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Zoom (Viking Kestrel picture books) Hardcover – March 1, 1995


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Zoom (Viking Kestrel picture books) + Re-Zoom + The Red Book (Caldecott Honor Book)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Series: Viking Kestrel picture books
  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Juvenile; Library Binding edition (March 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670858048
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670858040
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #129,876 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This provocative wordless volume can be "read" either from front to back or even from back to front. Either way, it's a startling experience. Its illustrations "zoom" out, as though a viewer has rapidly backed away from each. For example, the first painting, of a jagged-edged red shape, turns out to be a detail of a rooster's comb; as the pages turn, the bird diminishes in importance, until the barn where he stands is shown to be a toy on a magazine's cover. That magazine dangles from the hand of a dozing boy, who himself becomes but a smudge on an advertising billboard. These shifts in perspective repeat until the book abandons earth altogether. The last image is a tiny white sphere-our planet-against a night sky. The bold color and level of detail in Banyai's cartoons recall "Prince Valiant" or another of the "realistic" Sunday comics. If the concept is not wholly new, the execution is superior. Readers are in for a perpetually surprising-and even philosophical-adventure. All ages.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 3?This wordless picture book re-creates the effect of a camera lens zooming out. For example, one illustration shows a boy on a cruise ship, the next shows him from a distance, and the next reveals the whole ship. Finally, the viewpoint moves back farther and it turns out that the ship is actually a poster on a bus. The perspective continues to recede, revealing the bus as an image on a television screen. Three pages later, viewers see that the person watching TV is drawn on a postage stamp. The final picture shows a view of Earth from space. To heighten the effect, all of the full-color illustrations appear on the recto, while each verso is completely black. It's fun to watch the transition in perceptions as a farm becomes a toy, the girl playing with it is on a magazine cover, etc. The novelty soon wears off, however, and nothing else about the book is memorable. The paintings themselves are not particularly interesting and would not stand alone well. David Wiesner's Free Fall (Lothrop, 1988), David Macaulay's Black and White (Houghton, 1990), and Ann Jonas's Reflections (Greenwillow, 1987) use visual tricks, but also have richer artwork and more involving action.?Steven Engelfried, West Linn Library, OR
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Istvan Banyai, creator of the award-winning children's book Zoom and The Other Side, has produced illustrations for such publications as the New Yorker, Playboy, and Rolling Stone; cover art for Sony and Verve Records; and animated short films for Nickelodeon and MTV Europe. He lives in Connecticut.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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It is great for children and adults.
KTpi
If you get this book, don't spoil it by reading anything about it, just open to page one and enjoy the ride.
Laura M.
We used this book for a team building activity in our company.
Michelle B.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 58 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on February 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
Though he's illustrated books for other authors before this, it was really with "Zoom" that artist Istvan Banyai first tried his hand at the wide world of children's picture books. Do a quick Google search of Banyai and you'll see that the man has dipped his toe in everything from book illustrations to pictures for Playboy. Now as a children's librarian I am always on the lookout for good wordless picture books. The wordlessier they are the better. My favorites up until now have been titles like "The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, and the Bard" by Gregory Rogers and "Anno's Journey" by Mr. Mitsumasa Anno himself. In light of his more recent efforts ("The Other Side" comes to mind) it's funny to see how simple his books were at the start. "Zoom" is not a particularly new idea for a book, but it is a fun concept and is sure to garner itself some solid fans throughout the years.

The very first thing you see, on opening the book, is a fleshy and pointed starfish-like creature, but with too many points. Turn the page and the next image is of that same pointy image, but we can see that it's actually the crest of a rooster's comb. Turn the page again and we back up even farther still. Now the rooster is seen perched on a fence while two captivated youngsters look on. You get the gist of the book. The thing is, Banayi keeps backing up, even when you think that there would be nowhere else to go. A farm scene suddenly becomes a toy farm set with a child playing with it. A city street becomes a television program. And a cruise ship resolves itself to be an ad on the side of a bus. As the book backs off farther and farther and farther, in the end the earth recedes until it is only a single white dot in the center of a very black page.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Miri on August 27, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The friend who shared this book with me had received it from a family member who bequeathed it to her as she lay dying of cancer. It is a very beautiful and visual way of internalizing the concept that our lives and everything that happens to us and that we see around us is part of a bigger picture.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Harry J. Mcdargh on March 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
I ran into a description of this remarkable book that is entirely of images in a Sharon Salzburg's "Faith" Learning to Trust YOur Inner Experience". Salzburg, a well regarded Buddhist teacher, used Zoom to make that point that at every point of our existence our vision of what is real is always a tiny piece of what really is.. This deceptively simple book is meant to be looked at slowly and contemplatively. Each frame yields to a progressively bigger and bigger view so that the net effect of moving through its expanding perspective is to loosen our imaginations about what we think is the ultimate environment. Worth spending time with at ANY age.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Although I am a professional writer, my review isn't nearly as technical as the previous two readers'. This, quite simply, is a FUN BOOK! My four month old daughter enjoys the bright images on each page and adults love the zoom concept! It keeps you guessing and reminds you to look at the bigger picture in life... perhaps reminding you that you're not in the world all on your own. Add this to your bookshelf and then pick up an extra copy as sometimes it is not easy to find and you'll surely want to give one as a gift!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jforthman on November 15, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I used this book as an activity when I was facilitating a workshop on leadership roles. We were able to make a great point of what type of leader you are by handing out pages of this book to have the group figure out how it goes back together. Worked wonderful! You could tell who was able to manage the group with only pieces of the big picture. Loved it!
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth C. Hicks on January 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was introduced to this book last night when it was given as a gift to my 50 year-old cousin. All of the aduts present were intrigued with this near-wordless masterpiece. None of us read the inside jacket before 'reading' the book and that is the way it should be read to be truly appreciated. I think the book would be 'wasted' on very young children who would see it as just another picture book. Excellent gift. I'm ordering them for all my (grown) children this minute!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Insomniac on June 22, 2008
Format: Paperback
I use the book ZOOM as a way to show business leaders how their perspectives can change realities. Because it's so affordable, I buy the book in bulk and send it out with personal notes after business leadership classes to help reinforce the training's overall messages on perspective. If you lead people, add ZOOM to your business library - it's fun, easy to understand, and very transferable to the adult learning environment.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 24, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I must disagree with the statement that this book is for children ages 6-8 since much of what Banyai does is well beyond what most children will understand. Banyai's virtual elimination of a fixed frame of reference pulls at the mind in a way that few books aimed at adults do--one simply never is quite sure what is going on. Not only is everything part of something larger (until the end when the earth becomes a period or a hole in the darkness), but there are a few subtle plays on the element of static versus moving and time versus non-time which invite considerable thought.
This book plays on certain postmodern ideas and can be thought of as a very complex exploration of perception and semiosis. These topics are far from typical in "children's literature" and this book will provoke more thought than most popular serious novels will.
Really quite an excellent book!
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