Young People 1940 G CC

Amazon Instant Video

(55) IMDb 6.6/10
Available in HD
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A show business family leaves the great white way and heads for a farm in New England. What results is the difficulties they have before they are accepted by the community.

Starring:
Shirley Temple, Jack Oakie
Runtime:
1 hour 20 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Young People

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Allan Dwan
Starring Shirley Temple, Jack Oakie
Supporting actors Charlotte Greenwood, Arleen Whelan, George Montgomery, Kathleen Howard, Minor Watson, Frank Swann, Frank Sully, Mae Marsh, Sarah Edwards, Irving Bacon, Charles Halton, Arthur Aylesworth, Olin Howland, Billy Wayne, Harry Tyler, Darryl Hickman, Shirley Mills, Diane Fisher
Studio Fox
MPAA rating G (General Audience)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

It ranks up at one of the three best in my opinion!
crowbargreen
They were always a delight to watch when I was a child and I still love them today and want to share them with my grandchildren.
Lyndon Foster
I give it Five Stars because the movie makes me happy and leaves me smiling.
L Tilden

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "sopera" on February 19, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
"Young People" was Shirley Temple's final film under contract at Twentieth-Century Fox. Although she would go on to make some excellent movies as a teenager and young adult, "Young People" effectively marked the end of her reign as a child star.
In this picture Temple plays Wendy Ballentine, the adopted daughter of two vaudeville stars (Jack Oakie and Charlotte Greenwood). She literally grows up onstage (just as Temple grew up before film audiences in the 1930s), stealing scenes from her parents and becoming an integral part of the act.
However, the Ballentines yearn for a more stable and "normal" existence, and, thus, retire from show business to take up residence in a hamlet in the countryside. It isn't an easy transition: the townsfolk seem to have a poor opinion of "show people" and shun the Ballentine family. Wendy also has trouble adjusting to life offstage: she reads "Variety" at home, teaches her entire class to do splashy musical theatre numbers and tap dances around her living room.
Of course, all ends well. On their way out of town (returning to the warm world of vaudeville), Wendy and her parents rescue a local child in a storm. The Ballentines save the day, the town is grateful, and the residents finally learn to peacefully coexist with their colorful neighbors.
Temple's Fox swan song was not her strongest picture story-wise, but it did inadvertently give her the chance to say farewell. One of the most touching scenes in the film is the Ballentine's last performance at the theatre, where, after giving a show-stopping tap number, Wendy addresses the audience and thanks them for their support over the years.
Oakie and Greenwood, as the senior Ballentines, gave wonderful performances. They actually were ex-vaudevillians, and were given some great opportunities to show off their numerous talents. Temple, of course, was also top-notch in her dance and acting.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Byron Kolln HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on June 24, 2009
Format: DVD
YOUNG PEOPLE (1940) was, despite it's mix of the regular Temple movie trappings, an even bigger flop at the box office than THE BLUE BIRD, released earlier that same year. Back in black-and-white, and with the "child star" cuteness becoming a slightly uncomfortable fit for the rapidly maturing twelve-year-old Temple, it lacks a certain zest; although Temple gives a great performance and is matched every step of the way by her co-stars Jack Oakie and Charlotte Greenwood.

The story follows vaudeville team Joe and Kitty Ballantine (Oakie and Greenwood) and their adopted daughter Wendy (Temple) as they attempt to retire on a farm in New England, only to find hostility and scorn from their old-fashioned, small-minded neighbours.

This was Shirley's last movie for Fox. After her two failures in 1940 (and with no scripts on the immediate horizon), it was decided, in an agreement between producer Darryl F. Zanuck and Temple's parents, to finally terminate her contract. Oddly enough, one of the songs in the film ("Young People") contains lyrics that keenly reflected Temple's personal situation at the time. Audiences wanted Shirley to remain a curly-haired moppet, Temple wanted to grow up. Something had to give...

YOUNG PEOPLE features a clever prologue in which we actually "see" the Wendy/Temple character grow up whilst performing in the Ballantine's act. This was achieved by using a body double for long-shots, intercut with footage of Shirley herself performing "The Beaches of Waikiki" from 1935's CURLY TOP, and "Baby, Take a Bow" from 1934's STAND UP AND CHEER! Despite it's shortcomings, YOUNG PEOPLE is a solid movie and a worthy and touching coda to Shirley Temple's Fox years.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
My six year old daughter and I watched this film together and enjoyed it very much. Shirley Temple as always, gave it her best, as well as the other actors. The story is touching and teaches children about the importance of being open to change. It teaches about caring for your fellow man, and being a good citizen. I would recommend this for parents and young children to watch together.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G. Mcsweeney on November 13, 2009
Format: DVD
Shirley Temple movies are almost a pick me upper in difficult times. My family and I like to watch these from time to time. Product arrived on time and in good condition
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lonnie E. Holder HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 10, 2007
Format: VHS Tape
Shirley Temple's movie career was past its peak when she appeared in this movie. She was twelve years old and as perky as ever, but her popularity was waning for a variety of reasons.

Shirley plays Wendy Ballantine, an orphan in the care of Joe Ballantine (Jack Oakie, who had more than 100 movie and television appearances) and Kit Ballantine (Charlotte Greenwood, who some may remember in "Oklahoma!"). Joe and Kit raise Wendy as though she was their own daughter. This film uses clips of Shirley from her earlier movies to show her at various ages. The gimmick generally works.

Joe, Kit and Wendy are a popular vaudeville act, but being in show business puts them on the road and in hotels constantly. Kit and Joe decide that it would be better for Wendy to settle down. The trio settles on a farm purchased by Wendy's late father.

Unfortunately, the small town near the farm is full of ultra-conservative people who have a dislike and distrust of anything new. By new, I mean anything that has existed for less than 50 years. Some of the townspeople do everything possible to drive the Ballantines out of town. The last straw seems to be when Wendy organizes her classmates into a rousing vaudeville style show, which somehow upsets the ultra-conservative sensibilities of the townspeople.

After the continuously offensive treatment by the townspeople, the Ballantines decide to leave town and go back to show business. On their way to the train station their car gets stuck in the mud, caused by a powerful storm. The Ballantines head for shelter and encounter a group of children stranded by the storm. The Ballantines shepherd the children to a nearby house, but one of the children is missing!

Will the missing child be found?
Read more ›
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