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Zero Hour: Crisis in Time Paperback – August 23, 1994


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Product Details

  • Series: Zero Hour
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; 1St Edition edition (August 23, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563891840
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563891847
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 6.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #785,426 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Zero Hour came as quite a disappointment to me.
nonamesteaks
Somewhere in the attempt to put in as many characters as possible, the story ends up a bit unfocused.
Steve Fuson
Hal Jordan/ Parallax's role is short, occuring mostly at the end.
A. Hammour

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Erik M. Held on October 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
With all the hooplah around DC Comics right now - they are bringing all their DC Universe titles together for the "Infinite Crisis" crossover that is supposed to change everything (!!) - I am surprised more attention isn't paid to this mid-90s event: Zero Hour: Crisis in Time.

Time was unravelling at both ends, heroes were dying, their efforts for naught against the onrushing entropy that consumed everything. But, as always, the late 20th Century heroes decide to take action to right this wrong, a wrong perpetrated by one of their own. The story was not too bloated (downright brisk, next to the sprawling crossovers today), moved like a good summer blockbuster movie should, and left a lasting mark on the DC Universe. That, and it boasted Dan Jurgens artwork, he also being an overlooked gem in the modern comic artwork field.

Based around the idea that Parallax (former Green Lantern/now hugely powerful Hal Jordan, then a bit nuts after seeing his home city wiped out and having assaulted and bested his former masters, the Guardians of the Galaxy) wishes to redo time to save all his friends and family - and those of his cohorts, Zero Hour follows several dozen heroes as they race to save time or die trying. Along the way, that latter part is certainly fulfilled, as numerous heroes - and some villains - fall to the entropy effect Parallax is unleashing on the timeline.

The original superteam, the JSA, bring the fight to Extant, a former hero-turned-megalomaniac who is aiding Parallax and reveling in the chaos unleashed. These geriatric heroes do not find an easy victory, with the whole team being changed forever.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Steve Fuson on July 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
After Crisis on Infinite Earths the history of the DC Universe had to be blended into one continuity, but not all of that history had been mapped out in advance and some of the continuity was a bit fuzzy. With Crisis almost a decade behind and hindsight being 20/20, Zero Hour was intended to tie up the few remaining continuity errors.

I originally read this story when it came out in monthly installments and I liked it. The events here bled into other books and all kinds of time anomalies occured, like the Superboy of appeared after the death of Superman running into the young Kal-El Superboy, and a Batgirl (Barbara Gordon) from a time period before she was paralyzed showed up and joined the fight.

The crossover tried to promote new characters like Damage and dealt with major shake-ups like what was happening with Guy Gardner, which is what a crossover should do. A regular Superman reader picks it up to see what happens to him and becomes interested in what's happening to Hawkman, so the reader starts buying Hawkman as well. Cross promotion of characters is the general idea here. But Guy Gardner is back to being a Green Lantern and Damage no longer has his own book, and a lot of the other things this crossover tries to promote are no longer relevant. In order to really enjoy this you would need to go and get the back issues, since most of what was happening at this time isn't collected in trades.

A personal critique is that the characters who seem important in the beginning aren't the ones who seem important in the end which is just poor storytelling. Somewhere in the attempt to put in as many characters as possible, the story ends up a bit unfocused.

But, as I said, I did enjoy it, and I still do.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. David Swan VINE VOICE on August 14, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Duuuude, welcome to the 90's where Superman has AWESOME long
hair, Guy Gardner is called WARRIOR!! and Rob Leifeld is sending shockwaves through the industry with his.... well... there was a reason I went the entire decade without purchasing a single comic book.

Here's a confession. I start my reviews well before I finish reading a book and my review for Zero Hour was shaping up to be pretty harsh. The first issue of Zero Hour is both the most poorly written and features the worst artwork. My experience with Zero Hour was similar to when I read "The Great Darkness Saga". At first I couldn't fathom why so many people considered it to be one of the all time great comic storylines and Paul Levitz writing was to put it politely, not good. By the end, however, I was a total convert. Zero Hour isn't as well regarded but it definitely improves as it progresses to an explosive and satisfying ending.

Warning, I make no attempt to avoid spoilers....
Zero Hour was shaping up to be yet ANOTHER story of the DC heroes teaming up to save the universe from being consumed. Nowadays it seems like the DC heroes are saving the universe about as often as I go in for a physical. One wonders why they're so affected at this point or feel such desperation since they do it all the time. The story felt like a watered down version of Crisis on Infinite Earths until the big reveal of the power behind Extant. I'd had knowledge of the events of Zero Hour but I'd forgotten that Hal Jordon, now self renamed as Parallax, was attempting to recreate the universe in order to "fix" it and restore Coast City. Long before Jordon stepped forward it dawned on me who the man in the shadows was but it still was a powerful moment.
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