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Young Hearts Crying (Vintage Contemporaries) Kindle Edition

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Length: 434 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“To me and to many other writers of my generation, the work of Richard Yates came as a liberating force. . . . He was one of the most important writers of the second half of the century.”—Robert Stone


From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Richard Yates was born in 1926 in New York and lived in California. His prize-winning stories began to appear in 1953 and his first novel, Revolutionary Road, was nominated for the National Book Award in 1961. He is the author of eight other works, including the novels A Good School, The Easter Parade, and Disturbing the Peace, and two collections of short stories, Eleven Kinds of Loneliness and Liars in Love. He died in 1992.

Product Details

  • File Size: 917 KB
  • Print Length: 434 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0307455963
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (October 27, 2010)
  • Publication Date: October 27, 2010
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0047747HY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #447,803 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Richard Yates was born in 1926 in New York and lived in California. His prize-winning stories began to appear in 1953 and his first novel, Revolutionary Road, was nominated for the National Book Award in 1961. He is the author of eight other works, including the novels A Good School, The Easter Parade, and Disturbing the Peace, and two collections of short stories, Eleven Kinds of Loneliness and Liars in Love. He died in 1992.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Doc Occula VINE VOICE on November 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
I think I've found my author. You know, that person whose work you are more and more compelled to read every time you read something else they've written? Even if that work is ultimately depressing or heart-wrenching or terrifying?

'Young Hearts Crying' has been re-issued by Vintage Contemporaries with a pile of lousy editing errors (come ON, guys!!) and some stunning cover art direction, and thank heaven for it. I was having trouble finding Yates in used bookstores, and now, because of 'Revolutionary Road,' he's baaaa-ack. Back with all the agony of the 'Age of Anxiety,' with a fundamentally depressing group of delusional, failing characters, and with a plot that lowers the reader deeper and deeper into their neuroses and desires, both deserved and ridiculous. I was fascinated with the cruelty with which Yates methodically tore apart each character, so that their whims gained equal weight as their real work. How does he do that, and with such diffident, casual prose? Amazing!

I'm sure Yates's battered vision of a lost era isn't for everybody. Aficionados of 'Mad Men,' with its glossy looks and measured pain, might find the source material too unrelenting, too stricken. But if you're up for it, this is a pretty extraordinarily written book.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Charlie Stella on March 21, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Young Hearts is yet another "must read" Richard Yates novel loaded with killer scene closers (one that had me speak out loud on the staten island ferry this week) ... another that left me uplifted (the end of the book).

Yates knew people; their speak and their demons and he was a master at presenting emotionally crippled lives in raw form ... whether they sink or swim.

READING is what it's all about, amici ... and Yates' Young Hearts Crying is truly a MUST READ.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By irista on November 29, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What does it take to be an artist? Is it important to be one? This book is a touching discourse on those questions.

After comtemplating a couple of weeks on this book I am going to up my rating as I considered the questions that the novel was asking and actually believe it is even a better (more realistic) piece than the dramatic Rev-Road. And just as good as the more celebrated "Easter Parade".)

Often it is said how sad and hopeless Yates' stories are, but they are actually enjoyable in the truth when one reached that "ah ha" moment in the climactic moments. While the characters do not vibrate off the page, the events and conclusions do - I feel that although his characters do not have glorious victories, they are given a fair chance at an almost zen like acceptance --- I do not want to give anything away, but readers must really watch what goes on in the very last pages to get the the message of these tales.

I read the original, negative NYT review for this and was amazed at by what I consider the shallowness of the writing that was and still is accepted as the "The Newspaper of Record"
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By K. Dain Ruprecht on April 30, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all, the title is terrible (is it supposed to be a joke?) and so is the cover design. But getting past that, this late novel by Richard Yates is probably worth reading by those who appreciate his clean, clear-eyed writing style. This was written in 1984, when I believe he was living in squalor and obscurity, and, like Revolutionary Road, concerns the romantic and artistic ambitions of a couple. Lucy and Michael share a background of excellent education and interest in higher culture. He is an aspiring poet, and she, well... she doesn't really do anything but doesn't really have to because her family is rich as hell. But Michael insists they don't live off her money. He gets a 9- to-5 writing for a trade magazine called "Chain Store Age" (a better title for a book perhaps?) while working on his poetry, and Lucy raises their daughter on his salary while using "her" money for therapy. Their sole diversion is hobnobbing with artists and writers, at whose parties Michael invariably drinks too much and punches someone in the stomach. This lovely couple soon separate and long years of romantic and artistic frustration ensue for both. This novel lacks the coherence of Revolutionary Road and The Easter Parade, and yet it feels far more personal, often uncomfortably so. Yet Michael, Lucy, and even their neglected daughter end up in better places in the end than the characters in those other books. But that's not saying much. Yates is not interested in writing about life's successes, but rather it's constant struggles and humiliations. Probably not most people's idea of a good read, but still better than most.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steve VINE VOICE on January 1, 2014
Format: Paperback
Young Hearts Crying is a good but not great novel from a gifted writer. Richard Yates captures the angst and hopelessness of the human condition with unflinching honesty. Yates’ ability to write cringingly realistic, desperate, disillusioned, and unstable dreamers makes for a breathtaking read at times. However, in this novel, he brings a strong presence of contempt for his characters, which hints at self-loathing and self-pity. Additionally, it’s a good 75-100 pages too long with unnecessary chapters full of marginal characters that do little more than reiterate how adrift the Davenports are in their pursuit of something meaningful in their lives. The final chapter comes too late to offer anything more than what the reader is likely to have grasped a dozen or so chapters earlier.

Written in three parts, the first focusing on the couple and the last two on their lives separately, YHC is a blunt portrayal of two people, Michael and Lucy Davenport, over the course of several decades in the mid-twentieth century. They want to be artists for all the wrong reasons, even though they go through the machinations of suffering for their art; it only shines a light into the hollowness of their dreams. Yates skewers the artsy crowd with the precision of someone who is painfully aware of the fickle nature of something as nebulous as “art.” While Michael has some success, his psychological issues never allow for a true appreciation of his accomplishments. Lucy is less successful, owing as much to her lack of skill as well as her pretension, which is fueled by her frequent fits of fantasy. Both are needy and vain; harboring an unquenchable thirst for the approval of others, particularly their peers.
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