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379 of 394 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Younger Is as Younger Does
Of all the anti-aging books I've seen, this is one of most laid back and entertaining. It's written by two guys. Harry, the doctor, covers the science aspects of aging, while the other guy, Chris, talks about applying the info.

The book is centered around "Harry's Rules." These are seven rules for the reader to follow. They include such things as "Quit eating...
Published on January 5, 2008 by C.J.

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141 of 160 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent primer for entering the last 3rd.
First of all, this book is funny and well written. The thing that really stood out for me in this book was that it gives you an accurate idea on what to expect from age 50 on. Being in my late 50s, I can see from personal experience that these authors know what they are talking about. Living in Las Vegas I see men with what we call in Las Vegas "buffet bellys" (huge...
Published on January 16, 2005 by Amazon Customer


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379 of 394 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Younger Is as Younger Does, January 5, 2008
Of all the anti-aging books I've seen, this is one of most laid back and entertaining. It's written by two guys. Harry, the doctor, covers the science aspects of aging, while the other guy, Chris, talks about applying the info.

The book is centered around "Harry's Rules." These are seven rules for the reader to follow. They include such things as "Quit eating crap" or "Exercise six days a week for the rest of your life." While they might seem to be basic pieces of information, they are sound advice and have some science behind them.

All-in-all, I found this to be a very informative and amusing book and I'd recommend it to anyone who is looking for a book on aging. The realistic key here is not to go into things thinking you're going to STOP the aging process, rather think of SLOWING DOWN the aging process. Aging readers may also find Bulletproof Your Shoulder helpful as 54% of people over the age of 60 get a torn rotator cuff.
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100 of 105 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What did you do with my husband?, May 14, 2007
By 
Freda L. Clarke (Pompano Beach, FL USA) - See all my reviews
I have been trying for years to get my husband interested in exercise and eating better. I gave him this book just before he went on a trip and he actually read it. He is now a changed person - he rides his bike regularly and purchased a heart monitor. This weekend he bought a set of weights and starting this week he is going to my personal trainer for three sessions to get a schedule he can follow at home. I saw him the other day rereading sections of the book. Nothing has worked to motivate him until he read this book! Thanks so much to the authors.
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73 of 80 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable, readable, informative, July 6, 2006
I saw this book in a local bookstore last winter, flipped through it, thought it looked interesting, and came on to Amazon to see what the reviews were saying. They were okay, not great, I had other things to read, so I decided to pass on this one. I ran across it at my local library a month ago, and decided to check it out. I'm glad I did. The book is written in a simple, conversational and very readable style and I learned a few things. Frankly, when I'm plowing through information on diet, nutrition and exercise, I prefer something friendly and easy to read.

Several reviewers complained that the book is basic, common sense information padded with a lot of "fluff." Well, sure. Why not? Americans obviously need basic, common sense information. Look at the way books giving inflated promises and ridiculous diet plans tend to fly off the shelves and garner rave reviews ... and those are nothing but fluff, nonsense and padding.

The "fluff" in this book entertained me (for the most part). Some of the manly-man bits about running down gazelles and eating them raw got a little old, but the basic message is one that most Americans need to take to heart: use it, or lose it. I watched both of my grandfathers become senile and old beyond their years. Both of them died in their seventies, miserable, angry and sick, and much of what ailed them could've been cured by diet and exercise. Instead, they chose to sit on the couch, watch TV, and complain about everything.

I'm 39 years old. I'm already noticing that when I pull a muscle or twist a joint, it takes much longer to heal than it did. My body has stopped growing, healing has slowed down, and now it's up to me to resist the pull of the tide. I can spend the next 40 or 50 years slowing down and puffing up, or I can be flat-bellied, trim, muscular and full of health for a long time. This book gives some good, basic, no-nonsense advice to achieving that end.

One negative reviewer griped that sure, he knows exercise is good for him, but that the authors don't touch on motivation and how to get yourself to stop eating pizza, get off the couch, and go for a run. Well, they do talk about that: "Suck it up and do your job." As a long-time sedentary person myself, I'm realizing that it's really the only thing I can do. There isn't a magic formula I can chant to make my morning bike ride more fun - it just takes doing it, whether I enjoy it or not, and eventually ... I'll begin to enjoy it. I took up snowboarding about four years ago at the age of 35. I hated it the first season, tolerated it the second season, enjoyed it the third, loved it the fourth, and now I can hardly wait to get onto the slopes. It does get easier, but you've got to force yourself out there at first. If you can't force yourself, then get a friend to help you. Make a bet. Sign up for a class. Do something. But at the very bottom of it all, you're still going to have to get off the overstuffed recliner and "just do it." I know, it sucks, but ultimately it's going to be worth it!
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141 of 160 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent primer for entering the last 3rd., January 16, 2005
By 
Amazon Customer "smart reader" (Las Vegas, Nevada United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
First of all, this book is funny and well written. The thing that really stood out for me in this book was that it gives you an accurate idea on what to expect from age 50 on. Being in my late 50s, I can see from personal experience that these authors know what they are talking about. Living in Las Vegas I see men with what we call in Las Vegas "buffet bellys" (huge gut) I seen old people so overweight and out of shape that the only pleasure they have left is gorging themselves at buffets. The science in this book makes very good sense. This book should be a "must read" for anyone entering their 50s-60s who is intrested in staying alive, possibly missing some of the scairest of the diseases and being able to have a sex life in their later years. I cant recommend the book enough for that age group of men and women. I meant to give this book 5 stars, but I cant seem to change the ratings
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I am in my 30s and I loved this book, December 14, 2006
By 
My dad gave me this book a few months ago. He gave it to all of his kids. I took and I kinda laughed, thinking, 'Oh man, why on earth would give me this book...live like you are 50 when you are 80? Yeah, thats gonna be helpful for me now. My dad is in terrific shape and he enjoyed reading the book and I decided to check it out.

Yes, the book is geared toward the older population but I was able to take A LOT from it and start using it now. Chris Crowley tackles the book from an older man that is using the tools to look and feel younger and to be healthier. Dr. Lodge discusses why if we do certain things, it will dramatically improve our health and in essence, slow down the aging process and make our latter years healthier and more enjoyable. There were several areas of discussion that I found very useful:

Exercise Now--I am able to continually make excuses about not exercising but they make a great point. Look at exercise as a job that you have to do 6 days a week. Not 3 days a week and not even 5 days a week. You have to do this at least 6 days every week. Its not always easy but it is great advice.

Stop the aging process--Your body wants to stay as young as it can and it has been recently with fast food, television, cars, etc. that people don't do things and don't go out and get exercise or walk around or just staying active. The human body has had to work hard for thousands and thousands of years...it is only the past 100 years where our body is not having to work and our bodies hate that. They want to be moving...they want to get worked out but we often inhibit that need by being lazy.

Older people--I have seen the differences. My dad is 73 and he is a complete machine. He plays tennis 2 days a week, he works out 3 other days and he does exercies for the other 2 days. You compare him to the majority of other people his age and to people 10 years younger and he looks better than 98% of them. That is because he is working out, eating well and enjoying life. My mother is getting on that bandwagon as well and is looking good.

How it affects me today--It has gotten me working toward improving my overall health. I am working out more and I am understand better a lot of what was taught in the book. I see what I want to look like in 20, 30 and 40 years and what I need to do to reach that.

Tone of the book--It initially irritated me in how they switch back and forth between chapters but I ended up looking forward to each new point of view (medical and common man) at the start of each chapter. It is effective. You get the science (Chris Crowley) and you get the common person (Dr. Lodge) talking about what he is doing to improve his health and his life. Crowley displays enthusiasm in what he is doing to improve his life and Dr. Lodge is able to bring the sciences down to a level that I could understand. I enjoyed the book and I see this as a book that can benefit those 50+ but can also be very beneficial for those well under 50.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Book!, January 9, 2007
By 
A Guy in Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN USA) - See all my reviews
A "guy at the gym" told me that this book changed his life- and so I bought it to find out why. The authors recommend that men over 50 engage in serious exercise six days a week- but promise that doing so will stop and even reverse the physical deterioriation that starts to set in ever so gradually as men age. The authors base their recommendations on some recent scientific research and their own observation. The writing style is concise and encouraging- even inspirational- and their recommendations are very straight-forward and uncomplicated. I started following their program six months ago, and have to say that I think I look and feel better. I'm recommending it to other men my age, and I'm also recommending that personal trainers who work with older guys need to read it, too, to get a better understanding of their customer's concerns and needs.
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36 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's about time....in more ways than one!, May 7, 2005
Time is running out, but most of us aren't out running...or bicycling, or skiing, or lifting weights, or dozens of other things we can do to extend the quality years of our lives. Aging should be the same as with food...about getting better, not getting old and rotten. The authors provide a diagram (a blueprint can't be made to fit everybody) for improving the quality of your coming years, and for improving the possible quantity of those years as well. Written with men in mind, it is true for both men and women. As is sometimes said, "A must-read"!
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45 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just do it!, April 3, 2005
By 
Larry Scantlebury (Ypsilanti, MI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Maya Angelou said of Oprah's Book Club, 'I don't like all of the books she recommends (Winfrey) but at least she gets people out to read.'

Sage advice. If it takes the glibness and sarcasm of Chris to get you off the couch, feeling sorry for yourself, riddled with extra pounds while you wheeze your excuses for not exercising, out the door and on the track, Good Lord man, that's OK.

We don't all respond to the platitudes of wise Medical Practitioners citing stories of cholesterol and the C-6 C-10 Mambo. Hell. I'm still trying to figure out the good cholesterol and the baddies. But I do know this. If I do what they say (I've worked out all my life but have been doing it THEIR way for 3 months) I end up feeling awfully good.

Let me repeat that. I don't know if I'm holding back the tide, if I'm Horatio at the bridge or if I'm fooling my body into exchanging decay for more aerobic muscle. I just know that I feel good.

I also appreciate the effort they direct towards our relationships. It's not mush. For men, we forget the axiom of 'dancing with the girl that brought us.' Have fun. Work on your relationship while you work on yourself. Like Chris says. Be a guy. Suck it up. Do it.

I think it's a lifesaver. I bought two more copies for my brothers. Like Ms. Angelou says . . . well, you know what I mean. A great anthem to go into your 50's and 60's with. 5 stars. Larry Scantlebury
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70 of 86 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pseudo science and dogma, November 11, 2011
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At the time this book was published (2004), Chris Crowley (one of the co-authors) was a 70 year old retired lawyer. He retired at 56 and became a fitness fanatic and decided to write a book about it with his primary doctor (Henry S. Lodge, M.D.). As a team, Dr. Lodge was to provide the science and Crowley the enthusiasm. Instead, Dr. Lodge provided the pseudo science and Crowley the dogma.

Dr. Lodge poses as a polymath scientist. But, he is not. He advances theories without supporting them. Much of the science he conveys is wrong. Quoting on page 43: "Worms and snails run their bodies and nervous systems with the same chemicals and hormones you're using right now as you read these words." This is way off. Worms are hermaphrodites and don't have gender related hormones (estrogen, testosterone). Worms and snails don't have the equivalent of a human brain and lack all related neurotransmitters. Also on page 43, he states: "Salmon have the same basic, physical brain you do." No, they don't. He goes on a clumsy page stating he was just referring to the "reptilian brain" that runs all our auto-pilot systems. Well, that's a very small portion of the human brain. On page 245 he states: "we survived because of our limbic brain, dinosaurs did not..." This is an absurd statement. For the record, dinosaurs lived zillions of years before humans. Dinosaurs were wiped out because a meteorite hit the Earth causing a cataclysmic climate change. Humans would not have survived this catastrophe. On page 112: "we function better... on less sleep when we are fit [exercise a lot everyday]." I doubt that. After intense sport activities you actually need much rest including sleep. But, the authors truly feel that their mandatory daily 45 minute to an hour of exercise is worth cutting an hour of your sleep to make it fit into your 50 hour workweek. This is a recipe for burn out, stress, and sport injury. At one point, he also states that people smoking a pack of cigarette a day and being 30 pound overweight had a lower mortality risk than thin sedentary people. Where did they find a representative sample of individuals who smoke a pack a day, are still 30 pound overweight, but exercise nearly an hour a day and did that long enough so one could track their mortality risk? This story does not make sense. Dr. Lodge also advances on page 53 that by 2024 they will confirm that not exercising vigorously at least 6 times a week (as he recommends) will be deemed to be as deadly as smoking two packs of cigarettes a day. That's highly unlikely. On page 68, the subject of Cytokine is far more complex and broader than Dr. Lodge indicated. Dr. Lodge theory is that every day you do not exercise vigorously certain Cytokine types cause your body to chronically decay. But, according to recent research bursts of daily exercises are not as effective as Dr. Lodge indicates. And, it does not compensate for all the sitting around we do. When sitting enzyme activity drops by up to 95% leaving more fat in the bloodstream with negative cholesterol implications.

Crowley is all about dogma. Crowley goes nuts about the 6 day thing. Quoting page 52: "Why six days [a week of intense exercise]? ... Isn't anything better than nothing? No, you silly son of a .....! It's not better than nothing! It's six days because it has to be. Don't argue." Crowley spends a lot of time reading his heart rate monitor. And, since he does he also obliges you to do the same. He reads his heart rate monitor first thing in the morning and every time before, during, and after each of his workouts. He logs the results in a daily journal. For him, it is a mandatory way to measure the intensity of his workouts. Instead get your blood pressure every 6 months (at Walgreens). Your blood pressure is a far more important measure of your cardiovascular health than your pulse rate taken 5 times a day.

Both authors discount any merit of daily activities. Yet, daily activities decrease the amount of time sitting more than the intense sport regimen promoted by the authors. Also, they overlook the need to maintain flexibility. Dr. Lodge even conveys that Yoga is somewhat dangerous. With age we lose flexibility faster than strength. The lack of flexibility impairs balance and causes one to fall.

The authors recommend The Okinawa Program : How the World's Longest-Lived People Achieve Everlasting Health--And How You Can Too as a nutritional book. They miss the point. "The Okinawa Program" is also a far superior fitness book to theirs. Just browse through its chapter 6 titled `Lean and Fit.' You will get a totally different approach on how to age well. Japanese age well simply by remaining active (gardening, walking everywhere, etc...). They don't lift weights and don't do much endurance exercise. Instead, they practice a mellow activity: Tai Chi. The latter keeps their body well toned, balanced, and flexible with far less effort than the authors program.

Besides the Okinawa Program, I also recommend as another sensible alternative the CDC exercise guidelines. They amount to half as much as "Harry's Rules."
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37 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book for major lifestyle issues., May 19, 2007
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As a practicing physician, I strongly agree with the main points made in this book, namely, the need for frequent, aerobic excercise and the importance of eating the right foods. The strong points of this book are its humorous, easy-to-read style, and the emphasis on the fact that exercise and what we eat will not just make us feel better and look younger, but will really help us to live longer. The authors provide ample factual material to bolster their case, and then outline in detail what you have to do to get on board, in terms of the types and amount of excercise, and details about the right foods. I have read several books on health and aging, and this one is probably the best. I don't agree with the underlying world view of the authors, which is decidedly evolutionary, but the basic tenets of the book are certainly valid. The book should inspire you to take better care of your body and to live a longer, healthier, and happier life. There is plently of helpful information in this book to help anyone who is serious about doing this. We only have one body, so why not take care of it?
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Younger Next Year Gift Set for Men
Younger Next Year Gift Set for Men by Henry Lodge (Paperback - November 1, 2011)
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