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You're Going to Love This Kid!: Teaching Children with Autism in the Inclusive Classroom Paperback – January 31, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-1557666147 ISBN-10: 1557666148 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 286 pages
  • Publisher: Brookes Publishing Company; 1 edition (January 31, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557666148
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557666147
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 7 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #577,229 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dr. Paula Kluth is a consultant, author, advocate, and independent scholar who works with teachers and families to provide inclusive opportunities for students with disabilities and to create more responsive and engaging schooling experiences for all learners. Her research and professional interests include differentiating instruction, and supporting students with autism and significant disabilities in inclusive classrooms.

Paula is a former special educator who has served as a classroom teacher, consulting teacher, and inclusion facilitator. She works with teachers in K-12 schools, pre-schools, and early intervention programs. She also regularly works with family organizations and disability-rights and advocacy groups.

She is the author of "You're Going to Love This Kid": Teaching Students with Autism in the Inclusive Classroom ; the lead editor of Access to Academics: Critical Approaches to Inclusive Curriculum, Instruction, and Policy, and the co-author of several other books including A Land We Can Share: The Literate Lives of Students with Autism; Joyful Learning: Active and Collaborative Structures for the Inclusive Classroom; You're Welcome: 30 Innovative Ideas for Inclusive Schools, Just Give Him the Whale: 20 Ways to Support & Honor the Interests of Students with Autism; and A is for All Aboard.


Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 20 customer reviews
This book is simply written and easy to read.
Cheri
I couldn't believe all the information, strategies and inspirational stories that where sitting in this wonderful book just waiting for me to read!
K. Philbin
I recommend this book to parents who have been told by administration, " We don't do inclusion here"!
M. Manternach

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A. Woods on September 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
My son is in preschool and has autism. This book is extremely helpful in giving you an overview of inclusion. It covers the law quickly but thoroughly in the beginning so you know what your rights are as a parent. It also talks a great deal about the benefits of inclusion not just to your special needs child but also to the other students. It gives you ideas on how to think "outside of the box" in teaching your child.

My only reason for giving it 4 stars rather than 5 is that in some cases, your child can get a better education by not doing inclusion and this is really not covered in the book. I think that my current situation is a good example of this. I am currently living in an OK school district but their is an autism teacher who is OUTSTANDING! I would be foolish not to take advantage of this teacher. My son still has some inclusion but not over 50%. Most importantly, the amount of inclusion is constantly discussed between the teacher and myself. This book proves to me that by law, I could fight and win to get more inclusion for my son. However, that doesn't mean that it is best for him.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By BeatleBangs1964 TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
Ms. Kluth's stellar work on including students with autism is a gem no educator should be without. I like the way she breaks down behaviors; describes possible triggers and offers reasonable, practical approaches to responding to socially unacceptable behaviors.

This is an extraordinary work that deserves a place of honor among professionals. I like the way she discusses other conditions and ways to provide accessibility.

The only thing I admit I didn't like was the word perseverate. That is a highly charged and extremely damaging/judgmental word that many people find offensive. While many professionals and other "neurotypical" people use it as a short hand or descriptor, it is still a very negative, stigmatizing word.

One thing that is so readily apparent about autism is that it is chiefly a sensory condition. Autism is a neurobiological condition that affects sensory processing and in some cases sensory integration; in very rare instances "linked" senses or synesthesia, i.e. "seeing music," "tasting words" and "hearing colors." Since autism is so plainly rooted in the senses and expressed in sensory terms, it is patently ridiculous to wonder if people with autism feel things. I like the way Ms. Kluth debunks a lot of misperceptions about autism and recognizes the fact that autism is a spectrum condition that varies among individuals.

I give this book an A+!
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By L. Kokes on December 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
Reviewed book given to me by a neighbor and parent of a child with autism. He had heard Ms. Kluth's lecture and purchased many copies to give to teaching professionals.
This book could be called a working manual for teachers who must discover how to reach a child with autism. There is more than one map to the process, and Ms. Kluth has cheerfully and whole-heartedly charted them out! In opening chapters, definitions of what it means to have autism, inclusion schooling explanations and required assessments are described, but quotes from people with autism are sprinkled around-giving the disability the human face it needs. My favorite paragraph, pulled from a web site created by folks with Asperger's:
Neurotypical syndrome is a neurobiological disorder characterized by preoccupation with social concerns, delusions of superiority, and obsession with conformity. Neurotypical individuals often assume that their experience of the world is either the only one, or the only correct one. NTs find it difficult to be alone. NTs are often intolerant of seemingly minor differences in others. When in groups NTs are socially and behaviorally rigid and frequently insist on the performance of dysfunctional, destructive, and even impossible rituals as a way of maintaining group identity. NTs find it difficult to communicate with persons on the autistic spectrum. NT is believed to be genetic in origin. Autopsies have shown the brain of the Neurotypical is typically smaller than that of an autistic individual and may have overdeveloped areas related to social behavior.
Even though I am "neurotypical" I understand this point of view! Ms. Kluth encourages teachers to see. "Not seeing is not a positive response to difference.
Read more ›
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By M. Manternach on September 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
This was a wonderful book! As a parent of a child with autism, I found so many practical ways to help his classroom teacher adapt her curriculum to meet my son's needs and keep him involved in the class. I recommend this book to parents who have been told by administration, " We don't do inclusion here"! This is proof that you can do it and do it well. I had the pleasure of hearing Dr. Kluth speak and her enthusiaam for helping our kids is infectious! If you get the chance, don't miss her for the world! Definitely one of the best workshops I have ever attended! She not only gives you ideas, she has you role play them so you can see them in practical use!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book was really helpful to me as a high school teacher- there are many books on autism but nothing on mainstreaming. My whole team has been able to use it.
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