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If You Lived Here: The City in Art, Theory, and Social Activism : A Project by Martha Rosier (Discussions in Contemporary Culture) Paperback – September 1, 1998


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If You Lived Here: The City in Art, Theory, and Social Activism : A Project by Martha Rosier (Discussions in Contemporary Culture) + Decoys and Disruptions: Selected Writings, 1975--2001 (October Books)
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Product Details

  • Series: Discussions in Contemporary Culture (Book 6)
  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: New Press, The (September 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 156584498X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565844988
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,823,179 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This volume documents the present crisis in American urban housing policies and portrays how artists, through the medium of a Dia Foundation-sponsored art event and within the context of neighborhood organizations, have fought against government neglect, shortsighted housing policies and unfettered real estate speculation. Through essays, photographs, symposiums, architectural plans and the reproduction of works from the series of exhibitions organized by artist Rosler, the book serves a number of functions: it's a practical manual for community organizing; a history of housing and homelessness in New York City and around the country; and an outline of what a humane housing policy might encompass for the American city. Essays by Rosler, filmmaker Yvonne Rainer as well as contributions by social critic Marshall Berman and a variety of community activists, filmmakers, architects, artists, historians and social critics include discussion of issues such as whether artists have special housing needs, gentrification and displacement, and the conditions and causes of homelessness. Wallis is an editor at Art in America.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is an indispensable resource for anyone interested in questions of urbanism and housing in advanced societies, from architecture to urban planning to homelessness.
It is especially useful for the discussion of some of the ways that artists, architects, activists, and planners have responded to successive city and housing crises. It offers theoretical and historical documents but also art projects and transcripts of public forums.
I found it very helpful in thinking about the issues and in suggesting ways to address similar questions.
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3 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
Economically privlidged white males who edit books like this (i. e., Brian Wallis, who edits many such compiliations) need to recognize that it is Difference, not seperation from white male patriarchal paradigms, which constructs the most significant art work today. Somehow, white males always make it seem like it's about themselves....
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