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Your Skin and Mine: Revised Edition (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2) Paperback – August 30, 1991


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Frequently Bought Together

Your Skin and Mine: Revised Edition (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2) + A Drop of Blood (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2) + The Skeleton Inside You (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2)
Price for all three: $16.17

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 4
  • Lexile Measure: 560L (What's this?)
  • Series: Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2 (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Revised edition (August 30, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006445102X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064451024
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 8.8 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #564,708 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 2-- New illustrations and some careful text revision have given this 1965 basic introduction to the skin and its functions a much needed update. From the cover, which now features several children frolicking in the water rather than a rear view of three shirtless boys, to the highly appealing page layouts, this book proves far superior to its predecessor. A token girl has been added to the cast of main characters, although she is still outnumbered, three to one. The four take turns presenting different aspects of the skin, such as pigment and melanin, cuts and healing, fingerprints, and the sense of touch. Ink-and-watercolor illustrations are lively and vibrant, in direct contrast to the former black, white, and gold drawings. Changes in the text are minimal. More significant is the way in which it has been rearranged. Passages have been moved, regrouped, and elaborated upon, improving the flow of the story line. Page setup has gone from lines of sentences to paragraphs, resulting in a more readable style. The book should be given strong consideration as either a new or replacement copy.
- Denise L. Moll, Lone Pine School, Bloomfield Hills, MI
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Paul Showers wrote twenty books for the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series, including favorites such as What Happens to a Hamburger? and Where Does the Garbage Go? Mr. Showers worked on the Detroit Free Press, the New York Herald Tribune, and for thirty years, the Sunday New York Times.

Paul Showers has written more than twenty Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Books, including A Drop of Blood, illustrated by Don Madden, and Ears Are for Hearing, illustrated by Holly Keller. He lives in Palo Alto, CA.

Kathleen Kuchera lives in New York, NY. This is her first book for children.


More About the Author

Paul Showers wrote twenty books for the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series, including favorites such as What Happens to a Hamburger? and Where Does the Garbage Go? Mr. Showers worked on the Detroit Free Press, the New York Herald Tribune, and for thirty years, the Sunday New York Times.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Beth E. Hendrickson on September 6, 2008
Format: Paperback
My two girls loved this book. My 4-year-old really enjoyed looking at her skin under the magnifying glass.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By esmerelda on October 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
My five year old is intrigued by this book. Although the book suggests using a magnifying glass to do so, the observations it asks the reader to make can largely be done by the eye. I read it to him at night and, lying in bed, he and I look at our own skins and spot the similarities and differences in a gentle game of observation. It encourages the act of looking at the familiar with a new and curious eye. And the information it gives is solid and uncondescending.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By OUTFOX Prevention on July 31, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is good for an introduction into hygiene. The lesson on skin gives a good foundation on the body's defense of germs. Used correctly, students will be able to see how hygiene fits into the infection control equation, whether at home, school or play. When they know that the body is better when their defense is high, they can continually act responsibly to have better health. This book is best when paired with a hygiene lesson or other infection control activity (environmental cleaning, hand washing, etc.).

OUTFOX
OUTFOXprevention.com
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6 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Bonnie Sayers on November 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
Detailed explanations on the two layers of skin and feeling your skin. Your Skin and Mine centers around four kids, Mary, Henry, Mark and the other one is a boy who is telling the story and never offers his own name for the reader to learn. On page 24 they go into detail on melanin, which is grains of color to protect the body from the sun. He states that Mark's skin makes a lot of this while Henry and Mary's skin does not. There is no explanation on how he knows this or why it is different.

He has freckles on his skin and in the summer his skin does not make enough of melanin so he needs to rub on lotion. It is explained that darker skin can get burned by the sun so all should wear sunscreen. Mary and Henry have light brown skin and Mark has dark brown. This boy with freckles is the only one to have white skin.

This little boy and his sister helped their Mother clean the attic while wearing their bathing suits. This seemed funny to my son and he wondered why the boy was not wearing a shirt and the girl almost knocked over a lamp while chasing a spider with the broom. It must have been summer time since the siblings went outside to hose off the dirt from cleaning. He said his Mother thought this was easier than washing more dirty clothes. This is one idea I wish that was not in the book, as my son will want to do this as well. The last page has the kids cooling off with lemonade explaining how they were cool on the inside and out.

My son did not agree with the toenails and hair cuts not hurting, he did not learn why his fingers get wrinkled and funny looking after taking a bath. Just the past two days we had a new worker in our house and he was full of questions for her as her skin is darker than ours.
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