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78 of 85 people found the following review helpful
on November 27, 2010
What a handy design! I'll order a pack in a few minutes.
Someone mentioned not finding the power-handling capability for these cords. The ad says they're 16-ga. AWG, which gives them about a 13-amp capability, which in turn means slightly more than 1500 watts. As someone else warned, it's possible to overload your power strip by adding a fistful of these and plugging in large loads. Check the total wattage of the items you plan to plug in.
Most wall-warts are fairly low-power, but add up the numbers. Volts X Amps = Watts, by the way, in case the wattage is not listed directly.
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87 of 96 people found the following review helpful
on December 30, 2010
I have some regular cord liberators that don't have the pass through, and I thought these would be even better. However, the way the cord is angled at the pass through often blocks an additional outlet, which defeats the purpose of a cord liberator. Using the passthrough bulks up the power strip too. For neatness and general practicality I'd recommemd the purchase of cord liberators without a pass through, just works better overall.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on May 14, 2009
These are high quality cords, very nice. The fact that each cord has a receptacle built into the back of the plug end, allows you to double the number of devices you can connect to your power strips. Just watch the total wattage of your devices. you don't want to overload the power strip.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on February 18, 2011
I've tried with two different power strips and you cannot put these in side by side..They are almost useless..
The angle of the cord and the size(just a tad too big..I can't even force it..on either power strip) make these near pointless..

Using the pass thru..Ive gained about two(2) outlets using 3(three) of these on a 8(eight) outlet power strip.

Get the other ones..Trust me..you'll be as frustrated as I am..no reason for this design..Just simply bad engineering..great concept..love the idea..it just doesn't work..THEY ARE A LITTLE TOO BIG..And I'm not one to shy away from forcing things a bit..but in this case that even ins't possible.

Not sure what the return policy is on this..I need to check with amazon
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on July 13, 2011
These are an excellent idea and I have used them well with wall-warts that block an adjacent power plug.

BUT - the complaints about them being a VERY tight fit on the socket that sits flush to the wall are correct. However the explanation WHY is very simple.

In order to test how tight that socket is without ruining any of my own cables, I plugged the cable into itself to form an "O". It was not tight at all so I looked closer at the male portion. The two flat prongs are identical - one side is not fatter than the other. With power plugs where one flat-prong is larger than the other, the fit will be very tight. To test this, I used a 2-prong power cable that has the connectors of different widths so I would have room to wiggle it out, whereas a 3-prong would not allow that. Sure enough, the 2-prong with different widths for proper orientation in a socket was a tight fit.

With 3-prongs, one flat-connector being wider than the other is out-of-date, since the grounding prong forces only 1 orientation in the socket. BUT - a lot of 3-prongs are built that way, so be aware.

I can still use 4 out of 5 with a 3-prong cable into the wall-flush socket without much difficulty. On the tightest one, I just plug something with a 2-prong cable into it so I can wiggle it out.

The connectors on the end of the tail have no problems at all.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on March 30, 2011
These would be a fantastic idea, however because the plugs are on a very sharp angle it gets into the way of other plugs on power bars or strips where the plugs are close together.

These are still useful if the outlets are an inch or more apart, but on side by side plugs on power bars they are useless.

They do work pretty good on my extension cable though as the plugs are vertical to each other instead of horizontal. And the cables themselves seem to be pretty heavy duty.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on February 28, 2011
Product is a great idea allowing a power strip to have double the number of connections as well as enabling bulky power adaptors to be connected without losing multiple sockets.
However, the socket directly above the plug is sooooo tight it is extremely difficult to get a plug inserted (All 5 cords had same issue). - Lost 2 eggs for this.
The socket at the end of the mini extension cord however was fine requiring only usual force to insert other plugs.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on April 15, 2011
These do the job, but lousy quality control by the manufacturer.

Each liberator has two sockets as described: a hard compound round plug with pass through socket and a corded socket with softer insulation, angled 45 degrees diagonally from the plug orientation. I expected 90 degrees sideways [but of course I hadn't read the post which describe the above].

Good: The corded socket works well in every one received, so connecting charger bricks, for example, is easier, and the angle worked with my powerstrip.

Bad: Only *2 of 5* of the pass through sockets accepted a plug without needing undue force to insert, and I needed tools to separate them afterward. I actually used a hammer for one, as I needed the extra socket.

I did wind up with more sockets than my powerstrip offered because of the pass-through sockets. But: even though I can usually put things back together - and I have plenty of tools to take things apart - even _I_ can't get plugs into *two of five* of the pass-through sockets without cutting them apart. They simply won't accept a plug - stunning. So, I paired items which go together [since they're so hard to get apart], for example: monitor+desktop, printer+scanner, bluetooth+cellphone chargers, etc.

But: 40% "significant defect" rate is not what I hoped for.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on February 26, 2011
While the extension part functions well, when I plugged a device into the piggy-back outlet it was held so tightly that the device broke when I tried to pull it out.
I couldn't return the things because I somehow misplaced one; so I had to bung in a screwdriver to stretch the openings. They're still too tight but marginally workable.
The manufacturer should re-assess either their design or their quality control because one of them is way out of kilter.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on August 10, 2011
After only a few uses, one of the 5 cords developed a break in the wire... that is, inside the sealed wire, probably near one end or the other, the circuit stops working unless the wire is bent in a particular way. This is not good to have a short like this, as it could develop into a fire. (likely poor product testing)

Except for this, I would have rated the product a "5".
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