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Zemlinsky: Die Seejungfrau (The Mermaid) / Psalms 13 & 23

Alexander Zemlinsky , Riccardo Chailly , Kammerchor Ernst Senff Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)


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MP3 Music, 5 Songs, 2010 $9.49  
Audio CD, 1997 --  

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View the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Die Seejungfrau - 1. Sehr Mässig BewegtRadio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin15:20Album Only
listen  2. Die Seejungfrau - 2. Sehr Bewegt, RauchendRadio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin12:18Album Only
listen  3. Die Seejungfrau - 3. Sehr Gedehnt, Mit Schmerzvollem AusdruckRadio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin12:31Album Only
listen  4. Zemlinsky: Psalm 13, Op.24Ernst Senff Chamber Choir13:43Album Only
listen  5. Zemlinsky: Psalm 23, Op.14Ernst Senff Chamber Choir10:56Album Only


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RICCARDO CHAILLY – BIOGRAPHY
“Since its founding more than 250 years ago . . . the Gewandhaus Orchestra has gone through 18 music directors, including Mendelssohn, and many changes. The new dyna-mism that this eminent orchestra displayed . . . is surely attributable to its 19th music director, the Italian conductor Riccardo Chailly. After Tuesday night’s concert ended with ... Read more in Amazon's Riccardo Chailly Store

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Product Details

  • Performer: Kammerchor Ernst Senff
  • Conductor: Riccardo Chailly
  • Composer: Alexander Zemlinsky
  • Audio CD (November 11, 1997)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: London / Decca
  • ASIN: B0000042D7
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #415,873 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
The recent gorgeous recording of his Lyrische Symphonie [1923] with Matthias Goerne, Christine Schaefer, conducted by Christoph Eschenbach (ZEMLINSKY: Lyric Symphony op. 18) is continuing proof of that fact, I believe.
But about ten years earlier, Riccardo Chailly (like James Conlon, Antony Beaumont and Gerd Albrecht, an avid advocate of Zemlinsky's art) set out on a series of recordings of Zemlinsky's masterworks, like his orchestral fantasy/symphonic poem Die Seejungfrau (of around 1900), which we are reviewing here. While not as freely polychromatic and dense as his later Lyrische Symphony, and while not as grand in scope (it is over half an hour long), this Die Seejungfrau is in itself an engaging piece of evocative music. Here it is given a dramatic reading by Riccardo Chailly conducting the Radio-Symphonie-Orchester (now Deutsche Symphonie-Orchester) Berlin, with an almost psychologic intensity, which also characterizes his cycle of Mahler symphonies he recorded with (mainly) the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.
Although Die Seejungfrau was written after the story by Hans Christian Andersen, and although Alexander Zemlinsky himself had devised some kind of 'program', the music doesn't follow the narrative explicitly, as it was Zemlinsky's (and Schoenberg's) wish to write music which transcended the distinction between 'absolute' and 'programme' music.
The music for Die Seejungfrau begins mysteriously, with low brass and slowly toiling low harp-strings, soon covered by rustlings of high harp and flute, evoking a sense of looking up, from the depths of the sea bed towards the light of the bright sun, reflected through the waves far away up above ...
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