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A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen: Easy Seasonal Dishes for Family and Friends Hardcover – May 21, 2004


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A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen: Easy Seasonal Dishes for Family and Friends + The Complete Italian Vegetarian Cookbook: 350 Essential Recipes for Inspired Everyday Eating + How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (May 21, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618239979
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618239979
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 1.1 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #35,612 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Cook's Illustrated executive editor Bishop largely succeeds in removing the tarnish from vegetarian cooking, sharing simple, seasonal dishes that make the lack of meat seem like an afterthought. Bishop's no-nonsense attitude toward tofu leads into a series of recipes that call for browning the tofu, then coating it with a pan sauce, such as Pan-Glazed Tofu with Thai Red Curry Sauce. The majority of these dishes can be thrown together at the last minute, such as Wilted Spinach Salad with Japanese Flavors, and Chard Burritos with Tomato-Chipotle Salsa; the few that are more labor-intensive (Orange Risotto Cakes with Pistachio Crust, for example) and are worth the effort. Many of the dishes have Italian or Mexican influences, and Bishop arranges recipes by season. Occasionally it's not clear what connects a dish to its season, (why is Fettuccine with Caramelized Onion Sauce a fall meal?), and there is some repetition: spring's Chickpea Patties with Arugula Salad hardly vary from the Herbed Chickpea Patties with Israeli Salad that appear in summer. There are odd lapses, too, such as a sidebar on blending puréed soups that neglects to mention immersion blenders, and a recipe for Root Vegetable Tarts with Rosemary that calls for a 14-ounce package of puff pastry, then uses only half of the package. Largely, though, the inventiveness of Arugula and Pear Soup and Tender Lettuce and Peach Salad with Pumpkin Seeds and Sour Orange Vinaigrette far outweighs those puzzling blips. These are excellent recipes for alluring food. 16 color photos.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

JACK BISHOP is the executive editor of Cook's Illustrated and a principal cast member of the PBS television show America's Test Kitchen. He is the author of The Complete Italian Vegetarian Cookbook and Vegetables Every Day. He edited American Classics and Italian Classics, which won IACP Awards in 2002.

More About the Author

Jack Bishop is the editorial director of America's Test Kitchen. He joined the staff of Cook's Magazine in 1988 and helped with the launch of Cook's Illustrated in 1993. He established the tasting protocols used in America's Test Kitchen and has authored dozens of articles for the magazine. Jack directed the launch of Cook's Country magazine and oversees editorial operations at both magazines. He edited the The Best Recipe (1999) and established the book division at America's Test Kitchen. Jack is the author of several cookbooks, including A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen, Vegetables Every Day, The Complete Italian Vegetarian Cookbook, Pasta e Verdura, and Lasagna. Jack's wife, Lauren Chattman, is a cookbook author and former pastry chef. They have two daughters.

Customer Reviews

The recipes are well presented and easy to follow.
Carol T. Baker
The most outstanding virtue of the book is that, true to the title, the recipes are organized by season.
B. Marold
I highly recommend this to anyone who wants to enjoy this variety of cooking.
Margaret H. Huyck

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

203 of 206 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on May 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
On several counts, this is a better than average vegetarian cookbook by veteran author and Cooks Illustrated executive editor, Jack Bishop. The most outstanding virtue of the book is that, true to the title, the recipes are organized by season. This is a popular notion these days and several books have done it already, but it is doubly appropriate to a vegetarian cookbook. Mr. Bishop decides to divide things into the four seasons rather than splitting things up more finely as others such as Albert Portale have done in one of his books.
The second virtue of the book may actually be a requirement for a seasonally organized book. This is an additional table of contents organized by type of dish. The categories so organized are Soups and Stews; Lighter Salads; Main-Course Salads; Sandwiches and Tortilla Dishes; Pasta and Noodles; Rice, Grains, and Couscous; Beans and Lentils; Eggs; Tofu and Tempeh; Pizzas and Tarts; Vegetable Main Courses; Side Dishes; and Accompaniments. I am not up on all the finer distinctions in the vegetarian / vegan world, but the presence of distinctly eggy dishes such as omelets, frittatas, and souffles tells me that Mr. Bishop is on the liberal end of the vegetarian spectrum.
The third virtue of the book is the great variety in foods used in the dishes and in the great variety of ethnic influences. Italian pastas, frittatas, beans, and veggie dishes are cheek and jowl with lots of Middle Eastern, South Asian, Southeast Asian, Chinese, Japanese, and Latin dishes. Tofu, miso, grains, and couscous are given prominent roles in ethnic dishes. I have seen some vegetarian cookbooks that claimed to declaim classic dishes with virtually no rice dishes represented. True to his `best recipe' background from `Cooks Illustrated', Mr.
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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Kay on February 10, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book is organized into seasons, so the author is assuming that you won't be interested in buying produce that is not at its freshest (meaning most of the produce from a supermarket in the winter). Most people are very aware that tomatoes in the winter are terrible and there is no point in buying them. This is the basis behind this cookbook. If you are the type of person that loves shopping at specialty markets like Whole Foods and love to visit local farmer's markets or have a garden in the summer this book is perfect for you.

The recipes are fairly straight forward and uncomplicated, and they don't tend to call for a lot of ingredients so what is absolutely imperative for having the recipes turn out wonderful is using the best ingredients possible. For instance if a recipe lists fontina cheese, don't use the cheap $7 a pound stuff sold at the supermarket. You need to go to a reputable cheese counter (like Whole Foods) or a cheese shop and pay the $15 a pound for the real stuff, Fontina Val d'Aosta. If you aren't the type of person that is willing to do that type of shopping, these recipes may seem bland to you. I will add that when he uses expensive ingredients he doesn't tend to call for a lot of that item, so a little goes a long way.

So far I have prepared quite a few of the winter recipes and a few of the fall ones. All of them have been very good and a few have been spectacular and have become new family favorites like the caramelized onion pizza with blue cheese and walnuts and also the vegetarian chili that uses chipotles in adobo sauce and a good 12oz beer. I can't wait for spring and summer when my own garden and the farmer's market are in full swing so I can try recipes from the other seasons.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By kn_s VINE VOICE on February 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the cookbooks I pull out every few days, and have no hesitation in cooking from it

even for the first time for guests -- Ingredient lists are simple, so you will have an idea of the tastes to expect from just reading the recipes. And yes, that means you use top quality fresh ingredients as another reviewer mentioned because there are no rich sauces etc usually to hide mediocre produce. Its great everyday healthy fare, that you don't mind repeating, and truly kid pleasing as well.

Because its arranged seasonally, I usually realize that I've picked up some ingredient which stars in a nearby recipe that week at the farm market and thats a great way to combine menus when we have extra folks at the table and also to please picky eaters who may not like a particular flavor...

And his salads have such lovely unique flavors, everyone at the table is asking for seconds and recipes to take home.

I also love his menu combinations listed at the beginning which are a fool-proof way to combine for entertaining friends. I find that I turn to his cookbooks the most because the base ingredients like olive oil are heart friendly. I used to love Mollie Katzen and then Deborah Madison, but while I still turn to Deborah Madison for the truly wow cooking occasions, I stick to this for everyday because of the light, family friendly approach and the fact that you can usually put a meal on the table in a couple of hours.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Kristin on June 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is the best vegetarian cookbook I have bought. The recipes are all based on what vegetables are in season and the recipes are really tasty. The recipes are easy to prepare and appeal even to picky eaters like myself. You need this cookbook!
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Most Recent Customer Reviews