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Yesterday We Were in America: Alcock and Brown - First to Fly the Atlantic Non-Stop Paperback – November 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK (November 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 085733249X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857332493
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,737,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Brendan Lynch is a former Grand Prix correspondent for UK and Irish media including The Observer, Daily Mail and Irish Press. As a supporter of Bertrand Russell, he was imprisoned for anti-nuclear protests in the 1960s. He has written five books, including the award-winning motor racing history Green Dust. He lives in Dublin.


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Speed Readers on December 10, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Yesterday We Were in America: Alcock and Brown, First to fly the Atlantic non-stop
by Brendan Lynch

"Yesterday We Were in America!" Imagine saying that at a cocktail party, or to your friends and neighbors--in 1919. This is in fact the phrase pilot Alcock kept repeating to the crew of the Marconi radio station near which he had landed, and who simply would not believe him until he produced as evidence a sealed mailbag from Newfoundland, his point of departure 1,880 miles back across the Atlantic. This is about as exotic a pronouncement as today saying "Yesterday We Were on Mars!" It was totally unprecedented. It had only been three weeks earlier that an Atlantic crossing by a US Navy flying boat, that in a pinch could have set down on the water and rendevoused with a rescue boat, had concluded--and that had taken 19 days of flying in short stages (for a total of 57:16 housrs in the air). And now Cpt John Alcock and Lt Arthur Whitten Brown had done a 1900-mile nonstop crossing from Newfoundland to Ireland, nonstop in 16 hours and in a rickety Vickers Vimy biplane at that.

We live in a world that has in the lifespan of one generation gone from horse-drawn buggy to putting a man on the moon and has seen everyday supersonic civilian air travel come and go. Been there, done that. But a newspaper reader in 1919 would have been overcome with excitement at the novelty of this flight--the longest distance traveled nonstop by man--in a world still new to mechanization in general and aviation in particular. (Recall that the war that had ended a year earlier--the Great War, World War One--had started with horses and ended with tanks!)

And excitement was generated again in 2005.
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