When You're Strange (Songs From The Motion Picture)

April 2, 2010 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
0:18
2
0:17
3
3:01
4
0:07
5
4:47
6
0:05
7
2:57
8
0:13
9
4:25
10
0:06
11
12:26
12
0:44
13
2:11
14
0:07
15
2:10
16
0:11
17
3:31
18
0:16
19
0:12
20
2:56
21
0:09
22
0:12
23
11:25
24
0:26
25
7:47
26
0:10
27
4:29
28
0:15
29
6:54
30
0:11
31
2:38
32
0:24
33
3:18


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 2, 2010
  • Release Date: April 2, 2010
  • Label: Rhino/Elektra
  • Copyright: 2010 Rhino Entertainment Company, a Warner Music Group Company.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:19:18
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003EM54IE
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #99,937 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Great combo of poetry and music.
R. Honaker
This isn't a CD that you will want to hear over and over.
Gary T.
I have em' all but this one confuses me.
B. G Hutchings

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Robert Blake on April 22, 2010
Format: Audio CD
The Doors have spent years finding new ways to re-package and re-sell the same basic songs from their six studio albums. Now they have a new excuse for yet another release, a documentary about the history of the band which of course opens the door for a "soundtrack."

The album for "When You're Strange" is basically the same recordings a Doors fanatic or casual classic rock listener probably already has in earlier releases, such as the much superior "The Very Best Of The Doors" and of course, the albums themselves. For die hard members of the Jim Morrison cult the only noteworthy new material here are the poetry readings by actor Johnny Depp (who narrates the film), most of them only last a few seconds, but does that matter to Morrison's disciples? It is a shame though, how short the poetry tracks are, because Depp's voice adds a nice, dark atmosphere to the words, like a fellow literary rebel reciting strange visions and ideas.

The other "new" material here are "live tracks" basically lifted from TV performances such as the notorious "Light My Fire" performance from the Ed Sullivan Show and a scorching "When The Music's Over" from European TV. But the quality of these tracks is so scratchy and fuzzy that you're better off with the actual performance footage found in Doors DVD releases which have much cleaner audio. The Doors fanatic will no doubt want to get them just for the sake of having them but the casual listener will find little reason for adding the recordings to their iPods. The same goes for the "interview clips" featuring the band, short clips which, again, are simply lifted from video sources most fans purchased long ago.

The music of The Doors is of course classic, powerful and timeless.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jym Cherry on April 6, 2010
Format: Audio CD
"When You're Strange: Songs From The Motion Picture" is a mixture of readings of Jim Morrison's poems and non-sequiturs, interviews from all the members of The Doors, and the music of The Doors. At first a CD which incorporates the poetry of Jim Morrison and the music of The Doors may seem like a sequel to "An American Prayer," but the soundtrack to "When You're Strange" is quite unlike anything The Doors have released before.

This soundtrack doesn't rely on the usual chronological placement of songs or necessarily including all "the hits," but aims more for giving the listener a sense of what The Doors were about, a fusion and interweaving of poetry with the music. Morrison's poems segue very smoothly into the songs. The poems don't seem to have been picked to add any context to the songs, or compliment the songs, or even the reverse, the songs adding context to the poems, but they seem to naturally fit together. They may have been the cement between Morrison and the other Doors. Morrison`s poetry and the music of The Doors has always seemed to fit together as if they were meant to be together. There's a couple clips of interviews where the band members speak for themselves, but it follows the film's agenda of using only period clips and quotes from the band.

The soundtrack includes the classic album versions of the songs such as "Moonlight Drive," "Hello, I Love You," "Soul Kitchen". The live performances include, "Light My Fire" from The Ed Sullivan show where Morrison famously refused to leave out the word `higher` as requested by the censors, "When The Music's Over" from the Danish television broadcast, and "Break On Through" from the Isle of Wight.

The one misstep on the soundtrack is the inclusion of Johnny Depp reading Jim Morrison's poetry.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gary T. on April 14, 2010
Format: Audio CD
This isn't a CD that you will want to hear over and over. The sound quality is not as good as other Doors remasters and what's worse, having Johnny Depp recite Jim Morrison's poetry was a mistake. Depp's voice is too soft and it doesn't project the wild, dynamic spirit of Jim Morrison. I did enjoy the live version of "Break On Through (To The Other Side)" that was included on this CD. Your money would be better spent on the Doors studio albums or the many Live CDs. I've always believed that the Doors were one of the greatest American bands but this CD feels like somewhat of a ripoff. This type of fluff is definitely not what the Doors were about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By B. G Hutchings on April 7, 2010
Format: Audio CD
I have been an avid doors fan since my early teens (now in my mid-40s). Over the years, I have purchased just about everthing Doors that I could get my hands on (all official Electra releases, bootlegs, VHS/DVDs, the Bright Midnight releases (including the much-maligned Matrix release) and the innumerable 'Best Of' releases. I have em' all but this one confuses me. Don't get me wrong, I can't wait to see the movie and will be purchasing the DVD when it is released (hopefully with some bonus material) but this soundtrack escapes me. What we have here is YET another sampling of studio cuts that we all have heard, a couple live cuts that most (even casual) fans have seen/heard, and Johnny Depp reading Morrison poetry that is easily available from the man himself on American Prayer. So what is the point in this release? Who is it for? Can anyone tell me? Because I just don't get it...
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?