Yes, We Have No Neutrons and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Yes, We Have No Neutrons: An Eye-Opening Tour through the Twists and Turns of Bad Science Paperback – August 25, 1998

ISBN-13: 978-0471295860 ISBN-10: 0471295868 Edition: 1st

11 New from $3.32 28 Used from $0.01
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.32 $0.01

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (August 25, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471295868
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471295860
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,049,051 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Cold fusion" has become an oft-used synonym for science gone wrong, but as A.K. Dewdney colorfully explains in Yes, We Have No Neutrons, bad science has a long and (un)distinguished history. Predicating his discussion on Langmuir's "Laws of Bad Science," which describes common characteristics of dubious scientific claims, Dewdney recounts such classic scientific blunders as the "discovery" of N rays by René Blondlot, psychoanalysis as practiced by Sigmund Freud, and even the ill-fated Biosphere 2 experiment. (Yes, cold fusion is there, too.) Dewdney's book will sharpen the mental razor of anyone who hopes to separate legitimate claims from bunk.

From School Library Journal

YA?Eight entertaining vignettes that illustrate how science can go awry when researchers become convinced of the truth before all the results are in and the analysis completed. Examples come from 20th-century research in a variety of areas including biology, physics, astronomy, psychology, and sociology. Case studies include the 1989 announcement by two scientists that they had achieved cold fusion in a simple contraption and the highly touted, but flawed, Biosphere. The book is easy reading even for those with no technical background. The sections can be read at random, and there's enough continuity for readers to place each segment into the context of the larger theme.?Greg Matthes, R. E. Lee High School, Springfield, VA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Littrell HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 25, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The clever title refers to the cold fusion delusion of 1989. Dewdney also takes apart the Biosphere 2 experiment in Arizona in 1991 where the roaches prospered while the people lost a lot of weight and would never have made it without some artificial help from a CO2 "scrubber." Freud, SETI, The Bell Curve believers and neural nets also come under attack as unscientific.
Well, Freud shouldn't even be suspected of being "scientific." In France Freud is read as literature, as is only right. And to attack SETI! Sure it's a long shot, probably a VERY long shot, but what else do we have to do that could possibly reveal anything near as interesting should it succeed? Shame on you, Dewdney. Otherwise, I tend to agree with him, especially about Biosphere 2 which ought to be done again with people who have something close to a clue as to the sort of Herculean dedication and commitment necessary. And bravo for going after the not-too-bright proponents of the antiquated notion of IQ, who think they can define "intelligence," but haven't the foggiest understanding of the real question, "Intelligence for what?" even if they could define it.
In other words, this is a fun book if your ox is not being gored.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Scott White on January 17, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Dewdney begins with a lively high-school level explanation of the scientific method, and characterizes bumbling scientists as akin to Mickey Mouse as the sorcerer's apprentice in Disney's Fantasia (while good scientists are contrasted as true sorcerers). This unfortunate metaphor persists throughout the book. He lambasts bad physics (cold fusion), bad social science (IQ testing, Freudian psychology, and "The Bell Curve"), and bad environmental science (Biosphere 2 -- or was this only bad public relations completely lacking in scientific credentials?). There also is a chapter on bad information theory (neural networks), but I lost interest before finishing it. The well-deserved criticisms of IQ and Freud were especially worthwhile, since both get far too little of it. I was unhappy with his inclusion of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Dewdney seems to miss the point that some science, like the work of the great 19th century naturalists, is purely descriptive and is not hypothesis-driven. His objections to SETI are based in his own funding priorities rather than scientific criticism. A worthwhile recreational read, also appropriate for young readers (e.g., as an introduction to scientific method), but awfully slim for the price.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 16, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This book might have been an interesting debunking of bad science, but Mr. Dewdney conducts his examination in the true spirit of the Inquisition: he is less interested in finding the truth than he is in watching the accused burn. The result is singularly unsatisfying, as the reader wades through pages of Mr. Dewdnet not debunking bad science, but simply deriding it and righteously thumbing his nose at it. The experience is rather like watching someone shoot fish in a barrel--except that he's armed only with a squirt gun. Readers looking for an intellectually careful exploration of the issues here will be disappointed
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
I'm happy to see that other reviewers noted Dewdney's excesses regarding the validity of the SETI efforts. Whether or not you think you know what SETI will find, his analysis of SETI's objectives and methodology seems completely inconsistent with his stated theme and has all the appearances of a personal prejeudice. In contrast, he goes out of his way to be fair in his coverage of the cold fusion debacle. I generally enjoy Dewdney's work-- just watch out for his indiosyncrasies here.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 31, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Dewdney's book is very popular in its tone, and deserves four stars in terms of entertainment value. Dewdney comes across as overzealous in denouncing any project that does not rigorously follow the scientific method, however, and seems to view technology (and its relationship to science) with disdain. In discussing the SETI program and Biosphere 2, for example, the author seems to write off certain questions (Are there other civilizations trying to communicate with us? Can man build a self-sustaining, self enclosed ecosystem that will support human life indefinitely?) as meaningless because they are not "scientific." Similarly, Dewdney's presentation of the IQ debate is very one-sided. Nowhere in the book is it acknowledged that some non-falsifiable hypothesis or purely technological questions are still worth thought and investigation. Yes, We Have No Neutrons is an enjoyable read, but readers should be aware of the author's bias and resist the temptation to condemn the researchers and projects in question without thought.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?