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Yeast: The Practical Guide to Beer Fermentation (Brewing Elements) Paperback – October 16, 2010


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Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

From the foreword: "...loads of sound information and techniques that will work for brewers at all levels, from beginning homebrewers to production brewers at any sized brewery. Included are fantastic tips for working with all kinds of yeast strains and beer styles, introducing new strains, and how to use best brewing and lab practices to keep your yeast healthy and your beer tasting great."

Mitch Steele, Head Brewer/Production Manager, Stone Brewing Company

About the Author

Chris White is Assistant Professor in Sociology based in the Department of History, Philosophy and Social Science, The Rhode Island School of Design. Jamil Zainasheff started brewing in 1999 and soon started winning awards in homebrew competitions. He has brewed beers in every style recognized by the Beer Judge Certification Program, taken medals in the finals of the National Homebrew Competition every year since 2002 and amassed more than 20 Best-of-Show awards. He contributes articles to Zymurgy and is the Style Profile columnist for Brew Your Own.
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Product Details

  • Series: Brewing Elements
  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Brewers Publications; 9/16/10 edition (October 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0937381969
  • ISBN-13: 978-0937381960
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (138 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,656 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 66 people found the following review helpful By G. Schmidt on January 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a pretty good home brewing book. It's NOT a yeast biology textbook or a yeast-ranching manual, though, and I think the other recent review is a bit unfair in its expectations. (If you're looking for that kind of information, it's out there. Start with George Fix.) It is technical enough to get its point across without requiring me to dig out old college textbooks to understand its references.

If you're an intermediate- to advanced-homebrewer, this is worth having. (True beginners should probably concentrate on big-ticket techniques first.) It will teach you everything you need to know to get the best performance out of yeast purchased from reputable sources and help you shepherd it through a typical 4 or 5 generations.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A. Colombo on January 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After reading the other reviews I was a little unsure if purchasing this book would apply to homebrewers. After reading this book extensively I believe that this is an excellent starting point for homebrewers who want to learn how to culture and store their own yeast. The other reviews are correct, there are a few basic introduction chapters in the beginning but the vast majority of the book is an extensive guide on yeast culturing practices from start to finish. The author(s) do an excellent job explaining concepts and procedures in a clear way giving the reader a step-by-step guide, with some photographs.

The authors give examples of how commercial breweries grow up their yeast to pitchable rates, but the vast majority of this book is written for homebrewers who are working in 5 and 10 gallon batches. Everything is covered in detail, from washing and rinsing yeast harvested from a primary fermentation vessel, pitching rates, yeast starters, harvesting yeast, storing yeast, preparing slants and petri dishes and streak plating yeast cells to grow and isolate different colonies. For those homebrewers who think that yeast culturing is way too much of a headache and prefer to purchase a new vial of yeast from the store for every batch, please give this book a chance and see how easy it is to culture and isolate your own yeast. The author(s) do an excellent job of describing how complex a brewery laboratory can be, but they do an even better job of teaching the homebrewer to use the exact same techniques at home using nothing more than a pressure cooker, agar, dry malt extract and a wire inoculation loop.

If you are a homebrewer who is just starting out and are using extract and partial mash recipes then perhaps yeast culturing is too large of a next step.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By G. Mesick on January 21, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was put off by some of the early reviewers of this book, who didn't find it as useful as they had hoped. And, perhaps partly because they had lowered my expectations--but mostly because of what I read in this book--I am overjoyed with what I found.

This book divides brewing into two parts: the brew day, which it calls the "hot side" (which it does not really cover), and what happens after you boil your wort, which it calls the "cold side." This is what the book focuses on. It's about yeast, sure: what they are, how they work, what happens to them under various conditions. But it's really about fermentation, this cold side: the way we control those various conditions to get yeast to do something we want them to do: make great beer.

And in its focus, White and Zainasheff hammer home the need for repeatability--same amount of yeast, same temperature, etc.

I think they are on to something. And if you suspect that your beer could stand some time and attention spent on this cold side of brewing, there is a wealth of knowledge here. For example, if you had to brew all your beers with just one yeast, what would it be? Two? Three? etc. How many yeast varieties should you try to maintain (based on how often you brew)?

This book treats the reader seriously. That means whether you are doing 5 gallons at a time with malt extract or running a microbrewery, the assumption is you want to make the best beer possible--and that fermentation control is key. I did have to smile at the chapter title "Your Own Yeast Lab Made Easy." And yet, for all the high-tech possibilities mentioned that might make your head spin and your wallet empty, there were many simple, free approaches to controlling and measuring your beer.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John Sikking on December 16, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A lot of information - more than I will use. The Internet and John Palmer's book provide the steps required to make a yeast starter, this book includes a few good charts (how much yeast to make), but again this is readily available online (Mr. Malty). It goes into yeast storage, but not long term storage, as in how can I freeze this yeast so I don't have to pay $6+ a pop every time I brew. All in all a book I may reach back to for some notes, but your money is better spent elsewhere (like a 2L flask, stir plate, etc.).
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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful By R. Mooney on March 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
I was really anticipating this book which may have unreasonably raised my expectations.

The first half of the book can be reasonably skipped by most people who have had almost any brewing experience and felt somewhat like filler to me.

The second half where there was actually some discussion of techniques and process was interesting. I would recommend this book to serious homebrewers for the second half, if only as a reference to help learn what you should go lookup in more detail. If nothing else the last couple of chapters are a decent survey of most basic yeast handling techniques. If it had been about as long, but more process and technique information it would have been better for my purposes.
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