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Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2)
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on April 25, 2003
Format: Paperback
Have you ever wanted to learn about bats? Well, I did. So after reading Anne Earle's fabulous book, Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats, I learned that bats are innocuous, useful and interesting mammals. Let me tell you what I have assimilated.
Bats are considered nefarious by many people but they are actually very timid and friendly. Bats are also considered good luck in China. Many emperors like to have illustrations of bats on their possessions in order to bring them serendipity. Some kids in Midfield, Alabama even formed a club called B.A.T. which is an acronym for Bats Are Terrific. The purpose of the club is to inform people how harmless and useful bats are to people.
Speaking of usefulness, let me illustrate how bats are helpful to humans. Since bats are insectivores (eat only insects), they prey on bugs that bother humans like the menacing mosquito. Bats at Bracken Cave, near San Antonio, Texas, eat approximately 500,000 lbs. of insects a night! That is equal to 250 tons!! That is useful because those insects could have obliterated farmers' crops and people's plants. Also, bats help humans by pollinating flowers and allowing the fruit to grow.
Bats are interesting too! Most bats use echolocation. This is when the bat finds the location of an object or prey by sending out sound waves and listening for the echo. There is at least one bat that does not use echolocation. It is the California Leaf-nosed bat. This bat listens for the insect's footsteps or wing beats to find its meal. Another interesting detail about bats is that they are expert fliers. These mammals also use their wings to catch a scrumptious refection. The prey gets caught in the bat's wing membrane and the bat flips it onto its stomach and then gobbles it up. Next, bats hang upside down in caves, under viaducts, and some attics. They use their talons to get a grip of the ceiling. While hanging upside down, they may choose to sleep or groom themselves. Bats keep themselves as clean as cats by using their tongues to keep themselves immaculate. The last interesting detail that you may want to know is that some spelunkers accidentally kill bats by waking them during their hibernation. When the cave explores wake up the bats, the bats have to use a copious amount of fat to find a new resting spot. Now they won't have enough stored up food (or fat) to make it until spring.
Now that you have read my report about Anne Earle's fabulous book, Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats, I hope you have learned that bats are innocuous, useful and interesting.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon March 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a very readable children's book about bats. It helps to dispel some of those nasty myths about our only flying mammal that seem to persist. I use this book as part of my unit on bats that I teach in my second grade classroom. A twin text that I also use is Stellaluna. Pairing fiction and nonfiction works very well with young children. Zipping... is very informative and a very good resource for exposing children to needed symbiosis of man and nature. I will be building a bat house with ny students as a follow up. Think about this book the next time you find yourself swatting at a pesky mosquito.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on November 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
I love this book and so do my 5 year old son and 7 year old daughter. It is filled with great pictures of bats and all kinds of bat facts. It lets you know that bats are nothing to fear and even shows you how to make a bat house in the back of the book. Did you know that bats are the only flying animals that nurse their young? Bat "pups" hang together in large groups called nurseries and each mother returns at least twice during the night to feed her little pup. Did you know that there is a bat in Australia that has a six foot wing span? I didn't until I read this book...don't worry they eat fruit! I liked bats before...now I like them even more.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Got it for my older brother (wont say how old):)000 We both enjoyed it, learned a lot. Got it to get free shipping well worth it. When ever my brother gets tried of the book he'll give it to someone who needs to learn just how important Bats are!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 30, 2010
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2)
Another good science and nature book for kids. Mine is 5 and this is written at his understanding level. Nice drawings, good information. I don't think you can beat the "Let's read and find out science" books. So far every one we have is well written and has good drawings to go with the text. As usual there are things i didn't know about bats that I learned from this book. Did you know they can catch bugs with their wings and scoop them into their mouth? well, I didn't. There is a set of drawing to demonstrate this and it helped my son visualize what he was hearing. Great combo.
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on August 16, 2014
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Great perspective and context for a generally unappreciated mammal, and a perfect group read on a recent vacation with my kids/grandkids. Grandkids enjoyed it very much, as did the adult kids in listening distance who actually learned something as well!
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on March 8, 2013
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This is a bood starter book about bats for young children. Large photographs and simple text allow young children to understand bats. Good for ages 4-8.
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on December 22, 2014
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
great Book
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on April 14, 1999
Format: Library Binding
This book was about bats like the flying fox and vampire. It taught me all about different kinds of books. I recommend it.
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