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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing book!
I've been trying to come up with the right words to describe my feelings for this book. It's not only a fantastic zombie novel with all the blood and guts a gal could want, but it's also a love story, a murder mystery, AND a comedy all rolled into one killer debut novel! Peter was killed in a car accident, but doesn't realize for a little while that he is one of the...
Published on February 3, 2011 by Rhonda Kachur

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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 3 & 1/2 stars: not as good as I was hoping for
I had heard rave reviews on this book, so I was looking forward to reading it. I love zombie & apocalypse stories, and a book written from a zombie's perspective sounded unique and fresh. It started out interesting, but for the majority of the book I was bored. While I was ready to really love a zombie's take on everything, Peter seemed to go on and on and repeat himself...
Published on June 14, 2011 by A. Boston


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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing book!, February 3, 2011
This review is from: Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead (Paperback)
I've been trying to come up with the right words to describe my feelings for this book. It's not only a fantastic zombie novel with all the blood and guts a gal could want, but it's also a love story, a murder mystery, AND a comedy all rolled into one killer debut novel! Peter was killed in a car accident, but doesn't realize for a little while that he is one of the undead due to the fact that he can still think and talk. He also realizes that his car crash was no "accident", hence the murder mystery aspect! DUN DUN DUN! Now, we have a smart zombie looking for the man who murdered him and who's trying to put the pieces of his life, or what's left of it, left back together. Now the book just came out, so I don't want to give too much away. What I can say is this book is the funniest, bloodiest, best damn zombie novel I have read in a while and I would KILL to see it made into a movie! I think I've finally found the perfect phrase to sum it up...All that and a bag of chips! Oh and did I mention it takes place in my home state? O-H-I-O!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 3 & 1/2 stars: not as good as I was hoping for, June 14, 2011
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This review is from: Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead (Paperback)
I had heard rave reviews on this book, so I was looking forward to reading it. I love zombie & apocalypse stories, and a book written from a zombie's perspective sounded unique and fresh. It started out interesting, but for the majority of the book I was bored. While I was ready to really love a zombie's take on everything, Peter seemed to go on and on and repeat himself a lot. Yea, he was a zombie technically speaking, but really just more of a regular guy who happens to be undead and munch on brains now and then. So Zombie, Ohio for me was just run of the mill as far as enjoying it. Didn't love or hate it.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brains! This Book has Brains!!!, February 14, 2011
This review is from: Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead (Paperback)
I am a huge fan of all things zombie, and to be honest, this has sometimes made me fall prey to less than well written, self-published, needs-actual-editing, type of novels. Lacking depth and, at times, imagination, these books left me feeling a little brain dead myself upon their completion. FINALLY I found the Kenemore! I have been a fan of his humor books from the beginning (starting with The Zen of Zombie), these books are pro-zombie and very tongue in cheek type of humor (comparing Jesus to a zombie, oh my!) And while these are humor books, I have always found them very thoughtful and well written. I have also read some other Scott Kenemore work which was published in the Kenyon Review a while back, and it wasn't a zombie story at all, but about a man tattooing a dead body. Scott Kenmore's a writer capable of many layers, and I believe he especially proves his mastery of the horror genre itself in his latest, and first, full length novel. Zombie, Ohio is a rip roaring fun, tearing up the country side with my zombie horde at my back, in this ultimate "I was raised from the dead and I can still think" adventure type of novel! Wow, that was really a mouth full!

Zombie, Ohio had me chuckling with it's asides to HP Lovecraft (where was the meteor reported?) And it's knowledge of everything from local folk lore (Wild Black Turkeys representing some type of witch?) to the intimate layout of the Ohio countryside. This book was well thought out and planned in three parts. I believe you could actually make a study of some the additional symbolism that Kenemore uses in the book, but you also would need to be aware of his allusions to Zombies in pop culture (movie references throughout also). . again, this is a novel with many layers, on the basic level it is a book about a sad, alcoholic professor who loses his life in a zombie outbreak and finds himself a lucid zombie. But on another level, it is about a man who finds himself ineffectively prepared to live courageously until he becomes one of the undead, and then, we find he is not only effective but indestructible and fearless! Scott Kenmore's novel is also the first "pro-people" Zombie novel I have read, where the people keep it together and adjust and fight the zombies back, another statement of social commentary? And that's not the only example throughout the book of social commentary, and no it is not all positive either.

I would also like to give a big nod and a chuckle to the "first time" scene. . ahh Kenemore says, you never forget your first time. Stinking hilarious! Also, because I am also a baseball fan, the reference to the minor league ball team "The Kernels" was very well received by me! Again, this book had many layers, including it's final part labeled "redemption" which ends without such a thing, if you ask my opinion (I will not give it away, this is a MUST READ, not only if you like zombies but if you enjoy horror at all!) left me very thoughtful and also feeling like Mr. Kenmore was making a statement without ever saying a word. . perhaps, in the end, there is no redemption for any of us, except in death? hmmm. . . ?
This is it guys and gals, the Zombie novel you have been waiting for and craving. . . with BRAINS!!!!!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crazy Brilliant - The Zombie Genre Expands, April 30, 2011
This review is from: Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead (Paperback)
Scott Kenemore's debut novel takes the zombie genre into a new playing field, one where we're not really sure if zombies are good or bad, or maybe just a little bit of both. In his book Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead, Kenemore came up with a grand idea - a zombie wakes up from an apparent car crash with amnesia - he doesn't know who he is, why he is, or where he is, but most importantly he doesn't know he's a zombie.

It's a crazy brilliant premise, and it's one that works well for us, the readers. Professor Peter Mellor slowly discovers who he is, who he was, and what he's now become. It turns out that he was pretty much a jerk, kind of a slimy not well-liked college professor with only one friend, and that friend may have just tried to kill him in a car crash. Zombie Mellor wanders around trying out this new zombie thing, eating brains, killing the living, i.e, doing all the things zombies do during the zombie apocalypse. However, what makes him different from a normal zombie is that what is left of his brain still functions- he can think, plan, use tools and weapons, and seems to be able to command or maybe nudge other zombies into following him across the country killing and ambushing the living. He may have been a bad person while alive, but somehow becomes a zombie with a heart.

For example, rather than killing a young boy he encounters, he feels sorry for the child and finds a way to take the child to a place where he can be cared for. This was a poignant moment in the book, as you visualize a zombie driving a motorcycle with a living boy riding on the seat behind him, wondering why this zombie is not going to eat him. Kenemore challenges the reader with scenes like these, leaving you scratching your head and smiling - you can't help but like this zombie.

You'll like him and feel sorry for him at the same time. As zombie Mellor's quest unfolds, he discovers a lot about himself and spends a bit of time reflecting on his past life and what a jerk he was. Perhaps it's not too late to change, and maybe there's some good he can do now. Mellor winds up wandering around the countryside, gathering zombies, but for what purpose he's not really sure. He becomes kind of famous among the living as he is spotted toting a gun, waving to helicopters, and doing other things zombies are not supposed to do. Part of the book reminded me of Paulo Cuelo's The Alchemist, where the protagonist is on a journey to discover life's meaning, and it must be discovered at all costs.

There's a lot of humor in the book as Mellor interacts with the living in unique and funny ways. One of my favorites is when Mellor talks to a pilot in a downed helicopter, trying to convince him to allow his zombie following to eat his dead co-pilot in a attempt to save the pilot's life. Kenemore creates fantastic dialogue from the Mellor character throughout the book, adding depth to this zombie that I haven't seen in any other zombie novels.

The book combines horror, humor, and mystery in a black film way that makes the book unusual and a joy to read. There's plenty of gore, as there should be in a zombie novel, but the other elements of empathy, passion, and creative thinking make this one of those books you'll want to read through without stopping. I guarantee you won't find a more unique story in the zombie genre. If you are a fan of zombies, you must read this book. If you are not a zombie fan, read it anyway - you will enjoy it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uniquely strange, but fun!, March 14, 2014
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Zombie, Ohio is the first book in the three book (so far) zombie series by Scott Kenemore. It's not a series in the sense of having characters that go through adventures in each book; rather, these are books all set in a zombie world with completely different characters and stories in each book. Consequently, you do not have to read these books in any specific order.

The main character, Peter, is not very lovable - in his zombie aspect or what we learn of his human existence. It's obvious he's not meant to be. This makes it all the more believable that someone tried to murder him.

The story bogged down in the middle for me as Peter marched around with his zombie friends. Peter was in college professor-zombie mode and analyzing everything. I would have preferred more action and less thinking.

I have to say, this is quite a unique novel. An "aware" zombie who holds conversations, but eats brains. He wanders with other zombies and tries so solve his own murder. Strange much? The dark humor is a refreshing change from other zombie books and worth the read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kinda missed the mark..., June 25, 2012
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Although I love the concept of telling a zombie story from the perspective of the zombie, this book really missed the mark for me. Several months ago I read Raising Stony Mayhall and fell in love with the book. Stoney is kind, noble, thoughful, a zombie you can get behind and root for. By the middle of Zombie, Ohio I found myself wanting the main character to get his head blown off because he is such a douche!! I don't mind a protagonist with some issues, but zombie Peter is a guy that I hate undead or alive.
The only reason I gave this book 2 stars is because the other aspects of the book are entertaining.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Zombie perspective, December 31, 2013
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I really enjoyed this story! I am a big fan of zombie stories and this tale did not let me down. Kenmore did an excellent job of writing this from a zombie perspective. If you are looking for a good read with lots of zombie action, then this is it!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BUY THIS BOOK!!, July 23, 2011
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A. Harvey "Karaokekween of the Universe" (Singing at you from the beautiful Emerald Coast of NW FL!) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead (Paperback)
I got mine on Kindle (and what a deal THAT was at only $1.99!) Reads rather like "Shaun of the Dead" would were it a book rather than a movie ... I could hardly contain my laughter throughout. Bloody, gory, GOOD-TIME ZOMBIE FUN; entirely captivating!! And PS If you have not seen the aforementioned "Shaun of the Dead", run, don't walk to check out this brilliant, comic, zombie-ride-of-a-film ... you will be ever so glad that you did!! ("Well, they WERE a bit bite-y" ~ Shaun's mum, Barbara ;O)

AH
XO
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A zombie with a conscience ... mostly., February 23, 2011
This review is from: Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead (Paperback)
What does an author have to do to breathe a little life into zombies these days?

In Scott Kenemore's case, he focused a little less on the zombie hordes and keyed in on just one member of the undead, and told his story. Peter Mellor wakes up with amnesia inside his car, which has been in a serious accident. He wanders his way back into town to find everyone else is dealing with a crisis of their own--a full-blown world-wide zombie apocalypse. As for Peter, amnesia is the least of his worries. After a rather blood-soaked demonstration of how to exterminate zombies outside a compound in town, he discovers while cleaning himself that there's a chunk of his skull missing from under his cap. Oops, Pete's a zombie too.

From there, Peter tries to hide his affliction from everyone, but it's an impossible task as his body is starting to decompose just like every other zombie walking around. Only, he's the only one that is sentient. Things become even more complicated for him when he realizes that his car accident wasn't an accident at all--his brakes had been cut. And with a huge chunk of his memory missing, figuring out who would want to kill him is not going to be easy.

With elements of horror, comedy, mystery, and even a pinch of romance, Kenemore does a really good job in finding a balance. The story flows fairly well and feels like a genuine blend of genres, though there is a bit of a speed bump in the pacing about midway through, that's carried by a very likable and sympathetic character in Peter. Pete's no paragon of virtue though, as he discovers the complications and advantages of being a sentient zombie, as well he is brokenhearted to find the very few people in life he does hold memories of are falling victim to the catastrophe that's befallen them. The mystery surrounding who killed him felt a bit tacked on at first, but through the whole of the novel is works and winds up being one of the key undercurrents to the novel.

Even though I'm not as well read in zombie fiction as the more ardent fans of the genre, I do believe I've hit a kind of saturation point. A motley crew of flawed characters battling a relentless horde of the undead isn't going to hold my attention the way it would have a few years ago. I need something that walks to the beat of a different drum, and that is certainly what Kenemore's novel does. The zombies are slow, shambling creatures and don't set themselves apart from any other Romero-esque monster, except for Peter Mellor of course, but the story in which they populate does feel original as it journeys through familiar territory.

My main criticism of the novel stems from Peter's journey through the countryside as a zombie, after removing himself from the human side of things, hunting down humans he considers bad people like a man he stops from abducting a young girl early on. The trek from town to town, killing people and learning the zombie way drones on after a while, causing me to count the pages until the original story jumps forward again. It's interesting to see things from the zombie horde's point of view, like a Gorillas in the Mist for zombies, but it felt a bit too long for my tastes.

If you're a zombie fan, you're definitely going to want to get your hands on this one. If you're not a zombie fan, you might still want to give this one a chance. Peter Mellor came across as an interesting and genuine character set in extraordinary circumstances. It all depends on how much of the walking dead you can tolerate in your reading, I suppose.
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4.0 out of 5 stars This zompoc story really kept me entertained! It had ..., August 15, 2014
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Molly's mom (Houston, TX USA) - See all my reviews
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This zompoc story really kept me entertained! It had a few twists to it that were really unexpected. The existential narrative was really engrossing but ultimately that is the very reason this story gets four stars and not five. This is a little more "heavy" reading than most zompoc novels and unless you're interested in a zombie's perspective on the ultimate meaning of existence, this may not be the book for you. BUT for those of you who are, this book will keep you turning the pages with its insights, the touches of gore and very dry humor.
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Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead
Zombie, Ohio: A Tale of the Undead by Scott Kenemore (Paperback - February 8, 2011)
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