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You Are the Message Paperback – August 20, 1989


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Crown Business; Reissue edition (August 20, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385265425
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385265423
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #113,240 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A first-class book that takes you behind the podiums with the big names in politics and industry. Don't say a word until you get through this one." --The Wall Street Journal

Accomplished Media Master Reveals Deepest Secrets of Powerful Communication in a Brilliant Bestseller

"...on the money when it comes to the techniques of public speaking...interesting reading, just as Ailes himself is an interesting man." --Sam Donaldson, ABC TV coanchor of "Prime Time Live" and ABC News correspondent

"...practical, sensible and entertaining...a wonderful store of anecdotes...Ailes, unlike so many self-help book authors, has a record of success to back up his advice." --Miami Herald

"...one of the best books I've ever read." --Marvin Kitman, media critic, Newsday

"...here is truly the chance of a lifetime with one of the best speech coaches in America." --CNN

"...a tremendous help for somebody who wants to go out--or has to go out--and communicate." --ABC Talkradio

From the Publisher

"A first-class book that takes you behind the podiums with the big names in politics and industry. Don't say a word until you get through this one." --The Wall Street Journal

Accomplished Media Master Reveals Deepest Secrets of Powerful Communication in a Brilliant Bestseller

"...on the money when it comes to the techniques of public speaking...interesting reading, just as Ailes himself is an interesting man." --Sam Donaldson, ABC TV coanchor of "Prime Time Live" and ABC News correspondent

"...practical, sensible and entertaining...a wonderful store of anecdotes...Ailes, unlike so many self-help book authors, has a record of success to back up his advice." --Miami Herald

"...one of the best books I've ever read." --Marvin Kitman, media critic, Newsday

"...here is truly the chance of a lifetime with one of the best speech coaches in America." --CNN

"...a tremendous help for somebody who wants to go out--or has to go out--and communicate." --ABC Talkradio


More About the Author

Roger Eugene Ailes was born in Warren, Ohio on 15 May 1940, the son of Donna Marie and Robert Eugene Ailes, a factory foreman at a local factory. Later in life, Roger Ailes was inducted into the Warren High School Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame.

Roger Ailes graduated from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio with a BA in 1962. Soon afterwards, Ailes began his television career as a property assistant on "The Mike Douglas Show." Working in Cleveland and Philadelphia, Roger Ailes quickly rose to producer in 1965 and executive producer between 1967 and 1968. "The Mike Douglas Show" was also the show that allowed Roger Ailes to be nominated for an Emmy in 1968.

It was during Roger Ailes' work on "The Mike Douglas" show that he engaged in a lively discussion about Television and the role it plays in Politics with then Presidential Candidate Richard M. Nixon. Nixon, having recognized Roger Ailes talent and foresight, brought him on as media adviser to Nixon's presidential campaign from 1967 -1968.

In 1968 Roger Ailes founded Ailes Communication in New York, a media production and consulting firm which consulted for a number of different politicians and businesses. He produced two Broadway plays; "Mother Earth" in 1972 and "Hot-L Baltimore" which premiered in 1973 and ran for three years.

Roger Ailes' exposure and success in his political consulting during the Nixon campaign, allowed him to once again consult for a presidential campaign. This time, for the 1984 campaign of Ronald Reagan. It is widely believed that Ailes' coaching of Reagan was the deciding factor which allowed Reagan to win the second presidential debate with Walter Mondale.

Again in 1987 and 1988 while acting as producer for several television specials, Roger Ailes successfully coached and consulted George H.W. Bush to victory in both the republican primaries and afterwards the presidential election beating opponent Michael Dukakis. Roger Ailes announced his withdrawal from political consulting in 1992.

After his successful political consulting efforts, Roger Ailes helped produce a television special called "Television and the Presidency", which was later expanded to be a multi-part series. In 1988, Roger Ailes wrote a book called "You Are the Message: Secrets of the Master Communicators" in which he divulged some of the strategies and philosophies for successful performances in public.

In 1993, Roger Ailes was named president of CNBC. During Ailes' presidency at CNBC, he planned and executed the inception of another CNBC channel called: "America's Talking" which debuted in 1994. It was on this channel that Roger Ailes hosted a nightly talk show called "Straight Forward".

Once the decision by Microsoft and NBC to create an online and cable news outlet became clear, and it was decided that "America's Talking" would be abandoned, Roger Ailes left - the newly named - MSNBC. Shortly after his departure from NBC/MSNBC, he was hired by Rupert Murdoch to create the now famous "Fox News Channel" for Murdoch's News Corporation. Fox News quickly became the most watched cable news network in the United States, in part due to notable names such as Geraldo Rivera as well as the memorable tagline - which to this day is still used - "Fair and Balanced". Fox News is also credited with big name stars such as Bill O'Reilly, Sean Hannity and Greta Van Susteren.

To this day he remains chair and CEO of Fox News Channel and also chairs Fox Television Stations, Twentieth Television, MyNetwork TV and Fox Business Network.

Customer Reviews

A must read for anyone who wants to improve their communication skills.
MPR
Even if the book's message was not so important, it would be worthwhile reading the book for the many wonderful stories.
Donald Mitchell
The book is very readable with lots of anecdotes and great stories to illustrate his points.
Ken Nelson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

64 of 68 people found the following review helpful By GraberDC on May 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
Some key points:
The assessment of you that's formed in the first 7 seconds creates a lasting impression of you in anothers mind.
Communication starts with good conversation.
Television has set the style of communication for today - relaxed, informal, crisp,quick,entertaining.It has made us impatient- make your point quick and interesting. Be visual.
You are The Message:
We are the message no matter what the medium.
Take a personal inventory of your asets that help you communicate
A good communicator takes responsibilty for the flow of communication.
Audiences respond to visual over verbal signals.
Make read speeches look conversational.
Test your powers of observation and description.
Review your past performances and communications and figure out how you would improve it.
Be natural, don't force an emotion.
Model the best professional communicators.
Perception counts more than content.
Record yourself on video and audio in interactions.Evaluate your performance.
4 Essentials of a Great Communicator:
1. Be Prepared
- your audience must have confidence that you know what you're talking about, and feel you know more about your topic than they do.
- you should appear that you have been thorough in researching your topic and analyzing the audience.
- you should be purposefull- goal is to inform, entertain, inspire, or all three.
- hostile or skeptical audience- show understanding of all side sof an issue
- supportive audience- reaffirm shared values
- be relaxed, calm, maintain a sense of humor, take your work seriously, avoid criticizing and disagreeable behavior, empathize.
2. Make Others Comfortaable
3.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Chris Forbes on August 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
Helps you understand how to present yourself better in public, on camera, etc. I really liked his listening tips. I think listening is the lost art of evangelism. You have to learn to listen if you are going to become good at marketing.

Take a look at these tips to help you become a better listener from the book:

1. Relax and clear your mind if someone is speaking to you, so that you're receptive to what they're saying.

2 Never assume that you have heard correctly because the first few words have taken you in a certain direction. Most listening mistakes are made by people who only hear the first few words of a sentence, finish the sentence in their own minds, and miss the second half.

3. Learn to speed up your point of contact as a listener. The second you hear a sound coming from another person concentrate quickly on the first few words. That will get you started correctly.

4. Don't tune out a speaker just because you don't like his or her looks, voice, or general demeanor. Stay open to new information.

5. Don't overreact emotionally to the speaker's words or ideas--especially those that may run contrary to your usual thinking. Hear the other person out.

6. Before forming a conclusion, let the speaker complete his or her thought. Then evaluate by distinguishing in your mind specific evidence presented (good) verses generalities (bad).

7. Part of listening is writing things down that are important. You should always have a piece of paper, a pencil, a notebook, or a card in your pocket. Throughout the day many important things will be discussed. Take notes to listen, to remember later, and to document, if necessary.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
The world is full of speaking coaches, but probably no one has a better track record for success than Roger Ailes. You may remember that Mr. Ailes helped President Reagan prepare for the critical second debate against former Vice President Walter Mondale in 1984 (". . . I promise not to hold his youth and inexperience against him"), and was a senior media advisor to Vice President Bush in the successful 1988 election campaign. His advice is to keep it as simple as possible for the speaker by building on the speaker's own natural conversational patterns, while accentuating the positive in communicating, avoiding the negative, and adding lots of directed energy.
Mr. Ailes is a great story teller, and he builds his key points with punchy, personal examples. For example, to establish his key principle about making an impression in the first 7 second you are with someone, he tells about meeting Charles Manson in prison and facing him down with steely eye contact. Manson looked away first. Afterwards, Manson was a willing interview subject. A second story builds the point by describing how a subway stick-up gang extorted money from those showing fearful body language by intimidating them.
Even if the book's message was not so important, it would be worthwhile reading the book for the many wonderful stories.
Mr. Ailes' basic point is to break down the art of face-to-face and televised communication into the most important elements. He encourages you to emphasize the unspoken dialogue . . . by how you use your body and respond to what others say. Listeners pay much more attention to the body language and to the emotion they feel from you than to the intellectual content of the message. This accentuated on television.
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