshal, a gun-toting lawman. The story begins as he arrives in New Mexico, under cover, as a teamster. He has been sent to register two mines, joint projects between private investors and the local government. He is persuaded to stay by the Indian Superintendent. The Indian agent explains to Steve that the Army's general in charge of martial law in the territory is abusing local citizens. Steve witnesses the Navajo tribe's journey on foot to a reservation in central New Mexico in the story's fist scene. Since Steve is an abolitionist, a former Union officer and spy from Missouri, he is already antagonistic to General Carleton and his officer in charge, Colonel Frank Chaves. He agrees to "try out" New Mexico, with reservations.

The story brings to light the gold and silver mining operations the Army carried out in New Mexico and other southwestern territories to pay for the Civil War. Steve becomes a member of the legislature from a Democrat county despite the fact that he is a Republican abolitionist. New Mexico has long survived by using peons(debt slaves, mostly Indians) for its hard labor. Steve has a charismatic personality and is a quick study. He learns Spanish so quickly that citizens are amazed. He is modest, and it turns out, an attorney, He advances to become U.S. Attorney. He goes up against an entrenched aristocracy among large landowners benefiting from unsurveyed land grants. His driving force is to atone for spying on his Confederate friends, and even family, in Missouri.

I give this book five stars.
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More About the Author

Born in the Bronx, New York City, she lived in several states during World War II and one of the nation's tough financial eras. From Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a parent's illness resulted in the family's settlement in nearby West Virginia.

Always fortunate in finding the right direction, she was a recent university graduate working in New York City. Invited to Long Island by friends of a relative, she left her Greenwich Village neighborhood for Grand Central Station on an April 1960 Sunday morning. She arrived in the vast concourse and chose a booth for platform directions. The young man in the window studied her for a moment and asked, "Are you Beth Wall?" After a moment of stunned silence, she asked how he knew. He had spent the previous evening with the family she would be visiting. It was a defining moment which was repeated with many favorable connections she would make throughout her life.

Beth's research into New Mexico's frontier history was triggered by an interest in the background of Stephen B. Elkins, a noted political figure of the post-Civil War period. Her own father, born in Cuba, was Spanish speaking like Elkins. She worked for LIVING magazine and was a parent activist in public education in West Virginia. Her active writing began when her analysis of a new school program was published in Charleston newspapers. She has written two unpublished novels, taught middle school for three years, sold real estate in North Carolina, and served as a clerk and courtroom deputy for the U. S. Court of Appeals, 4th Circuit in Richmond, Virginia where she resides.

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