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Yes, You Can Get A Financial Life!: Your Lifetime Guide to Financial Planning Paperback – January 1, 2008


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Yes, You Can Get A Financial Life!: Your Lifetime Guide to Financial Planning + Yes, You Can Still Retire Comfortably!: The Baby-Boom Retirement Crisis and How to Beat It + The Little Book of Bulletproof Investing: Do's and Don'ts to Protect Your Financial Life
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: New Beginnings Press (January 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401911250
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401911256
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.9 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,228,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

       Ben Stein can be seen talking about finance on Fox TV news every week. He has written about finance for Barron’s and The Wall Street Journal for decades and contributes regularly to the AARP’s Modern Maturity (now AARP: The Magazine). He was one of the chief busters of the junk bond frauds of the 1980s, has been a long-time critic of corporate executives’ self-dealing, and has written several self-help books about personal finance.

        Phil DeMuth is an investment psychologist with a longstanding interest in the stock market. He has written for The Wall Street Journal and Barron’s, as well as Human Behavior and Psychology Today. His opinions have been quoted on theStreet.com and Fortune Magazine. He is president of Conservative Wealth Management in Los Angeles.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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A terrific book.
Craig Matteson
I'd certainly recommend this book to anyone who feels they need a little guidance on financial planning.
Jerry Harding
This book would be a great gift to a high school or college graduate.
Steve Burns

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Judging by the quality and helpfulness of the books they write together, Ben Stein and Phil DeMuth are a great team. If you are interested in money, and everyone is, you will certainly benefit from their books. They have shown how, given enough time and discipline one can "time" the market (not by day trading), how to become a successful income investor, how you can get from wherever you are to a comfortable retirement, and now they provide us with a book for young people beginning their work lives. The financial life they describe begins with understanding what the workplace is about and how salaries should be viewed.

They begin by helping the reader view their income and expenditures (consumption) as a lifetime cycle. When we are young, we consume more than we make, but we are consuming our parents' resources. At the mature end of our lives, we also want to consume more than we make because we want to retire. To make that happen, something has to happen during our working years other than buying everything we think we want or suppose we need. The authors point out that we cannot wish life would return to the way our parents knew it or as we dream it should becomes. ". . . we have to plan for life as it is today, not as it was yesterday."

Once we can see the future as an economic life cycle, the authors give us some insights on how to maximize lifetime wealth. It is about getting an education in a marketable field that will keep you in demand rather than indulging yourself in an expensive college education (both in dollars and in years) that will not lead to gainful employment. Graduate school might even make some sense, if you use your education wisely.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Steve Burns TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 11, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book is a little different than other books on personal finances. Instead of a rules and budget sheets it teaches principles on what to do and not to do to be successful financially. It guides you through each stage of your life from college age until deep into retirement. I would recommend reading this book and adding it to your personal finance library at any age. Below are the top ten principles in this book:

1. First increase your human capital by getting a solid education and developing excellent work habits, making connections, and cultivating a pleasant personality.

2. Then start saving for retirement as early as possible. Fund your 401K aggressively.

3. Next start saving for a house down payment.

4. Get and stay married to a sensible person.

5. Don't try to show off by what you own, expensive cars, vacations, etc.

6. Work full-time, year-round, and acquire seniority; don't hopscotch from one unrelated job to another unless you're jumping a step up.

7. Don't make any financial moves that will contribute to a divorce.

8. Make your children pay for their own college education. It is their asset they should pay for it.(Unless you are wealthy).

9. Don't expect that you have a right to a certain lifestyle. You can only afford to live as well as your finances allow.

10. Don't swing for the fences with your investments. Use low expense index funds. Stay invested through thick and thin.

This book would be a great gift to a high school or college graduate. Or to some one who just needs to get back on the correct financial track.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By K. Corn TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 4, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I buy a lot of financial books and use the info to fit MY life and lifestyle. Ben Stein is a favorite of mine because of his no nonsense style and the fact that he doesn't mollycoddle his readers. Yes, he says, life can be hard, expect to suffer some financial blows, don't be devastated by financial (or other) setbacks and...get on with it. Learn from your mistakes and keep upping your learning curve. This book certainly will help you gain some solid info.

This is the type of book that SHOULD be read by younger readers as well as those who are old enough to realize that they've made some financial mistakes or aren't saving as much as they thought and need to make changes. Unfortunately, the younger readers aren't getting the basics in school (Financial Literacy ought to be a required course - don't get me started on that) and are subject to the usual mistakes of youth (consumerism and buying expendable items) but this book can certainly help all readers, if they have the sense to buy it - and at whatever stage of life they're at - 20s, 30s, midlife, etc.

One final tip - If you use a credit card to buy this book or any books , pay off the debt as soon as possible, before you forget about it. Don't end up paying high interest rates in order to try to gain financial "freedom". I've noticed a lot of people seem to get in financial trouble and then spend a lot of money trying to "learn" how to get out of it. Avoiding credit cards with high interest rates as well as avoiding spending yourself into a huge hole of debt certainly helps. Just a thought.

But DO buy this book. It'll pay for itself.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rick Berglund on June 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book lays out a simple approach to starting and keeping up with financial planning for retirement. The best part about this book is that anyone, and I mean anyone can follow these steps easily. The book shows you where you should be, and how to get there for every 5 years of your life, starting at 25. This isn't a make money fast type book, the opposite if anything. There is simple investment advice than anyone can follow, it even lists index mutual funds from Fidelity and Vanguard to help you out. It also shows simple allocations for your retirement for every decade of your life, including post-retirement.
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