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Product Details

  • Actors: Joan Allen, Simon Abkarian, Sam Neill, Shirley Henderson, Wil Johnson
  • Directors: Sally Potter
  • Writers: Sally Potter
  • Producers: Andrew Fierberg, Cedric Jeanson, Christopher Sheppard, Diane Gelon, Fisher Stevens
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: French
  • Dubbed: French
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 encoding (US and Canada only)
    PLEASE NOTE:
    Some Region 1 DVDs may contain Regional Coding Enhancement (RCE). Some, but not all, of our international customers have had problems playing these enhanced discs on what are called "region-free" DVD players. For more information on RCE, click .
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: November 8, 2005
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000B6CO5C
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,326 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Yes" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Featurette: Finding Scene 54
  • Photo gallery

Editorial Reviews

Passion has no boundaries. A woman (Joan Allen), feeling betrayed by her husband (Sam Neill), turns to a man from a world away (Simon Abkarian) to fulfill her deepest desires. Their sensuous affairtakes them on a tumultuous journey across continents and cultures that is seen through the eyes of her maid (Shirley Henderson). YES, a lyrical love story directed by Sally Potter (The Man Who Cried, The Tango Lesson, Orlando), will arouse your emotions and capture your heart long after the last frame fades.

Customer Reviews

Characters are felt real, conflicts are palpable, and most of all, storytelling flows like visual music.
Charlie
She and He enter a passionate love affair, as she does not receive the love that a living organism desires and he has no one to embrace in his lonely arms.
A Customer
I can see how some people would not like it because of the Poetic Prose, BUT I found that to be what "made" the movie.
N. Selich

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Rijiji on January 4, 2006
Format: DVD
I highly recommend the movie Yes.
I saw it just today and I confess,
That having had today four teeth removed
I spent the day with films and never moved.
Of all the shows I saw, this was the best,
Though if you're (rightly) loath to be impressed
By my opinions, drugged-up and fatigued,
I've reasons that I thought you'd be intrigued:
The dialogue, which flows like seven seas,
Is served in rhyming couplets, much like these,
With iambs counting five in every line.
Delivering the lines, it sounds divine:
The actors speak like poets, to a word;
Pedantic sing-song speech is never heard.
The themes it treats are numerous and strange-
There's death and sex and carpe-diem change-
But love is at the center of the tale:
The confidence that passion can prevail,
The perfect beauty of the spoken word,
The conflict of who will and won't be heard,
And silent cleaning girls who, while they cleanse
Send piercing gazes through the camera lens
(Including one whose speech bookends the show,
Whom Moaning Myrtle's Potter fans will know).

In short: O fans of pentametric verse!
All films, compared with this, seem much the worse.
Its muselike powers I can answer to;
It moved me to perhaps move all of you
To see a movie willing to be art,
To thrill the ear, illuminate the heart.
And does it, in its goal, meet with success?
My answer is, of course, a fervent Yes.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Wordtoaster on January 14, 2006
Format: DVD
Yes is a cinematic masterpiece. As observed by others, not always positively, Yes is nothing short of contemporary Shakespeare. The iambic pentameter dialogue is delivered so deftly many viewers do not perceive the rhyming for the first 15 or 20 minutes of the film.

Like Shakespeare, profound observations are suggested by minor characters, such as cleaning people. Like Shakespeare the dialogue is effused with wonderful wordplay, humor, intelligence and zesty sex.

Since Yes was written for the screen, layers of content are given visually; like the fact that the cleaning people, for the most part invisible to the primary cast as in real life, are the only characters to address the camera/audience directly.

Sally Potters genius is compounded by the lush visual texture of this film as well as her incredible ambient soundtrack -- I wish I could buy it. My one critical comment is that the dialogue is sometimes difficult to hear. Turn up the volume, this is a profound work.

Let's face up to it, if you enjoy mainstream TV, this movie probably isn't for you. This isn't Friends and Survivor simpleton dreamtime. Art demands the investment of thinking.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jenny J.J.I. VINE VOICE on October 23, 2006
Format: DVD
"YES" is basically a gigantic poem. This is one of those efforts that can easily divide viewer's right down the middle and unless you're familiar with the director and into independent films in general this can be a challenging viewing experience. Story is set in London where we see a completely bored woman (Joan Allen known only as She) in a miserable marriage to an English politician (Sam Neill) and one night while at a dinner party she catches the eye of a restaurant cook. He (Simon Abkarian) is Lebanese and instantly starts to flirt with She and it doesn't take long before both of them are head on into an affair but the one thing that seems to stand in their way isn't her marriage but the difference in nationalities.

These are characters dealing with life from opposite ends of the spectrum. While She examines sperm cells and eggs under a microscope, He, we later find, is a qualified surgeon from Beirut, now reduced to chopping meat in a restaurant. The couple's erotic and tempestuous affair examines cultural identity in post 9/11 London (significantly, filming started on 12th Sept 2001 and it was released shortly after the London bombings).

Ultimately, it's a film about saying "YES" to life and how diversification adds poetic substance to our otherwise stale lives. Even the microscopes used by She to examine our multiplying and mutating genetic code have a life of their own, the lenses appearing as bulbous alien eyes under their dust mask covers. Dirt here is not something that can be swept away, but is regenerative and needs to be confronted. Images of cleaners occur throughout the film, frantically trying to clear up the emotional mess the characters leave in their wake.

The camera work look like it was right out of film school and was a bit annoying.
Read more ›
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By N. Selich on July 27, 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a beautifuly written movie which makes sense. (Why and how the characters fall in love, as well as the personal lives of each character) there are NO flaws in the character development.

I can see how some people would not like it because of the Poetic Prose, BUT I found that to be what "made" the movie. Shows the writter's brilliance and the intellect and personalitie's of the two main character's shines through with a difficult script. Perfectly cast. I really love this movie!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Alcee Arobin VINE VOICE on December 28, 2005
Format: DVD
I think that many of the reviewers of this film contradict themselves. They degrade it as unnecessarily complicated and yet further degrade it as empty, lacking the depth of its aspirations. One reviewer compares it to Shakespeare. Why? Most assume that if a film is to do something as bold and intricate as welcome its entire dialog into iambic pentameter then the director, in her annoyingly avant-garde quest, must fashion some otherworldly vision, something that will "change the way movies are made!", as they say. And YES, I agree, some of the rhymes do fall flat (the reviewer from Japan mentioned the surgical reference), but as I saw it, the rhyming was merely a vehicle to give this lush film a refined elegance and the will to take heart with elements of the fantastic. And why are we so hesitant to allow or accept such a thing? What would have made the surgical reference more acceptable had it been said in prose? Moreover, why don't we all walk around speaking in a sly, well thought-out rhyming pattern? It would be difficult, and would limit our ability to communicate, but then, aren't the most important things those that don't need to be said, or rather can't? What if when speaking to our lover we spoke only in a delicately chartered melody and relied simply on our ability to feel and understand one another to leave the rest unsaid? Language is utterly unimportant, it gets in the way. If people used their feelings more than their mouths I suspect unhappiness would not be as widespread. Take the scene in the film when She demands that her husband argue with her, and he correctly queries as to the point. They know the way they feel, and words, no matter how heated or infused with passion, could never express what needs to felt, not heard. And yet, even our characters understand this.Read more ›
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