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You Were Born for This: Seven Keys to a Life of Predictable Miracles Hardcover – September 15, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Multnomah Books; First Edition edition (September 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1601421826
  • ISBN-13: 978-1601421821
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (166 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #179,276 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bruce Wilkinson is recognized as one of the world’s foremost Christian teachers and speakers. But he is best known as the author of the New York Times #1 bestseller, The Prayer of Jabez, and other bestsellers including A Life God Rewards, Secrets of the Vine, and The Dream Giver. He is the founder of WorldTeach, a global initiative to train Bible teachers in every nation. Wilkinson also founded Dream for Africa, a humanitarian agency that has taken on AIDS, orphan care and hunger in sub-Saharan Africa. Bruce and his wife, Darlene, have three children and six grandchildren. They live outside Atlanta.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

A New Way to See the World

You were born to expect a miracle today

What if I told you
I’m certain you missed a miracle yesterday? And not just any miracle but one that Heaven wanted to do through you to significantly change someone’s life for the better–maybe your own?

I would understand if you were doubtful.

But right alongside that doubt, most of us can identify a nearly universal experience. Almost everyone in the world–whatever their religious belief–can point to an event in their lives that seemed directly orchestrated by Heaven, that seemed impossible to explain without using words like “I can’t believe what just happened! That was a miracle!” We call these experiences divine coincidences, miracle moments, supernatural provisions.

Whatever we call them, we tend to value such events so highly that we recount them over and over, often for years. “I’ll never forget the time…,” we say, or “Sooner or later my daughter is going to tell you about…”
Why do we remember such events so clearly? I think it’s because we feel that we have been touched by Heaven. It’s as if God Himself stepped through the curtain that separates the seen from the unseen to make something wonderful happen for us, something only He could do.

But here’s the best part. In the experience we hear a personal and unforgettable message from God. Something like, I’m here. I care about you. I can do for you what you cannot do for yourself. Beginning with this near-universal experience, this book asks a few simple but intriguing questions:

• Why are these experiences of the miraculous so rare for most people?
• What if Heaven actually wanted you to experience them on a regular basis?
• What if ordinary people like you and me are invited to partner with God to deliver miracles to others?

If these questions put a picture in your mind of people everywhere walking around expecting to be a part of miracle moments on a regular basis, you’re not far wrong.

A mysterious encounter
Let me tell you about a mysterious encounter I had in a restaurant outside Denver with a waiter named Jack. I call it mysterious because on the surface everything looked so ordinary. Five friends at a table for six, waiters coming and going, voices, clatter–just what you’d expect in a busy restaurant. But by the time dinner was over, we all knew beyond a doubt that we’d been present for a divine appointment.
It was as if God Himself had walked up and said, “Thank you for saving Me a place. I’ve been wanting to do something for Jack.”

Here’s what happened.

During the course of the meal, Jack had served us well. But apart from the usual exchanges about the menu and our orders, we hadn’t spoken much. Around the table, meanwhile, the conversation revolved around some of Jesus’more extreme teachings–ones like “Ask, and you will receive” and “It is more blessed to give than to receive.” During the conversation I felt unexpectedly nudged by Heaven to try something I’d never done before. At the same time I sensed it was meant to involve Jack.

My experiment involved putting three hundred dollars “at risk.” Now, don’t let the amount throw you. The money wasn’t mine, and believe it or not, the person who was letting me carry it around was expecting me to give it away. (But more about that in a later chapter.)

When Jack came by to refill the water glasses, I posed a question. “Have you ever heard the saying ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive’?”

“Yes, I have,” he said.

“Do you believe that?”

“Sure, I guess I do,” he said, looking puzzled.

“Good!” I said. “I have an interesting opportunity for you.” I placed a hundred-dollar bill on the table. “You have an unusual choice, Jack. You can either receive this hundred dollars as a gift, not a tip…”

I paused. I definitely had Jack’s attention, and the two couples with me
didn’t appear to be breathing.

I looked at Jack. “Or you can say no to the money and instead give each of us a dessert. But this would be you buying the desserts, not the restaurant. You can’t do both things, and there’s no right or wrong. So what would you like to do–give or receive?”

Jack just stood there holding the water pitcher. He asked twice if I was serious. Then finally he said, “I’ll take the hundred dollars.”

True to my word, I handed him the bill.

“Thank you!” he said. Then he walked back to the kitchen.

After he left and my friends started breathing again, we all tried to figure out what had just happened. Was my unusual test about giving and receiving even fair? What was Jack thinking now? And what in the world was he saying to the crew in the kitchen?

All the while I was feeling increasingly uncomfortable. You see, earlier I had slipped another two hundred dollars under my plate. If the waiter had chosen to buy us desserts and not take the hundred–believing that it is more blessed to give than to receive–I was going to give him the hidden two hundred dollars. I had really hoped he would make the self-sacrificial choice because I’d strongly sensed that God wanted to encourage him with the larger sum.

The next time he came around, I said, “I’m curious, Jack. Do you feel like you made the right choice?”
“Absolutely!” he said excitedly. “In fact, it was a miracle. You see, I’m a single dad.” He pulled out his wallet and proudly showed us a photo of his three-year-old son. “Isn’t he something!” he said with a big smile. Then he explained his reaction. “I have to work three jobs during four days of the week just so I can take care of my son the other three days when my ex-wife works. But I’m having a tough time making ends meet. Just this morning I had to mail my alimony check of a hundred dollars even though my account was down to zero. Driving to work this afternoon, I actually prayed, ‘God, please! I need an extra hundred dollars, and I need it tonight!’ ”

Well, I was speechless, and so were my friends. How could we have known of our waiter’s crisis or of his prayer for a hundred dollars?

Then it was my turn to explain. I told him that even if he had decided to give instead of receive, I’d planned to give him the hundred dollars. “But now that I know your story, I agree. You made the right choice.”
Suddenly I knew what needed to happen next. “You have to know that none of this money was mine,” I told him. “The owner wanted me to pass it on as a kind of message to the right person. And I’m sure that person was you.”

I reached under the plate for the other two hundred. “Obviously God wanted you to have the hundred dollars, and He wants you to have this too.”

What God thinks is normal
What just happened here? Let’s break it down:

• Jack drove to work that evening to wait tables, but he brought
with him a secret, pressing need.
• I had come to Colorado from Atlanta on business and ended
up having dinner with friends in Jack’s restaurant.
• Unbeknown to Jack or my friends, I was prepared to meet
someone’s financial need with money that wasn’t mine.
• By the end of the evening, God had used one person to deliver
something that met a big need for another person–and in a
way that was clearly miraculous to everyone involved.

You might react differently to what happened around that table. You might think, for example, Well, I don’t have a hundred-dollar bill lying around. And if I did, why would I give it to a stranger? For that matter, how would I figure out whom to give it to?

We’ll look closely at these reactions and more like them in the pages ahead. You’ll see, I promise, that God is just as likely to have plans for five dollars or twenty dollars as He is for a hundred dollars and that He never asks you or me to serve Him in a way that doesn’t fit us personally and perfectly.

For now, though, put yourself in the story of our dinner with Jack. Imagine how you would have felt leaving that table and knowing you had played an active role in delivering God’s provision for a young man’s desperate need. Better yet, imagine a lifestyle of such encounters, where God works through you in unexplainable ways to do a miracle–and on a regular basis.

This kind of life is not only possible but is what God thinks of as normal when He thinks of you.
You see, He did not place you on this earth to notice Him at work only once or twice in your whole life. He did not create you to consistently miss out on the wonder of His presence and power.

The truth is, you were born to live a supernatural life doing God’s work by God’s power. You were born to walk out your door each morning believing that God will use you to deliver a necessary miracle today.
This book will show you how.

The Everyday Miracle Territory
When it comes to miracles, most people I know see the world as divided
in two.

On the far left is a region we could call the Land of Signs and Wonders. In this land amazing miracles seem to happen a lot, although only for a select few. Mostly this world reveals itself on television, in a few unusual churches, and in faraway places. Still, Signs and Wonders is a remarkable place. In this land the blind regain their sight and invalids throw away their canes to run around like school kids.

On t...

More About the Author

Bruce Wilkinson is recognized as one of the world's foremost Christian teachers and speakers. But he is best known as the author of the New York Times #1 bestseller, The Prayer of Jabez, and other bestsellers including A Life God Rewards, Secrets of the Vine, and The Dream Giver. He is the founder of WorldTeach, a global initiative to train Bible teachers in every nation. Wilkinson also founded Dream for Africa, a humanitarian agency that has taken on AIDS, orphan care and hunger in sub-Saharan Africa. Bruce and his wife, Darlene, have three children and six grandchildren. They live outside Atlanta..

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Customer Reviews

Bruce Wilkinson has written a book that he believes will help us all live a life of miracles.
Ittybits
While the content of this book was good, I do admit that I felt sleepy nearly every time I began to read.
JG
You Were Born For This by Bruce Wilkinson is a how-to book written in a very straightforward manner.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Joel Klampert on September 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I recieved this book in the mail a few weeks ago and I have to admit I read it with preconceived notions or judgments about what I would be reading. The title and little book blurbs caused great concern that what I was to read was The prayer of Jabez meets the Prosperity Gospel with a few words changed. I was completely floored when I got into that it was none of that.

This is a book that teaches you how to be open to God, how to listen for His prompts and or detours, and then most importantly how to act on it. So much of the Christian world these days is all talk and this book teaches you to take notice and the miracles God does and jump in and be a part of them.

I walked away from reading this excited and ready to be used by God.

I encourage everybody to read this book and read it with an open mind to what God has for you in your day to day.
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57 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Chautona on September 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book is about seeing the miraculous around us and being a part of delivering and receiving those "miracles". I must confess, I have a very difficult time using the word miracle. People often mock me for that-- they assume it's a lack of belief in them or a discomfort with God so directly intervening in our lives. They are wrong. I am uncomfortable with the loose way the word is tossed around. We use miracle these days like we do love. We say we love ice cream, pizza, a good TV show, our friend, our mother, and our Lord. We also facetiously use it to say we love that which we do not. Miracle has become just as equally and liberally sprinkled over our conversation and I'm uncomfortable with it. I keep trying to teach myself not to misuse love and I don't want to get into the habit of saying that the amazing is a miracle.

I define miracle very strictly. To me, a miracle is a supernatural event that runs contrary to nature. So I'm even one of those obnoxious people who is not comfortable talking about the "miracle of birth". I don't see birth as a miracle. It is a carefully designed and orchestrated event that God set into the natural motion of living on this earth. It is marvelous, wondrous, amazing-- but it's not a miracle. Turning water into wine is a miracle. Feeding five thousand with enough food for four or five tops-- that's a miracle. Especially when you consider that there were LEFTOVERS. It isn't a miracle if you meet a need that you didn't know was a need. It's wonderful, God be praised and all glory to Him for leading you in that direction so He could bless someone through you, but it's not a miracle.

So, reading a book with the subtitle : 7 Keys to a Life of Predictable Miracles was kind of difficult to do.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By LadyD on September 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I love this book because it is one that you will not want to put down. A book filled with hope and inspiration, refection and personal challenge. I have read all of Bruce's books and can easily say he is a great teacher of Christian principles.

What I learned the most from his book is how to be a unique, personal conduit for good in helping another fellow man. I have received many miracles in my lifetime and have witnessed others being blessed by someone's generosity towards them. But to experience being a part of a divine appointment for someone else and seeing them reap a blessing by bestowing seeds of kindness, meeting physical and emotional needs, plus uplifting and encouraging another person is truly a wonderful feeling of fulfillment and purpose as to why we're here and what's life all about really.

I could relate to the everyday miracles shared in Bruce's writings. This book will inspire you as you read about real stories of how just one person can make a difference in someone's life. What grabbed my heart was the simple outline and guidance on "how to" go about meeting another person's need. What makes this particular book a winner is the dynamic duo force of universal identity (I have a great need) and the application (God's work through you).
1 need + your part = a miracle... 5+ stars! I highly recommend this book to you!

Galations 5:25 "Since we are living by the Spirit, let us follow the spirits leading in every part of our lives." In the book, You Were Born For This, you'll learn to recognize God's gentle nudges to be a blessing to others!
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61 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Darryl Dash on September 18, 2009
Format: Hardcover
If you haven't heard of The Prayer of Jabez, you run in different circles than I do. The bestselling book took two obscure verses from a genealogy in the Old Testament and tried to tell readers how "to discover how they can release God's miraculous power and experience the blessings God longs to give each of us...Readers who commit to offering the same prayer on a regular basis will find themselves extravagantly blessed by God, and agents of His miraculous power, in everyday life."

Now, four years later, Bruce Wilkinson offers us You Were Born for This: 7 Keys to a Life of Predictable Miracles. Wilkinson says:

The Prayer of Jabez showed ordinary people how to ask God to greatly expand their opportunities to serve Him. You Were Born for This shows ordinary people how to be intentional about and skilled at inviting the miraculous into the midst of that larger life.

Think of You Were Born for This as Jabez to the miracle power. [!!!]

My wife knows I wasn't a big fan of Jabez. Was she ever surprised to see this book on my bedside table.

Here's what's good about this book: it's a good challenge to our low expectations. Reading this book reminded me of how much I tend to live as a functional deist. I needed the reminder in this book to rely on God's power and to expect him to work in ways that can't otherwise be explained.

On the other hand, this book has significant weaknesses.

It's formulaic. Reading "Four Keys to a Life of Miracles" and "Five Signals That Guide a Miracle Delivery" makes me cringe.

It trivializes miracles.
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