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Thus Spoke Zarathustra (A Modernized Translation with a New Introduction and Biography) [Kindle Edition]

Friedrich Nietzsche , Bill Chapko , Thomas Common
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $5.00
Kindle Price: $0.99
You Save: $4.01 (80%)

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Book Description

Although this edition of "Thus Spoke Zarathustra" is based on Thomas Common's 1909 translation, the text has been extensively modernized. Words such as "fain, hitherto, thee, wouldst, therefrom, nigh, ye and forsooth", have been replaced with present-day English equivalents.

Unique Features of this Special Kindle Edition:
An Original Essay on Nietzsche's Fundamental Idea of Eternal Recurrence
A New Introduction to Nietzsche's Life and Writings by the Editor
An New Extensive Timeline Biography
A Section with Nietzsche's Comments on Each of his Books.
Selected Excerpts from His Other Works

"Thus Spoke Zarathustra" is also included in the Kindle Book "Nietzsche's Best 8 Books" (with only a slightly higher price), which contains the unabridged texts of:
1.The Gay Science
2.Ecce Homo
3.Thus Spoke Zarathustra
4.The Dawn
5.Twilight of the Idols
6.The Antichrist
7.Beyond Good and Evil
8.On the Genealogy of Morals

"Nietzsche's Best 8 Books" is a searchable ebook and allows following the many themes and subjects that Nietzsche came back to throughout his books.

From the Introduction by the Editor:
"University philosophers, especially from America and England, have always been bewildered and irritated by Nietzsche. He doesn't fit anywhere. His influence has been outside university culture - among artists, dancers, poets, writers, novelists, psychologists, playwrights. Some of the most famous who publicly acknowledged being strongly influenced by Nietzsche were Picasso, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, William Butler Yeats, Rainer Rilke, Allen Ginsberg, Khalil Gibran, Martin Buber, H.L. Mencken, Emma Goldman, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Thomas Mann, Hermann Hesse, Jack London, Franz Kafka, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Karl Jaspers, Alfred Adler, Fritz Perls, Eugene O'Neill and George Bernard Shaw. . . . Explore Nietzsche yourself. He mostly wrote directly and clearly, without scholarly jargon. See if he brings out the artist or psychologist or dancer in you."


Editorial Reviews

Review

, also translated as Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Treatise by Friedrich Nietzsche, written in four parts and published in German between 1883 and 1885 as Also sprach Zarathustra. The work is incomplete, but it is the first thorough statement of Nietzsche's mature philosophy and the masterpiece of his career. It received little attention during his lifetime but its influence since his death has been considerable, in the arts as well as philosophy. Written in the form of a prose narrative, Thus Spake Zarathustra offers the philosophy of its author through the voice of Zarathustra (based on the Persian prophet Zoroaster) who, after years of meditation, has come down from a mountain to offer his wisdom to the world. It is this work in which Nietzsche made his famous (and much misconstrued) statement that "God is dead" and in which he presented some of the most influential and well-known (and likewise misunderstood) ideas of his philosophy, including those of the Ubermensch ("overman" or "superman") and the "will to power." Though this is essentially a work of philosophy, it is also a masterpiece of literature. The book is a combination of prose and poetry, including epigrams, dithyrambs, and parodies as well as sections of pure poetry. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature

Language Notes

Text: English
Original Language: German

Product Details


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
129 of 133 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Talk about translations! May 8, 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I only want to say one thing here, and I say it primarily because I already love this work. This is the translation to buy. Everyone seems to adore Kaufmann, but the truth is he's much more obtuse and difficult to read (and I don't believe it's necessary, as some may say). Hollingdale gets it right. I'll defend myself with one example from a class I took, where Kaufmann's translation was the required text. I had read both translations (cover-to-cover), and sold my copy of Kaufmann's translation, keeping only my Hollingdale. So, needless to say, I wasn't about to buy Kaufmann again, and went to class with Hollingdale. Slowly, but surely, as the other students read bits of the translation I had, or heard when I spoke pieces aloud, they overwhelmingly agreed with me: Hollingdale is simply more clear, more beautiful, more powerful (less academic, shall we say, which is pure Nietzsche). Ok, over and out, enjoy.
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183 of 198 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Review for the non-philosopher November 4, 2000
Format:Paperback
There seem to be plenty of reviews debating the philosophical principles of Nietszche and the statements he makes, so, for the non-philosophy students present (i.e. ME) I'll rate it for the layman.
`TSZ' is very longwinded, and as the introduction states, filled with `excess', but that does not make it a bad book. Every sentence is imbued with its own iconic poetry, and, philosophy aside, the metaphors and similes alone make this book worth reading. It is clear that Nietszche, or perhaps his translator, had a mind better suited to creative expression than most philosophers, or indeed today's authors, and it is in this that lies the book's real strength. Through its use of imagery it not only makes an interesting, inspirational, conjectural read (apart from a few really boring parts that seemed written only to slow down the pace), it makes its message easy to understand and backs it up with surrealistic examples. Whereas sometimes in philosophy, the use of allegory can confuse the issue (More's `Utopia' - mockery of idealism, framework for perfect society, or rambling tale?), in `Zarathustra' the reader, no matter whether they are new to the field or not, cannot fail to discern the message that Man is not a goal but a bridge, a rope over an abyss. As philosophy, and as literature, it succeeds in conveying its point, setting up a platform for discussion or merely to digest individually. Admittedly, some refuse to read Nietszche because of his view of women (`shallow waters'), and because of how his ideas for the Superman allegedly inspired Hitler's Aryan vision for the world, but such people deprive themselves of an interesting viewpoint that defines the meaning of life in human rather than spiritual terms.
One potential problem for the newcomer to philosophy is the storyline.
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118 of 139 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most important books of the last century October 26, 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Friedrich Nietzsche was a "failure" in his time. He was branded a nihilist and heretic and his works dismissed as the ramblings of a mad man. After the Great War many philosophers such as Heidegger resurected the works of Nietzsche and Kierkegaard (to name a few) and studied them with greater admiration. We should be thankful that the works of such an imaginative genius such as Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was called into the spotlight. Nietzsche constructed one of the most original and radical philosophies in all its history, as challenging to everyday life as Karl Marx. His ideas still send shockwaves through the Christian community because so much of what he says is blatantly obvious and true. Most people dismiss Nietzsche's slogan that "God is dead", but in this work Nietzsche truly refines this statement and incorporates brilliant ideas about living for the Earth, striving to become Der Ubermensch and the path to release from Christianities chains. The main theme of this book is that which Nietzshce will probably be best remembered for, but for all the wrong reasons. Nietzsche's vision of the "Superman" (der Ubermensch) was an idea that his sister, in co-operation with Hitler, twisted to begin the Nazi experiments for the Superrace. The Superman is at the centre of this book and Nietzsche gives a perfect description of his vision and furthermore what it will incorporate and help to abolish. It soon becomes clear that Nietzsche's Superman is far different from Hitler's, furthermore because it is not as brutal and inhumane and lastly because it centres around completely different principals: HItler wanted a physical Superman, but Nietzsche's Superman would be MENTALLY strong rather than purely physically. Read more ›
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38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tale of an Ubermensch September 30, 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra is probably his most famous work as well as being the work least popular among readers. This is probably partially because it is written in fictional form. Zarathustra is well designed to frustrate twentieth century philosophy of the analytic tradition, which seeks conceptual clarity at the expense of rhetorical form, indeed often insisting on the separation between a concept and the vehicle of its expression. Moreover, the utilization of the work by the Nazi war effort did little to improve the books reception in the Anglo-American world.
The book is philosophically interesting, in part because it does employ literary tropes and genres to philosophical effect. Zarathustra makes frequent use of parody, particularly of the Platonic dialogues and the New Testament. This strategy immediately places Zarathustra on a par with Socrates and Christ--and as a clear alternative to them. The erudite allusions to works spanning the Western philosophical and literary traditions also play a philosophical role, for they both reveal Nietzsche's construct of the tradition he inherited and flag points at which he views it as problematic.
Much of the book consists of Zarathustra's speeches on philosophical themes. These often obscure the plotline of the book. The book does involve a plot, however, which includes sections in which Zarathustra is "off-stage," in private reflection, and some in which he seems extremely distressed about the way his teaching and his life are going. Zarathustra attempts to instruct the crowds and the occasional higher man that he encounters in the book; but his most important teaching is his education of the reader, accomplished through demonstrative means. Zarathustra teaches by showing.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Difficult read but worth the time and effort.
Published 4 days ago by Adam Harrison
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
all items to my liking
Published 11 days ago by Trevor Hagley
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
good book
Published 15 days ago by P. Chen
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars
Really hated all the old English words. They distract from comprehension.
Published 1 month ago by Philip
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most challenging works I have ever read
Thus Spoke Zarathustra (originally Also Sprach Zarathustra) is considered by some (myself included) to have been the crowning work of the nineteenth century German philosopher... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Kurt A. Johnson
5.0 out of 5 stars First read
I enjoyed this book very much. There is much in it that requires reflection an I will reread it at some point.
Published 4 months ago by JamesAbel
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Good reading !
Published 4 months ago by Shane
3.0 out of 5 stars haven't read yet
I got a whole bunch of free books to download. Haven't read it yet. Doesn't appear to be any issues with downloading.
Published 8 months ago by chris pederson
5.0 out of 5 stars good
From the content, book condition to delivery time, item price, I feel that all as good as or even better than i expected
Published 9 months ago by Jack Chang
4.0 out of 5 stars A good Nietzche introductory book
I liked this book. It was published in 1883, 3 years before Beyond Good and Evil. I read Beyond Good and Evil first, and it might have skewed my review. Read more
Published 9 months ago by Bugs
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Translator
i have no idea who the translator might be, and i agree ... no one should buy any english-version Nietzschean work without first checking out the translator. could be Danto for all i know ;)
Mar 9, 2010 by Jana |  See all 5 posts
So whose translation is this anyway?? Be the first to reply
A must-read for Nietzscheans: "The Epic of Arya: In Search of the Sacred... Be the first to reply
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