Qty:1

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.38
Learn More
Trade in now

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Yes, Minister: The Complete Collection
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Yes, Minister: The Complete Collection


List Price: $59.98
Price: $29.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $29.99 (50%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
8 new from $27.19 2 used from $29.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
4-Disc Version
$29.99
$27.19 $29.98

Last Chance Deals in Movies & TV
Save up to 58% on select Movies & TV favorites including Planes, Fawlty Towers, Mary Poppins: 50 Anniversary Edition, and more on Blu-ray and DVD. Learn more


Frequently Bought Together

Yes, Minister: The Complete Collection + Yes, Prime Minister: The Complete Collection + Fawlty Towers: The Complete Collection Remastered
Price for all three: $74.97

Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Actors: Paul Eddington, Nigel Hawthorne, Derek Fowlds
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Box set, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 4
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: BBC Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: May 20, 2003
  • Run Time: 613 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00008DP4B
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,220 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Yes, Minister: The Complete Collection" on IMDb

Special Features

Documentaries: Profile of Sir Nigel Hawthorne Featurette: Short history of Yes Minister Interviews: co-writer Jonathan Lynn (also director of My Cousin Vinny)Documentaries: Profile of Sir Nigel Hawthorne Featurette: Short history of Yes Minister Interviews: co-writer Jonathan Lynn (also director of My Cousin Vinny)Documentaries: Profile of Sir Nigel Hawthorne Featurette: Short history of Yes Minister Interviews: co-writer Jonathan Lynn (also director of My Cousin Vinny)Documentaries: Profile of Sir Nigel Hawthorne Featurette: Short history of Yes Minister Interviews: co-writer Jonathan Lynn (also director of My Cousin Vinny)Documentaries: Profile of Sir Nigel Hawthorne Featurette: Short history of Yes Minister Interviews: co-writer Jonathan Lynn (also director of My Cousin Vinny)Documentaries: Profile of Sir Nigel Hawthorne Featurette: Short history of Yes Minister Interviews: co-writer Jonathan Lynn (also director of My Cousin Vinny)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Yes Minister: The Complete Collection (DVD)

Amazon.com

The elegant sitcom-cum-farce-cum-sophisticated political satire Yes, Minister sets off Paul Eddington's Jim Hacker, Minister for Administrative Affairs, against Nigel Hawthorne's discreetly obstructive civil servant Sir Humphrey. The pilot episode, "Open Government," is curious in that it contains opening and closing credits different from and distinctly inferior to the rest of the series. You also sense that Mrs. Hacker was originally intended to have a larger role, with comedy focusing on the clash between political and domestic commitments, until the writers wisely decided to focus on the stand-off between Jim and Sir Humphrey, with Derek Fowlds's mousy private secretary Bernard making occasional interjections.

While Sir Humphrey is at times a little too sinister for sitcom consumption, all the series' classic features quickly show up: Hacker's occasional Churchillian bombast, followed by panicky double takes when flummoxed, and Sir Humphrey's unflappable verbosity as he brings the dead weight of civil service bureaucracy to bear against Hacker's naively optimistic schemes for open government and slashing red tape in episodes like "The Economy Drive." It's ironic that when Yes, Minister was first screened in the '80s, it was during the rampages of early Thatcherism in which government had never been less like the ineffectual politicking satirized here. --David Stubbs

Customer Reviews

This is one of the five best British comedies I have ever seen.
Eleanor Knaz
Yes Minister and its sequel, Yes Prime Minister are simply brilliant satire of politics, manners, social classes, and Britain.
grouchy
It is subtle British humor, making fun of politics and politicians.
Jean B.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

95 of 95 people found the following review helpful By Tiggah on November 19, 2003
Format: DVD
It is high time this outstanding britcom (plus its sequel, Yes Prime Minister) was released in its entirety on DVD, but it was well worth the wait for the BBC has done an outstanding job. It contains all twenty-one 30-minute episodes (which ran from 1980 through 1982) in a beautifully packaged four-disc set. The quality of the picture is very crisp and clear for a 20-year-old production (I know I'VE never seen it look so good!), and the DVD extras are a real treat.
This is an intelligent, extremely well-written series--a satire of the inner workings of government. Sources within the government provided the writers with all the fodder they needed, and it is highly accurate in its depiction of the corruption, politics, red tape, and manipulation that forms an integral part of the administration of government (ANY government, mind you--which is what gives this series such universal appeal). Indeed, Margaret Thatcher, herself a fan of the series, referred to it as being a "closely observed portrayal of what goes on in the corridors of power."
The series opens with Jim Hacker (played by the late Paul Eddington (Good Neighbours), who sadly died of skin cancer in 1995 at age 68), who has just won the parliamentary seat for his riding (his party has won the election), being appointed as the new Minister of Administrative Affairs. Now that he's in a position of power (or so he thinks!), Hacker has high hopes for making some positive changes--things like instituting an open government policy, linking honours to economies for civil servants, and so on.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By "Big Band" John on July 12, 2003
Format: DVD
Though done in the 80's Yes Minister is as fresh and funny as it was 20 years ago! What makes this series great is there isn't a weakness to be found. Nigel Hawthorne is Brilliant as Sir Humprhey and Paul Eddington as the bewildered yet good-intentoned MP James Hacker. Casting was perfect for these roles.
At the same time, the supporting cast was mostly overlooked, including the "3rd lead" Derek Fowlds who plays Bernard, the MP's undersecretary who seems torn in allegiance between Civil Service and his MP. While the first season also had some great moments outside of Parliament, later series removed the emphasis on Jim Hacker's home life, which served well early on, but could of weighted down the series as it grew.
Another strength is that the series had no real political affiliation. It didn't matter the issue, it found a way to have fun with it and cause mayhem.
Often Imitated, Never Duplicated. This is the gold standard for Political Comedy.
On the DVD specifics, do enjoy the special on Nigel Hawthorne on the 4th disk. I just hope that they can put together a similar tribute to Paul Eddington on the release of Yes Prime Minister.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Super70s.com on June 12, 2003
Format: DVD
I love Fawlty Towers, but for my money Yes Minister/Yes Prime Minister is the funniest sitcom I have ever seen. While most of the humor is political in nature, you don't have to be a C-Span junkie to get all the jokes. You also don't need a background it the British political system (though it helps) as political corruption is universal. Indeed, this show was a worldwide hit and is being aired somewhere right now!
The U.S. video tapes for this series only included the first seven episodes of this series, so many of us will be seeing 14 "new" episodes! If you have those video tapes or have seen this show on public television, what are you waiting for? The video is of high quality and there are no gotchas; it's a wonderful set I'll keep mine for the rest of my life. If you are an anglophile who enjoys the likes of "To the Manor Born" or the Ian Richardson "House of Cards" trilogy (soon to be released on DVD as well), you will more than likely enjoy this set too. For the rest of you who have never seen this show, just know that it is an incredibly witty (though never silly) look into a well-meaning minister's (Paul Eddington) attempts to reform the civil service and an incredibly clever director of the civil service's (Sir Nigel Hawthorne) attempts to prevent any reforms. Don't let the subject matter fool you, it is never dull and will have you laughing throughout.
While there is a lengthy segment on Sir Nigel Hawthorne including an interview conducted shortly before his fatal condition was diagnosed, I wish there had been commentary on at least one of the episodes from the writers or producers (or even Derek Fowlds, who sadly is the only major surviving member of the cast) just to get a insider feel for the show.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By mirasreviews HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 20, 2004
Format: DVD
"Yes, Minister" is simply the best political satire ever committed to film. The BBC series originally ran on British television from 1980-1982, with one hour-long special in 1984. Jim Hacker (Paul Eddington), a man who could be described as mediocre in all things, is the Minister of Administrative Affairs. Ever conscious of his popularity with the voters and concerned with his career, Hacker tries to assert his own agenda but finds himself constantly thwarted by the realities of government....in the form of his Permanent Undersecretary of State, Sir Humphrey Appleby. Sir Humphrey (Nigel Hawthorne) is a veteran civil servant and bureaucrat by distinction. His job is to serve the Minister, but his role is to guard the status quo and the welfare of the Civil Service. Jim Hacker promised the voters change; his right-hand man will do anything go prevent it. The results are hilarious as these two try to outmaneuver one another. The Minister's Private Secretary, Bernard (Derek Fowlds), is caught in the middle, from which he never fails to correct any mismatched metaphors that his colleagues toss at one another.

"Yes, Minister" mines the English language's large and curious vocabulary to great comedic effect. The characters' sparring and obfuscation are all verbal. I can't imagine how many takes it took to make some of Sir Humphrey's tongue-twisting dialogue intelligible. "Yes, Minister" produced more memorable one-liners than I could count.

Writers Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn have assured their place in comedic history. "Yes, Minister" was the favorite television program of Margaret Thatcher while she was Prime Minister of Great Britain. In her words, "Its closely observed portrayal of what goes on in the corridors of power has given me hours of poor joy." She's not the only one.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in