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You'll Never Know Book Two: "Collateral Damage" (You'll Never Know) Hardcover – October 18, 2010


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You'll Never Know Book Two: "Collateral Damage" (You'll Never Know) + You'll Never Know Book Three: "Soldier's Heart" (Vol. 3)  (You'll Never Know)
Price for both: $41.45

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Product Details

  • Series: You'll Never Know (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics; Reprint edition (October 18, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1606994182
  • ISBN-13: 978-1606994184
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 0.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,109,910 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. In the first volume of Tyler's planned trilogy of graphic memoirs, she dug into the eruptive, violent memories of her father's WWII experiences while simultaneously dealing with a husband who decided to go find himself and leave her with a daughter to raise. This second volume is no less rich and overwhelming. Tyler gets back to the business of detailing her father's war stories--difficult given that he is "one of those guys who closed it off and never talked about it"--as well as coming to terms with her already touchy parents' increasingly ornery attitudes. Closing the circle somewhat is Tyler's concern over her daughter's troubled nature, which seems to mirror her own wild past. While the language of Chicago-raised and Cincinnati-based Tyler has a winningly self-deprecating Midwestern spareness to it, her art is a lavishly prepared kaleidoscope of watercolors and finely etched drawings, all composed to look like the greatest family photo album of all time. The story's honest self-revelations and humane evocations of family dramas are tremendously moving. Tyler's book could well leave readers simultaneously eager to see the third volume, but also nervous about the traumas, home front and war front, that it might contain. (Sept.) (c)
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From Booklist

In the second installment of her trilogy exploring her father’s WWII experiences and their lingering effects, Tyler delves deeper not just into the events of the war but also into other personal crises affecting her family. The titular collateral damage applies not just in the military sense but also to other unintended consequences, such as the effects that the brutal breakup of Tyler’s marriage had on her troubled teenage daughter. Despite widening the focus to encompass the hardships of other family members—particularly her mother, who suffered a trauma that rivals any battlefield experience—Tyler skillfully ties the various events that occurred over a span of five decades into a cohesive, affecting narrative. Her visual approach—supple ink drawings augmented by muted watercolor overlays—ideally conveys the jumble of harsh travails, loving moments, and resilient humor that characterizes not just Tyler’s life but universal experience. Tyler’s work represents autobiographical comics at their most personal, perceptive, and powerful. --Gordon Flagg

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Scrapbooks usually present a carefully edited version of reality. Even if the snapshots are candid, a few are left out and a few are never taken.

Carol Tyler has chosen a scrapbook format for her memoir series You'll Never Know, but the editing is the reverse of the usual--instead of airbrushing over her family's troubles, she focuses on them. She applies the same sort of creativity that other scrapbook makers use, using different styles and formats for different parts of her story, but the overall effect is more acid than cheerful.

The first book in the trilogy, A Good and Decent Man, introduced Tyler's father, Chuck, as one of those repressed, can-do Greatest Generation types, more interested in fixing things than discussing his feelings. His daughter is the opposite, sensitive to his moods and his lack of affection and curious about his experiences during the war. She is also on an emotional roller-coaster of her own, as her husband has left her for another woman.

The story is told in bits and pieces--Tyler focuses on her own life, shows vignettes of her family when she was growing up, and tells her father's story in a carefully constrained format, presented as photos carefully lined up in a scrapbook. This careful narrative is the spine of the story, and it is told in her father's measured voice. When emotion intrudes, the boundaries dissolve and Tyler uses a freer style.

The second volume picks up the story from the first, filling in more background about the family and the effects of Chuck's wartime experiences without revealing much more of the deepest trauma, the one that affected him the most.
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By John Bowes on July 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover
The damage war has done, passes through the generations. Bit by bit, the author discovers her father's trauma, and begins to understand how she and her child have been impacted. Emotionally devastating. Well done.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Ljunggren on February 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I am reluctant to be too critical of this graphic novel, since it clearly means an enormous amount to the author, but I have the same basic complaint about it as I did the first installment. Tyler says she is trying to tell us the story of how her father's horrific experiences in World War Two affected and warped him and yet by the end of this work we know even less about the events which damaged him than we did the first time round. We learn an awful lot about the author, her divorce, her parents' challenges and problems and what it is like raising a difficult daughter single-handed, yet her father remains an elusive (and not very attractive) mystery.
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