Yesterday And Today

January 1, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
8:03
30
2
6:53
30
3
11:38
30
4
10:09
30
5
8:37
30
6
15:41
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 19, 2009
  • Release Date: January 1, 2008
  • Label: Anti/Epitaph
  • Copyright: 2009 Kompakt, Under Exclusive License To Anti, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:01:01
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0029N663Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #104,410 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Angry Mofo on May 19, 2009
Format: Audio CD
At first, I expected this to be a rehash of From Here We Go Sublime, which I thought was over-rated. Indeed, the first track is made strictly according to the Sublime template. The beat in "I Have The Moon..." is straightforward and conventional, and backed by a humming one-note drone. The bright keyboard fragments that open the song are very similar to the ones in "Everday." There is nothing in the composition to distinguish the song from anything on The Field's first album -- although, granted, if it had appeared on that album, it would have been one of the better songs, like "Everday" or "Silent."

But that first track makes a deceptive impression. Miraculously, Axel Willner manages to put a new spin on the old sound. The songs on Yesterday And Today have less hazy echo and more energy than the songs on Sublime. The highlight of this album is "Leave It," which uses Willner's usual drone-heavy compositional style, but hits on a brilliant idea in the form of a cold, reverberating chime that floats dispassionately above the chugging house beat. Willner then adds swaths of anthemic keyboards, which do what they always do in techno music and turn the track into a sweeping rush, a bona fide dancefloor anthem. It is twelve minutes long, but never drags. The last techno album where I could say that was Vocalcity. DJs everywhere, take note.

The second track "Everybody's Got To Learn Sometime" is a cover, which may explain why it departs from Willner's template more than anything else here. Most notably, it doesn't have the 4/4 house beat that Willner usually relies on.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nate on September 11, 2009
Format: Audio CD
People need to understand that this album is amazing. I bought "From Here We Go Sublime" and I loved it, but once I started listening to "Yesterday & Today" my opinion of electronic music changed forever. The songs on this album have more plays than any song in my iTunes library by an order of magnitude. I listen to it to write, to sleep, to drive, to live. It is one of the best albums I have ever listened to. The deceptively-disappointing 1-2 opening of "I Have The Moon, You Have the Internet" and "Everybody's Got To Learn Sometime" gives way to a foursome of songs too amazing to describe, and they wouldn't be as amazing without the slow-build intro of the first two songs. "The More That I Know" is my favorite song of the year and one of the best tracks I've ever heard. Ever. If you purchase this album, you will not believe how many times you will want to listen to it. Music rarely gets this good.
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Format: Audio CD
YESTERDAY AND TODAY is a bit of a come-down for The Field after the stunning FROM HERE WE GO SUBLIME. So while "I Have the Moon, You Have the Internet" and "Leave It" follow the same pattern (loops and variations), Axel Willner tries his hand at some other textures as well, like the steel pans that end the former. But he's not always successful: the vocals on his cover of The Korgi's "Everybody's Got to Learn Sometime" aren't bad, per se, but they are a little out of place. (Besides, NRG still has a lock on the song with their rave anthem "I Need Your Lovin'.") John Stanier from Battles comes in to co-produce the title track, and here you hear the fault lines start to crack. The track begins like a version of "The Deal" but without the oomph, and around the 2/3rds point it simply peters out, while still continuing. "The More I Do" starts off great as well, but ends, curiously, on the steel pan again. The final track, "Sequenced," just seems to go on and on, aimlessly. It's an unfortunately end to an uneven album, one with its high points as well as its low points, definitely.
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By Eddie T on May 10, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Yesterday and Today is the second full-length album by The Field, aka Alex Willner of Sweden. This album continues the minimal techno style of his debut, From Here We Go Sublime. Willner's songs border on ambient, but below the soothing tones and light drum beats are very complex songs which become more apparent on every listen. On the opening track, "I Have the Moon, You Have the Internet", Willner builds to a crescendo which doesn't strike you until the very end, and never really comes to fruition. The songs of this album evolve, and unless the listener is playing close attention it's hard to put a finger on just how that is happening. This album is enjoyable both under the microscope as well as as from a distance, where one can allow the somewhat far away beats and tones carry you from one place to another. The simplicity and lightness of the songs do not take away from the intensity, which never lets the music slip too far away as to be forgotten.
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