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Zlata's Diary: A Child's Life in Wartime Sarajevo, Revised Edition Paperback – February 28, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (February 28, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143036874
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143036876
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.5 x 7.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #173,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Ten-year-old Croatian Filipovic's graphic, firsthand account of life in embattled Sarajevo was a nine-week PW bestseller. Photos.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA-From September 1991 through October 1993, young Zlata Filipovic kept a diary. When she began it, she was 11 years old, concerned mostly with friends, school, piano lessons, MTV, and Madonna. As the diary ends, she has become used to constant bombing and snipers; severe shortages of food, water, and gas; and the end of a privileged adolescence in her native Sarajevo. Zlata has been described as the new Anne Frank. While the circumstances are somewhat similar, and Zlata is intelligent and observant, this diary lacks the compelling style and mature preceptions that gave Anne Frank's account such universality. The entire situation in the former Yugoslavia, however, is of such currency and concern that any first-person account, especially one such as this that speaks so directly to adolescents, is important and necessary. While not great literature, the narrative provides a vivid description of the ravages of war and its effect upon one young woman, and, as such, is valuable for today's YAs.
Susan H. Woodcock, King's Park Library, Burke, VA
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Charles Sutherland on June 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
Zlata's Diary is a masterpiece. A modern-day Diary of Anne Frank is what comes to mind when I think about this book. Zlata is a girl from Sarajevo, writing as only a child can write about terrors that only adults can inflict. From start to finish, this remarkable books keeps you hoping and praying, for Zlata and for her family and friends. Her diary begins before the war, with typical young-girl items like piano lessons and parties, but quickly becomes a nightmare of bombs and guns. She escapes to Paris, and looks back with sorrow. It is a truly moving text.
Zlata writes as any girl would write, in the beginning. The early part of her diary (it begins in September 1991) deals with ideas about school starting and what happened last summer. Short entries into a girl's diary, not too deep, somewhat interesting but also very typical. She could be any girl in any city in this country. She talks about her friends, her favorite TV shows, her music lessons, and enjoying pizza.
She is 11 years old.
But in less than a year, all of that changes.
She is writing letters and entries recounting horrible events of warfare. Less than a year after she was wondering about the top songs on MTV and her music and friends, she was writing profound letters of love, life and survival.
She recounts hiding in dark, ugly cellars, and hearing bombs dropping, and being very afraid. She writes of her friend Nina who died in of shrapnel in the brain -- another 11 year old girl, just like Zlata. They went to kindergarten together, they played together. Now Nina was dead.
Zlata and members of her family escaped to Paris by December 1993; the diary ends at that point. Zlata grew up tremendously, much as Anne Frank did, during those few years of the war.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
This chilling book reminded me just how lucky I am. I forget and take it forgranted that I am so lucky and able to live wholeheartedly. I forget that in many places, children must suffer and abandon their childhood because of cold, angry war.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J. M. Simms on May 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
Sheesh...this is the product of a child, not the work of a Pulitzer prize winning journalist. It is an excellent diary, an excellent primary source and an excellent text for a better understanding of the Yugoslav wars. Yes...it does only tell one point of view - hers - it is her diary! Some readers are offended because of the comparison to Anne Frank; a comparison that Filipovic and others make in the book. The comparison is totally fair. Both are intelligent children caught up in situations they have no control over during wars of ethnic cleansing and extermination. It is a testament to Zlata that she can make the connection to Anne Frank...obviously the rest of the world couldn't. They (We) abandoned the Jews sixty years ago and abandoned hundreds of thousands of Croats/Bosniaks/Serbs to genocide forty years later. Zlata remembered Anne Frank's words...the world didn't.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kevin M Quigg VINE VOICE on August 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
How does war affect people. If you read Zlata's Diary, you will find out how war has affected a little girl. Her friends move away, one friend is shot, and there is the lack of electricity, food, and water. She notices that her parents visibly age as the war progresses. Everybody is under tremendous pressure. She spends many days couped up in her apartment without seeing daylight. Snipers shoot into her bedroom making it unsafe. This is the sad fact of war and how it affects civilians. Zlata shows the world the inhumanity of warfare and its affects on children.

One thing not talked about is who Zlata is...Muslim, Serb, Croat. I know the reason why this was left out. It was to show the effects of war on children regardless of enthicity. Other than the reader's curiousity on this, this is a sad story on what warfare really does to people.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
I liked this book because she told people how it is in a war and how terrible it can be. At the end the book was a little boring but over all it was a great book. I really liked at the beginning how it tells about what things she liked to do and said where she was going. I think it is sad that a person could suffer like that and that a person should have to go through that.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
Zlata's Diary

Zlata Filipovec

Imagine an ordinary day of your eleven-year-old life. School, friends, family, piano, and pets. Then all of a sudden you're stuck in the middle of a war, a fierce war with no way of hiding but your neighbor's cold, dark, damp basement. You are in the life of Zlata Filipovec. In her diary, Zlata talks about what it is like to live during a war: friends leaving, pets dying, hope falling, and rising.

Zlata started writing in Mimmy, her diary, in September of 1991; she stopped writing in 1993. She got the idea of naming her diary from Anne Frank. Zlata's Diary and the diary of Anne Frank have a lot in common: Anne Frank and Zlata are both a part of a war, they both are loosing friends and family left and right, and of course, they both keep a diary in which they write about the war. Zlata's story is different though, she doesn't write about boys, crushes, and dances. She writes about war and fear. The thing I like about Zlata's diary is that she writes about what is important to her, not to other people. She's an individual.

Zlata writes like a twelve year old, which is not too surprising! When I read her writing I feel like I could have written it. I like her style because I can read it with ease. There isn't hard vocabulary or confusing statements. Zlata's Diary really made me realize that anyone could be part of a war. It's not like they asked for it, it just happened. Her diary made me wonder what I would do if I was put in her shoes. Would I be able to deal with such a calamity? Would I be as fearless; would I go and hide? It really made me think.

This book was one of the best biographies I have ever read. When Zlata started writing her diary she had no intention of publishing it at all.
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