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Yotsuba&!, Vol. 1 Paperback – September 15, 2009


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Series: Yotsuba&! (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Yen Press (September 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316073873
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316073875
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.8 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #48,410 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Yotsuba is the charming new girl in town in this all-ages shojo manga by the author of the popular Azumanga Daioh series. In seven stories, the green-haired four-year-old discovers air conditioners, doorbells, cicadas, swings and more, and does it all with the energy of a small hurricane. Her excitement is contagious and infects her handsome young adoptive father as well as the gaggle of pretty girls next door, all of whom get tangled up in her adventures as they try to keep up with her. But is there something strange about Yotsuba's lack of familiarity with the earthly world? The mystery of her origins is partially revealed in the final story: her father, Mr. Koiwai, found her and took her in, but Azuma seems to hint that there's more to be explained about Yotsuba. Koiwai sums up the reaction everyone seems to have to this little bundle of energy: "She can find happiness in anything," he says. "Nothing in this world can get her down." The plots here are little more than setups to explore everyday objects or concepts through the eyes of the irrepressible Yotsuba, but the genuinely sweet formula works, thanks to Azuma's solid storytelling and deft humor. (June 6)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 5 Up–This sometimes silly graphic novel is like a Japanese version of Dennis the Menace. Yotsuba, an energetic, green-haired little girl, drives her neighbors crazy with her goofy adventures. Parents might have some concern about the single father who, at times, walks around in nothing except a T-shirt and boxers in front of teenage girls, but it's used as a comedic device with no innuendo implied. Throughout the book, there are clues as to the nature of where this wild girl comes from; at the end, readers are set up perfectly for what will happen in future series entries. The story is more like a series of episodic anecdotes with virtually no character development. While it is fun, the plot is thin, and some readers are likely to find it boring. The art focuses on the humor, and while it not very detailed or interesting, it is warm and goes well with the lighthearted plot.–Scott La Counte, Anaheim Public Library, CA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Just reading this makes me happy.
Derek Glidden
He read the first few pages and was hooked.
Graciela Sholander
It's heartwarming and very funny.
Kolwynia

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Graciela Sholander on November 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
My 9th-grade daughter is a manga fanatic. One day, she came home after school, thrust this book into my hands, and said, "Mom, here's your assignment. Read this. You'll love it!"

It took about a week before I made the time to read it. But once I started reading Yotsuba, I couldn't put it down! I pushed my work aside and read it all the way through. The book is funny, warm, and lighthearted, and I felt great when I was done reading. The main character, a green-haired little girl named Yotsuba, completely lives in her own world. She's like a miniature, young Lucy from the old, black & white "I Love Lucy" shows. Innocent and fun-loving, she climbs up tree trunks and telephone poles pretending she's a cicada, rings doorbells just to see who'll come out, and climbs into a department store display bed and falls asleep while her dad's shopping for curtains. She's cute, spunky, and completely unpredictable.

The other characters grow on you quickly, too. There's family friend Jumbo, who claims his ancestors were giraffes (he's VERY tall). And the three neighbor girls, one of whom goes out of her way to help Yotsuba stay out of trouble (but somehow ends up in predicaments herself along the way). The cast of characters is fairly small, which I like, and each person has a unique, well-defined personality. All are quirky, but all work together to keep an eye on Yotsuba. At the same time, her effervescence brings a ray of light into their lives.

After I read the book, I gave it to my 7th-grade son, telling him he had to read it. He read the first few pages and was hooked. He also finished the book in a day. Now the three of us -- my daughter, my son, and I -- quote lines from the book to each other, like our own secret code!

If you're looking for light manga with a heart, this is it. Enjoy!

-- Graciela Sholander, [...]
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Hamlow HALL OF FAME on June 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed all four volumes of Azuma Kiyohiko's manga comedy, Azumanga Daioh. Her new series, Yotsubato or (Yotsuba &), is just as funny and crazy. It focuses on Yotsuba, an elementary school age girl with four pigtails who seems to be in her own world. But she's cute, as seen when she's waving at people through the door of the moving van, as she and her father, Koiwai, are on their way to their new home.

On how she's drawn, she's almost like Chiyo-chan, the student prodigy from Azumanga Daioh who has two less pigtails than Yotsuba. However, I doubt that Chiyo would climb up a telephone pole and make funny "zree zree" sounds. When Fuka Ayase, her next door, freaks out and asks what she is doing, Yotsuba says, "I'm a cicada." Fuka kind of resembles Azumanga's Kagura, minus the competitiveness and the tomboy qualities.

She is clueless about air conditioners, and when she hears about the connection between them and global warming, gets the conclusion that her father's a bad guy because he's destroying the world. And the doorbell to her is that thing that makes people come out.

The funniest segment involves her and Ena, Fuka's younger sister, going cicada catching with Jumbo, the very tall guy who helped Yotsuba and her father move, and when Yotsuba lets the cicadas loose in Fuka's house, clueless to the catastrophe, she merely goes "WOW" with her smile, then points to one and says, "There he is. I caught that one."

There is a gag about Jumbo's height. Ena, Fuka, their eldest sibling, the blonde Asagi, and their mother, all react to him, saying, "You're huge!" His best comeback is when he says, "my ancestors were giraffes.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Michael Valdivielso on August 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
Is she insane or is she an alien? Whatever Yotsuba is, she is a ball of hyper-active energy that can't be stopped or reasoned with. She reminds me of my two nephews.

The story started with her, and her father, moving into town. Right off the bat she makes friends, is attacked by a swing, because the enemy of air conditioning and confuses the heck out of everybody.

Great new series from the creator of Azumanga Daioh. A must! I already have the second volume.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Agent Excel on September 21, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This manga is constantly funny. It follows the adventure of a little girl in her new neighborhood. As in Azuma Kiyohiko's other work Azumanga Daioh, this manga is consistently sweet. It shows only the best aspects of being alive. I can't wait for this manga to be turned into anime. You know it is coming.

For those of you who may not have exposure to Azumanga Daioh, the closest comics I can think of is Calvin and Hobbes. While the subject matters in both works have only passing similarities, both work are of exceptional quality. Both works show you the best parts of life and make you glad that you have spent some time with those interesting and lovable little kids.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Yen Nguyen on June 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
Tell me why this genre has not been taken by any other manga artist other than Kiyohiko Azuma? This is a severely underused genre in manga, being that in this era it's all fantasy, sci-fi, or weird dramas. Don't start telling me that those overdramatic shoujo mangas are "real."

But for now, Azuma has a strong monopoly on the realkomedy approach, but his work shows real quality and enjoyability. Like Azumanga Daioh, his previous serialized title, Yotsuba&! is for the most part non-linear. The story mainly follows a young girl with a sunny disposition who cannot be saddened by anything at all. What the reader gets is a very re-readable book with great comedy revolving around silly characters.

This manga can be read and enjoyed by anyone. No drama, no action, just light comedy that can make anyone's day better.
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