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Yoga School Dropout Paperback – January 6, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (January 6, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091899222
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091899226
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,463,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"'A hilarious, hopeless and desperate quest' Chris Stewart, author of Driving Over Lemons"

About the Author

Lucy Edge has worked in advertising for fifteen years, on the board of leading agencies and has won awards for her creative campaigns with The Famous Grouse, Lloyds, Marks & Spencer and the Green Giant. She lives in London but also spends a lot of time in strange positions in India.

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Customer Reviews

After a while, though it gets tedious, childish, and no longer funny.
aruna
This is one of my favourite books and I'm so grateful to Lucy for writing it, my favourite read in years!
Ms. Clare A. Rackham
I am currently reading this book, Yoga School Dropout, w/ eat pray love and the Bhavighad Gita (SP).
E. E. Lohmann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ms. Clare A. Rackham on April 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
I became interested in yoga last year and while searching for books on the subject online this popped up. On a whim I decided to buy it and once it turned up I could not put it down. I never read a book twice, but I read this twice in a couple of months, I just wanted to revisit it. Obviously an interest in yoga means you're more likely to enjoy it, but it also gave me my first insight into India. I'd never had any real desire to go there before but since reading this I can't wait to go. I feel this book opened my eyes to another culture and as someone with an interest in yoga who knew nothing about it, this taught me so much and gave me a foundation from which to explore the subject and learn more. This is one of my favourite books and I'm so grateful to Lucy for writing it, my favourite read in years!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By aruna on November 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is about the adventures of Lucy Edge, a spiritual tourist, in India. That means I am automatically biased against it, since I have little patience with spiritual tourists-- those shallow people who go ashram hopping, expecting "Enlightenment" to come like a bolt from the sky any minute, chatting about chakras and Kundalini the way they'd chat about the latest style of handbags, and really all they want is to get laid or get drunk. Yes, I'm a bit of a snob, and very protective of India's spirituality, which ever since the Beatles "discovered" it has been manipulated by ever more Westerners to fit into their own shallow world-view and expectations. But I was curious, willing to enter the mind of one of them, to give the author a chance, to see what is being read these days, and so I read this book.

The first chapters confirmed my prejudices. The book is written in a chick-litty, Bridget Jones style, kind of a "romp through ashrams", breezily taking note of all the most amusing incidents and characters she meets along the way. That's not hard to do; you'll see a lot of very amusing things in India, and if your funny bone is in the right place you'll laugh at life instead of getting annoyed. Lucy laughs at herself a lot too, about her eyeing up men, including swamis, for their bed-or-husband-potential, her dreams of becoming a Yoga Goddess, and so on. Lucy has a naturally light writing style which flows, and it makes for good page-turning reading. After a while, though it gets tedious, childish, and no longer funny. Her immaturity comes out particularly when she is asked to write a nativity play for a Christmas celebration, and decides to write a spoof.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Valerie D. Bets on July 2, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Boring. Poorly written. I had the hardest time even picking this book back up again. I'm always on the look out for a 'personal' take on the spiritual and physical journey that is yoga, as I've been a practitioner for years. So many yoga books are drowning in new-age spiritual mumbo jumbo that it's hard to get through them. This one doesn't have much of that, but it does have a lot of boring, cliched jibber jabber. If you practice yoga at all, then you are not surprised in the least by the lithe, tan 'goddesses' that disguise their vanity in the name of yoga. Or the 'gurus' that spend more time having affairs than meditating. These characters are not interesting - they're cliches that aren't funny anymore. "Hilarious?" Hardly. "Self-deprecating?" I'd say more self-congratulatory - as in 'look how self-deprecating I am! Isn't this funny?!' This does not even come close to being in the same league as Eat Pray Love. I suppose there's a reason it is self-published.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Derek on June 5, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I tried. Really, I tried to get through this book. Maybe the next chapter would engage me but it never really happened. Yoga is something I hold very dear to my heart and this book really has nothing to do with it. This made me consider not going to an Ashram in India. If it's full of these people, I will pass.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nicola Taylor on April 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
I came across this fabulous little book by the wonderful Lucy Edge while looking for something to fill the void left after I finished Eat, Pray, Love. I wanted to read more about yoga and spirituality and I was daydreaming about quitting my corporate job so this book sounded perfect, and I absolutely LOVED it! If you've ever sat at your desk, wondering what the hell you're doing with your life, surfing the web for yoga vacations, then this book is for you. Buy it, read it and follow in her footsteps. She's down to earth and hilarious but an absolute inspiration to us all.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kristi Lees on July 10, 2006
Format: Paperback
I have just finished reading this delightful book, `Yoga School Drop Out' by Lucy Edge. I happened upon it `accidentally' (we all know there is no such thing as an accident) at the library when I was looking for something entirely different. I did not manage to find what I was looking for; I did however find exactly what I needed!

Lucy sets out on a Spiritual Quest to India determined to return home a Yoga Goddess. Things do not quite flow as Lucy anticipated and it looked as if she was destined never to return home as the Yoga Goddess she had envisioned. She did, however, gain more inner wisdom and insight than she could have imagined when she first set out.

Along the way it was the "ordinary" people she met, not the yoga she did, or the gurus she listened to, that held the most lessons. Here are a few pearls that were shared along the way:

On Asana: "Today asana has been made into a `photograph,' ... there is no difference between this and gymnastics ... But asana is not a performance, asana is what happens in the posture and afterwards"

On Change: "Change occurs only when we become what we truly are, not when we are trying to be something we are not. Change can't happen when we are trying to escape our true nature"

On Travel: "Unfortunately, when you travel, you take yourself with you"

On Yoga: "... the reason I found them so inspiring was because their yoga practice stretched way beyond their mat. They saw yoga as a state of mind, an attitude to life, and the world as their school. Yoga was, for all of them, `a harmonious way of living', not a one-off physical goal - they knew all they had to do was look within"

On Practice: "It was an unremarkable thing - Pranayama, meditation and perhaps a few simple sun salutations.
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