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Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow - The Greatest Hits Of Kenny Loggins

March 25, 1997 | Format: MP3

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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:56
30
2
4:01
30
3
3:40
30
4
5:20
30
5
3:35
30
6
3:39
30
7
3:46
30
8
4:14
30
9
3:37
30
10
4:22
30
11
6:50
30
12
5:37
30
13
4:26
30
14
4:44
30
15
5:20

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Product Details

  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:07:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004DD5PAA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (140 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,406 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

His music and lyrics continue to be great.
M. D. Stanley
Greatest Hits from the"greatest" is surely one of the best and greatest albums ever!
"icesanpedro"
If you like great music this is the cd to get I would highly recommend buying it.
Rosalynn Clark

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Hamlow HALL OF FAME on January 30, 2004
Format: Audio CD
There was life yet for Kenny Loggins following the amicable split of Loggins and Messina. His solo career lasted well into the 90's. The first two songs here characterize a lighter feel, with some classic disco-type string synths. Keep The Fire's "This Is It" was one of two songs co-written with Michael McDonald, the other one, "What A Fool Believes", being a hit for the Doobies. A song describing a momentous decision, this was inspired by Loggins' father undergoing an ordeal and choosing life over death.
"Whenever I Call You 'Friend'", from his Nightwatch album, features Stevie Nicks on harmony vocals and was a US Top Ten hit. It starts slow, but from the refrain, the tempo bursts into a classic disco beat. There's also a nice sax solo in the middle. This song was co-written with Melissa Manchester.
The jaunty mid-tempo piano number "Heart To Heart" has a 70's R&B feel to it. This features Michael McDonald on the Rhodes piano, and on backing vocals, Richard Page and Steve George, who would later fly on their broken wings to form Mr. Mister.
Loggins made his heyday in the 1980's by being "Mr. Soundtrack," most of them which hit the Top Ten. That started with "I'm Alright" from Caddyshack, whose fun stomping tone set the pace for the movie and finally yielded a tune obviously bogus gophers could shake to. Then there's the thumping drums and surf guitar of "Footloose" which topped the US charts, and the sizzling and roaring rock guitar and a sound and lyrics that mirrored the aura of zipping in the sky at who-knows-how-many-miles-an-hour of Top Gun's "Danger Zone." Those latter two were two songs I associated with Kenny Loggins.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Anthony G Pizza VINE VOICE on January 4, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Kenny Loggins hardly seemed a logical choice to retain, let alone grow, his success as the 70s ended. Like Phil Collins, another superstar of the new decade, Loggins was best known for work with a group (Loggins and Messina) with a clearly identifiable, well-regarded image and sound hard to break from.
What impresses you most, then, about "Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow" is Loggins' versatility. He wrote elegant jazz-flavored pop like "Whenever I Call You Friend" (with Melissa Manchester) and the gorgeous holiday ballad "Celebrate Me Home" (his first solo hits, produced by smooth jazzman Bob James). He wrote sweeping pop-gospel ballads like "This Is It," (with Michael McDonald), "Heart To Heart," and the ecological anthem, "Conviction Of The Heart." He could write intimate children's songs like the update of "House On Pooh Corner," or New Age-flavored love songs like "The Rest Of Your Life."
But then, again like Collins, Loggins was every bit the mercernary with his successful 80s movie songs, many produced with disco's Georgio Moroder. "I'm Alright," 1984's #1 "Footloose," 1986's "Danger Zone" and "Meet Me Half Way" epitomise an 80s rock style with slamming, near-rockabilly drums (from Tris Imboden, who later joined another 70s-into-80s hitmaker, Chicago), synthesized bass and steely guitars far from Loggins & Messina's laid-back sound. (Loggins, eloquent in his liner notes for each song, offers none for these.) Loggins' duet with Journey's Steve Perry, "Don't Fight It," ironically sounds loosest and most fun among the rockers here yet charted lowest.
A Loggins renaissance seems well-timed.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 6, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Five star reviews come fast and furious in this venue for earnest music lovers who want to tout their favorite artists, but here's a release that has spent over 20 years earning its high marks. Most artists would be happy to have any three of the blockbusters that appear on this collection to define their music career. But Kenny Loggins just keeps pouring them on one after another. Appropriately, he floods the front end of this venture with his best selling and most recognizable hits, jumping from classic vocal pairings with the likes of Michael McDonald (This Is It) and Stevie Nicks (Whenever I Call You "Friend") to full-throttle movie soundtrack cuts that defined and carried the films for which they were recorded (Danger Zone for Top Gun and Footloose for the film of the same name). We are gradually weaned from the adrenaline rush of these familiar heart pumpers with tunes that are more personal and reflective in nature. Though I don't often go for remakes of old standards, the updated version of House At Pooh Corner with additional lyrics turns into quite a remarkable revelation. And I've been looking for years to find that goofy Caddyshack theme of I'm Alright on SOMETHING. Thanks for everything, Kenny, including the promise of tomorrow.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ed Uyeshima HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 25, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Ah...this one takes me back. Singer/songwriter Kenny Loggins epitomized the mellow Southern California pop/rock of the 1970's and 80's. Baby boomers like me look at this period of music with nostalgia and can forgive the sometimes unctuous vocal delivery he displayed. Less rhythmically oriented than his peer Michael McDonald, Loggins veered toward punctuated hooks and big ballads. This greatest hits collection represents his predilections pretty accurately, and the sound is quite clean. There are several movie soundtrack songs included here - the beer-chugging "I'm Alright" from "Caddyshack", the synth-saturated "Danger Zone" from "Top Gun"; the touchy-mopey "Meet Me Half Way" from the Sly Stallone arm-wrestling flick, "Over the Top"; and of course, the inescapably snappy "Footloose". There are also a couple of duets - the rocker-wannabe "Don't Fight It" with Journey's Steve Perry and the Mac-and-cheese classic, "Whenever I Call You Friend" with Stevie Nicks.

However, the best tracks are the two he wrote with McDonald, both reflecting the Doobie-inflected beats that were damnably catchy - his do-or-die anthem, "This Is It", and my personal favorite, "Heart to Heart", with its swooning cadences and a beautiful string accompaniment that turns the song into a true guilty pleasure. There are also more recent tracks - the treacle-laden "For the First Time" and the pop-jazzy "The Rest of Your Life" - which show how he has moved seamlessly to the adult contemporary genre. Understand that a lot of these songs were AM-radio staples when they were climbing the charts back then, so listening to them a quarter-century later is like a time-capsule of the Reagan years. This is good listening for fans, though the unconverted will likely remain unmoved.
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