Zoom (Picture Puffins)
 
 


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Zoom (Picture Puffins) [Paperback]

Istvan Banyai
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (103 customer reviews)

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"Readers are in for a perpetually surprising-and even philosophical-adventure," said PW in a starred review of this wordless picture book that begins with a close-up of a rooster's comb and ends in outer space. Ages 5-up.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 3?This wordless picture book re-creates the effect of a camera lens zooming out. For example, one illustration shows a boy on a cruise ship, the next shows him from a distance, and the next reveals the whole ship. Finally, the viewpoint moves back farther and it turns out that the ship is actually a poster on a bus. The perspective continues to recede, revealing the bus as an image on a television screen. Three pages later, viewers see that the person watching TV is drawn on a postage stamp. The final picture shows a view of Earth from space. To heighten the effect, all of the full-color illustrations appear on the recto, while each verso is completely black. It's fun to watch the transition in perceptions as a farm becomes a toy, the girl playing with it is on a magazine cover, etc. The novelty soon wears off, however, and nothing else about the book is memorable. The paintings themselves are not particularly interesting and would not stand alone well. David Wiesner's Free Fall (Lothrop, 1988), David Macaulay's Black and White (Houghton, 1990), and Ann Jonas's Reflections (Greenwillow, 1987) use visual tricks, but also have richer artwork and more involving action.?Steven Engelfried, West Linn Library, OR
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Ages 6-8. Beginning with a close-up of a rooster's comb, each picture zooms out to give a more distant perspective; for example, the "camera" zooms out to show increasingly distant figures of children watching the rooster. Then, a large hand appears, showing that the scene was not depicting a real farm, but a toy farm set. But zoom out a few more times, and the scene reveals that the picture of the girl playing with the farm set is really on the magazine held by a boy, who's sleeping in a chair, which is by a pool, which is on an ocean liner, which is out at sea--no, wait--that picture is on a cruise-line poster on the side of a city bus, but that picture is on a television screen in the Arizona desert . . . and so on until the earth is shown from above, growing smaller with each turn of the page. The final scene is one white dot on a black page. Clear-cut paintings outlined in ink appear on each right-hand page; the left-hand pages are black. Not a story, but an "idea" book, it makes the viewer ask, "What am I really seeing here?" This clever picture book could be intriguing or irritating, depending on the viewer's frame of mind, but children will find it worth a look. Once, anyway. Carolyn Phelan --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Istvan Banyai is a commercial illustrator and animator as well as the author/illustrator of Zoom (Viking and Puffin) and REM (Viking). He lives in New York City.
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