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Yol [VHS]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Tarik Akan, Serif Sezer, Halil Ergün, Meral Orhonsay, Necmettin Çobanoglu
  • Directors: Serif Gören, Yilmaz Güney
  • Writers: Yilmaz Güney
  • Producers: Yilmaz Güney, Edi Hubschmid, K.L. Puldi
  • Format: Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Language: Kurdish, Turkish
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home E
  • VHS Release Date: July 31, 1991
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6302824435
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #477,156 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 13 customer reviews
I don't know realistic its portrayal of Turkey was.
T. Simonson
This is honestly one of the best films I have seen, other works pale in comparison.
Elvan
Even besides the controversy, this film is beautiful creation of art.
"rishigm"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "rishigm" on December 7, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
This is a beautiful film. The film was directed by Yilmaz Guney when he was in jail. The assistant director Serif Goren shot the film in absence of Guney. There are lots of debates about who deserves the credit. As like any good films, the process of the making a film, is not just with the cinematography, or editing or script writing, it's more with the vision and how each pieces of work are integrated together to represent the final vision of the film. Although there are not much of materials to indicate who delivers this final form, I tend to believe that it's Guney's work of art. Even besides the controversy, this film is beautiful creation of art. The films runs parallel with the life of five prisoner, when they are released for one week, a sort of vacation. When these characters came out of the prison, through series of check post, they finally arrives their familiar surroundings which again symbolize them as a victim of cultural repression. It is a personal film, of certain characters who are the victim of repression, political and cultural both. Probably for any aspiring society to be liberated from repression, it is necessary identify the roots of repression which has it roots in cultural blindness and also the political aspiration of the elite class. And they often converge very well. These are just two sides of a coin, which lay down victims on both the side as it rolls on. This beautifully displays the emotion, naïve emotions of human aspiration, parallels across different cultures, and their conflicts deeply rooted in the culture.Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "omniscientfool" on June 18, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This is a rare three-star masterpiece; one must consider that the average (in this case even the above average) viewer will not see the art of this epic--only an overlong, grainy old foreign film which is slow and hard to follow. (Sad but true) The late snow-travel scenes are absolutely surreal: in a blizzard, passing an ornate, leafless tree, a father carries his swooning wife while she is beaten by their five year-old son to keep her awake and alive. My mother's comment, regardless of cultural reality, was that the women in this film were nothing but instruments for men's suffering...that and no one's ever happy. One leaves with thorough and all-too-tempting-to-generalize view of Turkey as a war-torn, miserable, impoverished, and just plain backward country. It illustrates what happens when "family" is, perhaps, a little TOO important (honor, shame, etc.). Considering the circumstances, this is an amazing film, but it's not one someone would(/could?) watch again and again. Be prepared to gasp and feel guilty for being able to "kick back" with a movie.
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By HHK on July 4, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
First,let me clarify this.. The director of this movie is not Yilmaz Guney. It is Serif Goren, who was Guney's assistant in his previous movies.. Guney wrote the script, but it was filmed by Goren in 1981 in Southeastern Turkey (where I was born) under very difficult conditions after the military coup . It was then rewarded Palme D'Or in Cannes in 1982, along with Costa Gavras's Missing, both being political films.It was illegal in Turkey until recently. This is probably what gave it its cult status in Turkey. So far so good.

I was able to see the movie at a college show in Istanbul in 1996. I had heard so much about the movie ("the best Turkish movie ever", "a masterpiece" etc.) and had great expectations. Unfortunately, my expectations were not met and I left the theater bored.

The movie starts with a good idea (five prisoners are given a week's home leave). The prisoners are then faced with the harsh reality of the traditions. (One is forced to kill his unfaithful wife by the woman's family, one is forced to marry his sister-in-law since his brother was killed by the soldiers, etc.) Some directors might have created a masterpiece from this, but Goren fails. The characters are shallow and one-dimesional. Goren tries but fails to explore the alienation of the prisoners from the traditions of the society. After a certain point, the movie turns into an unpleasant touristic journey in southeastern Turkey.

"Yol" is one of those movies much debated for its politics rather than its artistic value. It shares the same destiny with Kusturica's Underground(1995).
Read more ›
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Zulfikar Pekin on March 21, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
I believe the film to be as the masterpiece of Yilmaz Guney's career and for any person to see. It reflects the problems faced by convicts and ordinary people in the region of South-Eastern Turkey like most of Yilmaz Guneys films do. The film was awarded the Palme D'Or at the Cannes film festival in 1982. Yilmaz Guney wrote the script and smuggled it out when he himself was in prison for his Political thoughts and views.So he had a insight into the lifes of these people. The film is of excellent Quality and truely reflects the hardship faced by similar people of the time and place. Serif Goren directed the film and Yilmaz Guney later fleed prison to seek Asylum in France where he later died.His work is still recognised today and he is seen as the greatest Turkish/Kurdish director and scripwriter.
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