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You Can Call Me Al: The Colorful Journey of College Basketball's Original Flower Child, Al McGuire Paperback – March 22, 1999

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 308 pages
  • Publisher: Prairie Oak Pr; 1st edition (March 22, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1879483521
  • ISBN-13: 978-1879483521
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,909,538 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
Mr. Moran does an excellent job of recapping the Al McGuire era at Marquette University. He also tracks the career of Coach Al especially well. The book was a labor of love, but the author should have more closely looked at the "whole" Al McGuire. That's why the book is, at best, average.
What's missing is a sense of color brought on by perspective; the deep-down interpretations that the passage of time permits. As a long-time follower of Marquette basketball -- and a Marquette J-school grad to boot -- I believe too much of the book was newsy. Mr. Moran recanted stories that were well-known and well-publicized. Case in point: the oft-repeated Delsman fight.
What would have been interesting was to probe deeply the fundamental emotions that brought together some of the best college basketball talent and Al McGuire. What emotions were running through Jim Chones' psyche as he rejected UCLA and others for McGuire and MU? Or, why in succession, did Larry McNeill, Maurice Lucas and Bo Ellis all choose Marquette. What did their heart say? What was so special about this man that his players would attend college at Concrete University (despite McGuire's pleadings that Marquette had "green grass")with virtually no other African-American students.
The ballplayers had a profound impact on Marquette's outlook toward relationships among African-American and caucasian students. Mr. Moran documents this seldom discussed element of life at MU well. He effectively illustrates the Jesuit-Catholic response to one of the most basic precepts of the Christian church.
On the basketball side, Al lost as much talent to the NBA as he recruited in the early 1970s.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
i was there. i'm the guy in the broom closet,and just to add to the penurious legend i went to his medalist office to offer to pay for the ticket and he grabbed the money so fast i got blisters. i know everyone mentioned in the milwaukee half of the book and the author hits it pretty much on the head. very few glitches. a wonderful stroll down memory lane. must reading for all "warrior" fans and al watchers. thanks moran and thanks al. lefty
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Spell VINE VOICE on April 11, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love basketball and always thought Al was a great guy. While I looked forward to this book and am glad I read it, I cannot recommend it. Al is an interesting funny guy but that doesn't come out in the book. The book reads clinically without the emotion of Al McGuire felt through the writer. I did enjoy hearing of his early life but it was too long. Same for Belmont Abbey. Along the way you do learn interesting facts like he had a losing record when hired at Marquette. But, generally, as much as I liked the subject, the book did not live up.
PERSONAL MCGUIRE STORY.
I was at the Memphis State game described on Page 229 where with 45 seconds left and up by 5, an MSU player stepped in the foul lane losing the Tigers a one and one and probably the game. Yes, Al left the court with both hands raised. Raised in what he later called the "Irish salute", middle finger extended. Al had incited the crowd, touched us with his enthusiasm. When he came later to call some Keith Lee games, he fondly remembered the game and how he left the field. This is the "Al" the country knew and loved.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
This well written book about Al McGuire traces his life's ups and downs from New York to Milwaukee. It provides fascinating insights into the unique character of Coach Al, and recounts many of his most legendary moments as a coach, and as a man. I especially enjoyed the behind-the-scenes tales as told by many of Al's closest friends, former players and aquaintances. This book also provides insight into the evolution of modern prime-time college basketball and recalls in wonderful detail the days when Marquette wore "bumblebee" striped uniforms (which were later banned) and the NIT was king. I rate this book Five Stars for any fan of zen or college hoops. Or to use a McGuireism; this book is seashells and balloons! Greg W. Honolulu, Hawaii
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jim Foley (foleyjt@aol.com) on November 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
The book is must reading for those of us who only remotely knew of the specifics of the Coach. It provides wonderful insight into a great leader, who never gave up his individuality, and certainly has made a permanent place for himself in college basketball. The author did an excellent job of research and provides a throughly researched journey into Al's life. Congratulations, Declan. I look forward to your next venture. It is good to see success coming from St. Pascal's
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