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Zero Girl Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Wildstorm (November 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563898519
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563898518
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 6.6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,437,890 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Zack Davisson HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
"Zero Girl" is a great, quirky series. Sam Keith is a man with insight into the weird, with an emphasis on the private worlds of outcast girls.
The story of "Zero Girl" is a dream fantasy, where Circles are locked in a war with Squares. Our hero is at the center of this war. Circles protect her. Squares attack her. Her feet get wet. Somewhere locked inside this war are half-faded memories trying to get out.
An off kilter romance appears in the form of a high school girl in love with her school councilor. This is not a bad thing, in context of the story.
The art, of course, is Sam Keith's usual brand of goodness. He takes all of these strange story elements and welds them into a cohesive story by the force of his art.
And, as a topper, "Zero Girl" has an introduction by Alan Moore praising it. If you don't take my word for it, take Alan's. "Zero Girl" is great comics.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on July 15, 2006
Format: Paperback
The pieces are familiar: a high school girl dealing with the ultimate family dysfunction, high school bullies, and high school crushes. The crush-ee, in this case, is a high school guidance counselor achingly aware that Amy Smootster isn't a little girl any more - a fact that Amy is equally aware of, and brings clearly to his attention. But she has real problems at home, such as it is, the kind that a counselor is supposed to involve himself in.

But there's something very special about Amy, more than the fact that wet puddles form under her shoes when embarassment becomes its worst (which it does often). And the high school bullies, even the thugs in that dark alley have something even darker behind them ...

It's more complex than Emily the Strange, and more for teens than for Emily's `tweens. The artwork is good, sometimes angular, and it does better with expression and narration than literal representation. Maybe not for everyone, but I'm coming back for more.

//wiredweird
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Format: Paperback
Sam Kieth has described himself as such in the past and I think Zero Girl is a fantastic example of this. When I think of Mainstream I think of typically shallow but fun reads and when I think of the alt or underground, I think of stuff that is a lot more confrontational.

Zero Girl is a bit in the middle. The graf art in the background even suggests that DC comics wouldn't let him put anything truly edgy or indie in the story. He was working within the rules of mainstream story telling.

That said, I think Zero Girl is a fantastic piece of fiction. A great example of "Mystic Punk" even if it doesn't fit all of the rules and I found the story very engaging.

Amy and Tim are people. They don't make the best choices and they can be a bit shallow but they feel real. They're sexually attracted to each other and (as is true for all people) that leads to them being romantically attached.

She's faced with very typical problems even if this is a supernatural horror. Which isn't common.

Sam Kieth's art is compelling, beautiful and strong. I can look at the pretty pictures all day long.

I also think that anybody who is into comics should study the use of a visual clue like the bloody coaster. This was brilliant and something that would not have worked in a prose story. A great example of what comics can do. Bravo Mr. Kieth!
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By "markorama" on January 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
Anyone at all familiar with Sam Kieth's previous work (The Maxx, or his Marvel work) already knows what they're getting into when they pick this up. For the uninitiated, here's what you'll find:
1) a unique story...Kieth never tells a "standard" tale, and Zero Girl is certainly no exception. Circles good, squares bad. Foot sweat. Trust me, it all makes sense.
2) Great art. Any excuse to view Kieth art is worth the price. His characters look like no one else's. His style cannot be duplicated easily, and those that try fail horribly. Think Frazetta on acid for a general idea.
Zero Girl is a good read and was hailed as one of the best of 2001 by many in the industry. There's a reason. READ IT!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Oecobius on July 31, 2011
Format: Paperback
While the artwork in this comic is excellent, the writing is nothing short of frustrating. The story's circle-vs-square mysticism is entertaining, but the two central characters sorely lack engaging qualities. Most of the comic barrages us with Amy's angst and whining about how mean old society won't accept her and Tim's relationship. The problem here is that said relationship has no firm basis and can be summed up thus: narcissistic Amy wants to have sex with Tim (she is not interested in Tim as a person, only as a sex partner), and Tim, a totally bland character whose sole trait is being wishy-washy, is mildly interested in Amy's strange situation while also being turned on by her being a slut. There is nothing to make us care about the supposed protagonists (Amy is introduced as being bullied, but this is a cheap ploy to engage some emotion).
Since the events remain unexplained by the end, the characters are the only ones holding the story together, and so the story itself falls flat. The most interesting character is the antagonist, who explores the ongoing mysticism and actually does something dynamic for the plot (instead of bumbling around and whining). She becomes intent on killing Amy; we are given no firm evidence that this would be a bad thing, but Kieth makes Amy emerge a victorious "good guy" for reasons unknown.
The dialogue ranges from inane to absurdly-stilted & forced. There is an absence of sincerity or relatability. I could see the story appealing to angst-ridden 13-year-olds, but for anyone above that maturity range, the artwork is the sole rewarding aspect of the book. It's a shame such a talented artist was so incapable of creating characters of depth.
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