Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $4.46 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Solid used copy with visible wear. FREE SHIPPING w/AMAZON PRIME!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Zen Keys: A Guide to Zen Practice Paperback – December 1, 1994


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.49
$5.07 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Zen Keys: A Guide to Zen Practice + The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation + What the Buddha Taught: Revised and Expanded Edition with Texts from Suttas and Dhammapada
Price for all three: $29.15

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 198 pages
  • Publisher: Harmony; Reissue edition (December 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385475616
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385475617
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #201,056 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Thich explains in simple terms many of the more difficult theories and philosophies of Zen Buddhism in this 1974 title. The book also includes the first English translation of the writings of 13th-century Vietnamese Zen master Tran Thai Tong.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Thich Nhat Hanh is a Vietnamese monk, a renowned Zen master, a poet, and a peace activist. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize by Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1967, and is the author of many books, including the best-selling The Miracle of Mindfulness.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
16
4 star
5
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 23 customer reviews
I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in Zen, Buddhism, or 'enlightenment'.
Katie
This book restores us to such mindfulness, not only in meditation but within every mundane and physical action, including eating.
C. Scanlon
I have a great respect for Thich Nhat Hanh and the many works that he has done in his years with us.
Giddy Boy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Swing King on January 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
"To reach truth is not to accumulate knowledge, but to awaken to the heart of reality." So starts a random chapter in Thich Nhat Hanh's now quite famous book ZEN KEYS. This book is FILLED to the brim with metaphors, allegories, and meditational suggestions Thich provides us with. He references Dogen a few times, using quotes of the old Master. Also interesting is Thich's use of some koans in the end of this work, something he is not "well known for" in many of his works. He provides us with 43 of them to be precise, with commentary following each one. It's just interesting because through the years Thay has seemed to lay off koan work some, yet this is a unique work in that he uses them.
Simply put, this book will live up to your expectations if you read it through and through. Too often we place a book down during a "slow part", never reading it's entirety. The most important facet of reading into Zen for me these days is approaching the texts with a "I don't know it all" mindset. A challenge, to say the least. After practicing and reading with teacher after teacher, group after group, sometimes you get the feeling you know something "special" about the Dharma. When we get this attitude, no book, no zazen, and no teacher can penetrate our ego. It is only when we become babies again that we can allow the light of truth to come back in. Get Thich's book, it's truly wonderful!
Enjoy:)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By "eibhinn" on May 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
Thich Nhat Hahn uses his personal and direct writing style to do the impossible --- teach the basics of Zen to a western audience. This book is back in print after being unavailable for about twenty-five years. Consider yourself lucky. It is a very effective introduction to Zen, it doesn't dwell on the details and the author doesn't attempt to be mystical and astound you with how enlightened and "zen-er than you" he is. Thich Nhat Hahn tell it like it is. He is a very talented and gentle teacher and I would recommend this book to anyone interested in Zen.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
57 of 64 people found the following review helpful By edward j. santella on February 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
Hardly a day goes by without a new Thich Nhat Hanh book - which is a very good thing. A Buddhist monk who fled the American War in Vietnam, Thich Nhat Hanh leads a world-wide community centered at Plum Village in south-west France. A critic and target of both the Communist regime and the U.S. backed South, he became well-known in America and a friend of Martin Luther King and Daniel Berrigan. Just as Chinese political oppression forced Tibetan Buddhists onto the world stage, Thich Nhat Hanh's exile allowed the West to come to know Zen better.
"Zen Keys" is one of his earlier books and, unlike many others, is not a meditation text. "Zen Keys" is a serious introduction to the history and practice of Zen from the Buddha to the present. And Zen is practice. Unlike Western religions, Zen does not rely on dogma. Zen and Buddhism are methods of enlightenment, coming to know the real world. We have learned to "see" they world through reason and emotions. Reason and emotions are not bad; they are insufficient to come to know the world. "Reality, he writes, "is only reality when it is not grasped conceptually." (112)
Zen is the practice through which we come to know the world. Using some of Thich Nhat Hanh's books and other works, I have tried meditation. No, I have not attained enlightenment, but I have discovered all too many ways in which I have failed to see reality. Have I come to be a better human being because of "practice"? You'll have to ask someone else. And, yes, it is disconcerting - but so freeing - to realize that my idea of myself is a construct I've assembled over time and not who I am.
As Thich Nhat Hanh points out, Zen and Buddhism do not lead to "navel-gazing".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Giddy Boy on May 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have a great respect for Thich Nhat Hanh and the many works that he has done in his years with us. This book is another example of his striving to present the joys of Zen to the western world. His poetry, charity, and daily life reflect a pattern of mindfulness that many will never experience. I fear though, as he states, that the Western world will not be able to fully grasp Oriental Zen practice, and a western form of it has arisen. I appreciate the book's simplicity, and honesty. May peace be with you today...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ivan Alfredo on September 28, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book as a source of inspiration for my practice, however it turned out to be a summary of the Zen tradition from Vietnam. By all means it is a good book, just did not fit the current needs of my practice. Nevertheless, the 43 koans (translated to english for the first time by Thay) are a true piece of art, which make this book a good addition to any Zen practitioner's library.

I feel the book "Meet the Real Dragon" by Gudo Wafu Nishijima goes deeper into the essence of Zen practice, and therefore into the essence of life itself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By eric langley on March 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
i had always had a semi-interest in buddhism, derived from ecstatic readings of 'dharma bums' by jack kerouac (another must-have), but disappointed as i couldnt find 'big sur' at the bookstore a month ago, i chanced upon the religion section, and zen keys shone out on the shelf, i picked it up, read a page of thich nhat hanh's contemplative prose, and immmediately bought and took it home devouring it in my bedroom for hours. Nhat Hanhs compassionate and understanding approach to Zen Buddhism makes learning about it easy, and also very rewarding. his take, which is no ones take at all but rather the truth, about zen makes for free-minded thinking thru the eight negations, mindfullness of everyday life, and the wisdom of the zen masters in the kung-ans at the end of the book. i cannot help but be forever changed by this simplistic yet beautiful overlay of Zen Buddhism. anyone, everyone, Americans and materialism and all, MUST read this, dont lose your life in forgetfullness and apathy and be lost in worldly pursuit, be a monk.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews