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Yellow & Pink Hardcover – Bargain Price, May 12, 2003


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Hardcover, Bargain Price, May 12, 2003
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$196.95

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--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • ISBN-10: 0374386714
  • ASIN: B000F9RK8Q
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,698,204 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“In Yellow & Pink . . . Steig has created a pair of characters who seem the embodiments of his bright esthetic. Named for the colors of their freshly painted costumes, Pink and Yellow are wooden dolls left out to dry in the sun. They are odd fellows, bumpkins, incorrigibles, clowns, countrymen of Beckett’s Vladimir and Estragon, Laurel and Hardy. Philosophers both, they no sooner ‘awaken,’ come to life, than they begin to ponder by what means they might have arrived in this world. ‘How,’ Yellow demands . . . ‘could anyone make something like me, so intricate, so perfect? Or, for that matter, like you.’ . . . One marvels at the expressiveness, the nearness to animation, of Steig’s vibrant drawings.” – Leonard S. Marcus, The Washington Post Book World
--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Caldecott Medalist William Steig is the author and illustrator of numerous children’s books. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts.
--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

William Steig (1907-2003) published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968, and received the Caldecott Medal for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble (978-1416902065) in 1970. His works also include The Amazing Bone, a Caldecott Honor Book, and Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, both Newbery Honor Books. His most recent books published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux are Shrek! (released by DreamWorks as a major motion picture) and Wizzil, illustrated by Quentin Blake. School Library Journal named Shrek! a Best Book of 1990 and said of it, "Steig's inimitable wit and artistic dash have never been sharper or more expertly blended."

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Jay W. Richards on August 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Our five year has hundreds of picture books. But, every night since we purchased this book, she's asked us to read it again. And when we're done, she yells, "Again!"

We're happy to oblige, because it's a delightful book. Steig manages to capture complex, quirky moods and expressions in his marionette characters with an unparalleled economy and simplicity. The dialogue is witty and urbane, without leaving the preschooler behind. The story touches delicately on the perennial and perhap most interesting philosophical question we can ask: Why are we here?
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is very easy for children under the age of 5 to understand. Yet, 10 year olds will like it too. I have been giving this book as gifts for many years. Perfect occasions are for baby showers, birthdays, Christmas and birth arrivals. The creation message is subtle yet obvious. You wonder why more people don't think creation just makes plain common sense. The Lord will speak to the parent's heart as they read this story to their children.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have to laugh when they say this book is for baby to preschool... this is for everyone! I can't imagine a better book to answer the timeless question : 'where did we come from?"... this book is another gem from Mr. Steig.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By "dvillhard" on July 17, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I never thought I'd approach the subject of divine creation vs. evolution when I read this book to my preschooler and Kindergartener in a coffee shop. But, they had a lot to say (and question) about our existence after I read them this book! William Steig does it again -- impressing both parents and children with his witty but simple style that takes on challenging subject matter.
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34 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Dave Telford on August 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
It is a fun book. It isn't preachy. It isn't overt. It isn't a lot of things, but it will make your kids think. If you are of the evolution variety, it is a good opportunity to show the differences between this situation and nature. If you are of the creationist variety, it is a good opportunity to show the similarities between this situation and nature. But to dislike this book because because you think it is propaganda? That's silly, and probably indicates that we shouldn't examine issues critically, no matter what we believe. I enjoyed it. Your kids will too.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Yellow & Pink is a delightful book about two toys questioning how they came to be. The author uses humor and common sense, making a great argument for intelligent design.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 12, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is a terrific book for teaching a complicated subject. Cute illustrations and texts that make both children and adults question the theory of evolution. Your children can be taught logic and discernment at such a young age with this book. Highly recommended to all. A great introduction to intelligent design for any age. I have read this both to my 4 year old and 8 year old. Both enjoyed it and can see the fallacies of evolution.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By M. Goulding on September 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
William Steig introduces an ingenious twist into the old creationist parable of the complex, functional machine (a pocketwatch, a jumbo jet) that might or might not have assembled itself by an astronomically improbable accident.

The twist is this: the machine in this story is a sentient humanoid. There are actually two of them, respectively painted yellow and pink. They are marionettes, like Pinocchio, complete with all human faculties except the faculty of reproduction. As my three-year-old pointed out, they are essentially Robots. The pair engages in a philosophical discussion about whether or not they could have "just happened." Defending this hypothesis, the yellow marionette speculates at length about an astronomically improbable series of morphogenetic accidents, glibly dismisses mysteries of their physiological perfection, and ultimately admits that the details of their origin can never be known. Then their Creator comes along, picks them up and carries them away. Apparently now both totally convinced that they "evolved," they don't even realize who He is...

The genius of this retelling is that the intelligently designed and created artifact is here granted the gift of humanity. This reminds us of what we are really talking about: yes, we are having this emotionally charged debate about the origin of Man (and by the way, of other organisms). Casting the artifact as a mannikin, moreover, serves dramatically to focus attention on a paradoxical contrast: the marionettes are at once far, far simpler than organisms (far simpler even than a pocketwatch) and far, far too complex to have happened (twice, it is pointed out) by accident. This double contrast poignantly illustrates astronomical scales of complexity and improbability.
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