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Zen Catholicism Paperback – March 1, 1994


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: The Crossroad Publishing Company (March 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0824514254
  • ISBN-13: 978-0824514259
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #290,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Kim Boykin on February 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is a fairly dense but well written exploration of how Zen might help Catholics "to realize more fully their own spiritual inheritance." Graham's take on Zen in relation to Catholicism is theologically astute and experientially grounded.

Graham, who was a Benedictine monk, notes that he is not inviting readers "to embark on a daring theological adventure" (the book received an ecclesiastical imprimatur). Rather, he is inviting readers "to look into [their] own nature and that of the Church" and to consider Graham's suggestion that, at their existential depths, Zen and Catholicism share the same basic message.

This book was first published in 1963, but I think it's still one of the best books relating Buddhism and Christianity.

Also recommended: Ruben Habito's "Living Zen, Loving God."
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40 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is a book that provides fertile ground for further writing and reflection. While the language is rather dry, if given the time it really deserves, each few pages will leave you torn between continuing your reading or running out to plant yourself under a tree to sit and work out the cramps in your brain. Rather than offering an idea of some unnatural marriage of Buddhism and Catholicism, Father Aelred concerns himself only with Zen practice and what the Zen sages have to teach us(meaning Westerners) in regard to incessant prayer and what the Psalmist meant in writing "Be still and know that I am God". This is a book that begs for further dialogue within the Church as Father Aelred seems to be hot on the trail of how express the way in which one can be in the world but not of it. It's sort of a scholarly Thomas Merton type of book.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By C. Conlee on November 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
Some people are born with faith and never lose it; some are born with it and lose it; others stray from God, only to find Him later by circuitous paths.
I was one of these, and "Zen Catholicism" represents a sort-of bridge between my two historical lines of thought: belief in Christ and belief in philosophy-atheism.
Not to say "Zen Catholicism" leans more towards the latter strain of thought; in fact, just the opposite: this book is quite conservative--without being close-minded--and was given an IMPRIMATUR in 1963 by Archbishop Francis Cardinal Spellman.
Nevertheless, this book blends two beautiful traditions in a way in which Catholics of all dispositions can appreciate. Treated as a philosophy Zen is quite beautiful: seeing things just as they are being an example.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mike LaBelle on May 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I was very pleased to find an original 1963 edition of this book for less than half the price that the now out of print 1990's paperback is going for. This is a very important book from a writer who pre-dates Merton in the whole east/west dialogue thing. And in a true sign of the times it has the official Catholic Imprimatur and Nihil Obstat. Something that the paperback reissue did not get. But as the Catholic Church lost it's way in 1980's, this is not surprising. I still have hope that it will returned to the big heartedness that is exemplified in Zen Catholicism.
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